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2019 Spring - *ALL
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AFR
347 3236 1 4   Africana Cinema: Formations of Subjectivity and Representation
TextbookTextbook
Darrell Moore Mon 4:00PM -
6:50PM
Harper 2 In Africana Cinema: Formations of Subjectivity and Representation we will examine and critique concepts of representation and black subjectivity through close readings of select black authored films. We will be concerned with the questions what can film do and how have some black filmmakers worked with film’s capacities to make art that examines questions of subjectivity and representation in the post-civil rights and postcolonial era. The seminar will read works that examine filmmaking as an art practice as well as theses on representation. We will screen and discuss films (and writings, in many cases) by John Akomfrah, Charles Burnett, Kathleen Collins, Julie Dash, Cheryl Dunye, Barry Jenkins, Isaac Julien, Spike Lee, Euzhan Palcy, Raoul Peck, Dee Rees, Ousmane Sembene, Djibril Diop Mambéty.

ARCH
311 3039 1 4   Memory, Knowledge, Loss and Rebirth, or Why Archives Matter
TextbookTextbook
Daniel Lewis, Sat 10:00AM -
12:50PM
Blaisdell 7 Archives -- the textual and increasingly digital records of the past -- have played essential roles in culture, society, law, politics, and much else. Archivists and curators serve as the keepers and interpreters of these collections, and it is the variety of these materials, and their extraordinarily wide uses and rationales, that are the focus of this course. We will scrutinize (and visit) gendered archives, heterogeneous and homogeneous archives, environmental archives, political archives, and three-dimensional collections of materials that are more frequently considered museum collections rather than traditional archival holdings. We will consider archives in foreign countries, tiny private archives, and big, long-established U.S. archives. In doing so, we will stretch our understandings of just what constitutes a collection of historical memory and evidence, how memory is sustained or lost, and ultimately, arrive at a new and robust understanding of why archives are important, how they work and don’t work, and why archives are an essential part of our social, cultural, economic and political fabric. Lastly, the course will also include practical, hands-on work to better understand how these hetereogenous archives are administered. FULFILLS RESEARCH METHODS REQUIREMENT FOR HIST, ARCH, & CLST.

ARMGT
305 3266 1 2 M1 Arts Management Master Class: Cross-Sector Solutions for the Arts
TextbookTextbook
Laura Zucker Mon 1:00PM -
3:50PM
No Room Needed Arts organizations often find themselves addressing intractable social sector issues, such as juvenile justice, homelessness and graffiti abatement; health issues, such as music therapy for Alzheimer patients; environmental issues, such as water conservation or waste management, and myriad other cross sector work. Through site visits to arts organizations throughout Los Angeles deeply engaged in this work, this course will explore the ramifications for arts managers of authentic cross sector work.

ARMGT
308 3269 1 0 - 1   Arts Management On-Site (Field Study Travel)
TextbookTextbook
Kibum Kim, Amy Shimshon-Santo  -
No Room Needed Arts Management on Site introduces students to the businesses, institutions, artists, innovators, and leaders that shape the art world at present through travel to both regional and international venues where the art business is at its most active. Travel is shaped by the art world calendar and its ever changing menu of events. All students are required to participate in field study travel.

ARMGT
311 3256 1 2 M1 Social and Cultural Entrepreneurship
TextbookTextbook
Amy Shimshon-Santo Wed 1:00PM -
3:50PM
Reef 773 (1933 S Broadway, LA) Changes in technology, demographics, and the economy are challenging artists and arts organizations to become more entrepreneurial in their planning and practice while remaining true to their missions. This is true not only for artists, but, also, for arts serving foundations, government agencies, and non-profit organizations. Cultural entrepreneurship provides opportunities to innovate new, and sometimes hybrid non–profit/for-profit approaches, to successful arts management. Cultural Entrepreneurship is not only important for financial sustainability, but, also, for marketing to build audiences and awareness. Employing social media to story-listen and story-tell lets the arts engage with publics across multiple platforms and places. What does a mission driven, earned income strategy look like, and how can cultural entrepreneurship position artists and arts organizations as allies and influencers in the storytelling economy? In this team-oriented, project-based learning course students will imagine and prototype entrepreneurial ventures that amplify the values and cultural assets of an artist or arts organization. Students will overview and critique cultural entrepreneurship in diverse historical and contemporary perspectives – from traditional arts and the informal sector to crowd-funded ventures and formal Benefit Corporations and L3Cs. The course will prepare students to think critically and act creatively as arts leaders to uplift the creative vitality of the communities they care for and serve.

ARMGT
316 3265 1 2 M2 Public Art
TextbookTextbook
Letitia F Ivins Wed 6:00PM -
8:50PM
Reef 773 (1933 S Broadway, LA) Contemporary public art practices rely on community involvement with the goal of creating artwork accessible and usable by the general public. The artwork is often site-specific and it is not uncommon now to see public art projects that incorporate performance and temporary components. This course will examine the chronological path of public art projects from selection to fabrication, installation, and ultimately maintenance, conservation and removal issues. We will explore trends in public art, the legal and ethical concerns to be considered along the way and strategies for building successful public art programs. We will also work closely with the community of Claremont to engage in projects through their office of public art. These hands-on opportunities may include curating a public exhibition; developing a pre-approved list of artists for consideration in Claremont public art projects; or working with the City of Claremont to engage the community and accomplish public art interventions.

ARMGT
328 3378 1 2 M2 Financial Management for Arts Non-Profits
TextbookTextbook
Dianne Debicella Thu 5:30PM -
8:20PM
Reef 773 (1933 S Broadway, LA) Class meets in Los Angeles (CGU @ The Reef, 1933 S. Broadway, Los Angeles). Financial Management for Arts Nonprofits introduces students to financial management and methods for mission-driven arts nonprofit organizations. Students will understand the techniques of day-to-day financial management with particular emphasis on budgeting, financial statements, taxes, audits, and internal controls. They will develop a thorough grasp of funds accounting and of financial analysis. Students will learn from case studies of existing arts organizations in Los Angeles County, and perform fiscal assessments using financial management methods. In addition to the study of firms, participants will be introduced to the practice of fiscal sponsorship for artists and arts organizations often managed by arts service organizations. This course provides a useful set of tools for an emerging arts manager, regardless of art form or professional specialty, and will prepare students to make well-informed fiscal decisions for arts nonprofits.

ARMGT
350 3255 1 2 M1 Theory and Practice of Institutional Leadership
TextbookTextbook
Melody Kanschat Tue 12:00PM -
2:50PM
Reef 773 (1933 S Broadway, LA) This survey course explores the theories, processes, and practices behind strategic planning and decision-making in arts organizations today. Practical applications will focus on developing concrete strategies and plans for managing arts organizations, including business plans, managing boards, fund-raising, human resources, facilities, and program development. Guest speakers who are leaders in the field will add diverse perspectives to class discussions of the major topics. Focus on specifics types of arts organizations will depend upon the interests of the students in the course.

ARMGT
351 3297 1 2 M2 Arts & Cultural Policy
TextbookTextbook
Laura Zucker Mon 1:00PM -
3:50PM
Reef 773 (1933 S Broadway, LA) Cultural policy shapes government and private support of the arts and culture and is connected to a broad array of other areas and issues such as public education, artist rights, and economic development. This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the importance of cultural policy and the many ways it influences cultural production, consumption and various other forms of participation in the arts in the United States. The specific emphasis of the course is on how cultural policy is developed and implemented at various levels, with a particular emphasis on local dynamics in the Southern California Region.

ARMGT
359 3253 1 4   Research and Evaluation for the Arts
TextbookTextbook
Bronwyn Mauldin Mon 5:00PM -
7:50PM
Reef 771-2 (1933 S Broadwy LA) Instructor: Bronwyn Mauldin This class will introduce research methods and principles as they are practiced in arts management, including both qualitative and quantitative perspectives. The skills required to read, understand, analyze and utilize arts data will be explored and practiced. Works by key researchers in the arts field will be critically analyzed. Students will also engage in hands-on exercises in the classroom as well as conduct data collection in the field. The course will culminate in a student-developed research proposal that will demonstrate understanding of all stages of the process from developing a research question and collecting data to analysis and report writing.

ARMGT
365A 3267 1 2 M1 Performing Arts Producing and Presenting I
TextbookTextbook
Renae W Niles Wed 5:30PM -
8:20PM
Reef 773 (1933 S Broadway, LA) Performing arts management and presenting supports contemporary and traditional expressions of dance, music, theater, and spoken word, and often involves multi-disciplinary works that cross boundaries between art forms. The performing arts are rooted in the act of performance, the body, and the voice. Performance inherently involves audience engagement, witnessing, and participation. This interdisciplinary field of creative social action imparts knowledge, defines a culture, transmits identity, and shares meaning through artistic and cultural experiences. Performing arts management and presenting invests in individual artists, arts organizations, place-based initiatives, and platforms to expand participation in the performing arts in live and virtual settings. This pragmatic course prepares students to pursue careers in the performing arts today, and to navigate an ever-evolving future. Participants will become well versed in the various individual roles and organizational structures within the performing arts landscape including: 1) artist representation, administration, producing entities, and presenting models; 2) shifting paradigms between artists, performances spaces, and communities, and 3) the touring of work via formal and informal support systems. Students will also analyze trends, innovations, challenges, and opportunities shaping the future of the field.

ARMGT
365B 3268 1 2 M2 Performing Arts Producing and Presenting II
TextbookTextbook
Amy Shimshon-Santo Tue 11:00AM -
1:50PM
No Room Needed This course will be offered off-site at the Ford Theater (Prerequisite: AM 365A) This course builds on previous learning in Performing Arts Producing and Presenting I and embeds students in a professional theater setting to prepare students for careers in performing arts management. In collaboration with the Los Angeles County’s Ford Theatres, students gain hands-on experience working with local artists, producers, and presenters in their Artists Partnership Program (APP). Participants will learn how the theater identifies and recruits Los Angeles based artists, presenters and promoters, and develops relationships to usher them through the process of producing live arts. Students will fulfill outreach with local artists and producers, and implement methods to strengthen organizational capacity. We will engage and choose from various artistic genres including dance, theatre, music, film, literary and arts/media multidisciplinary productions. Working closely with faculty, artists, and the Ford staff, this course will directly support the successful curation and implementation of a real world performing arts season at the theater.

ARMGT
377A 3377 1 2 M2 Curatorial Practices: A Place for Invention
TextbookTextbook
Alma Ruiz, Irene Tsatsos Tue 4:00PM -
6:50PM
Reef 771-2 (1933 S Broadwy LA) Class meets in Los Angeles (CGU @ The Reef, 1933 S. Broadway, Los Angeles). What is a curator? What does a curator do? A not so well-defined figure the curator has become a selector and interpreter of the art in an exhibition. Playing the role of producer, manager, educator, and organizer, the curator is also responsible for wall text and labels, catalog essays, and other exhibition support content. The curator may be called upon to help with fundraising, to interact with the public and the press, and to lecture and conduct seminars. As the curator's role expands so do the skills required to meet new challenges. This course will lead students from the starting point of ideas and inspiration to the actual curating of an exhibition, encouraging them to be "hybrid, flexible and open to collaborative endeavors," hallmarks of a successful and dynamic curatorial career.

ARMGT
400M 3403 1 0   Continuous Registration (MA Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Continuous Registration is the continuation course for a master's level student to complete requirements for the degree.

ARMGT
401A 3298 1 2 M2 Arts Management Pre-Practicum
TextbookTextbook
Amy Shimshon-Santo Wed 1:00PM -
3:50PM
Reef 773 (1933 S Broadway, LA) This course prepares students to identify and define a capstone thesis project, and is a pre-requisite for participation in the Arts Management thesis Practicum (Course 401B). Students work individually, or in teams, to identify a project focus, craft a scope of work with an arts entity (organization, network, or collective), and outline a plan of applied study. Students gain understanding of key issues, dilemmas, and opportunities in arts management through critical reading, organizational analysis, group discussion, individual goal setting, field observations, and face-to-face meetings with arts professionals. Students define and agree on project goals with an existing arts entity, target best practices for action, and negotiate an approved scope of work. In addition to individual applied projects, students may also choose from a small group project led by a faculty mentor in service of the broader arts community.

ART
301 3123 1 1 - 3   Studio Art
TextbookTextbook
David Amico TueWed 10:00AM -
4:50PM
No Room Needed Art 301 Studio Art is a graduate-level course in which the student meets one-on-one with core faculty to discuss the student's work.

ART
301 3124 2 1 - 3   Studio Art
TextbookTextbook
Rachel Lachowicz TueWed 10:00AM -
4:50PM
No Room Needed Art 301 Studio Art is a graduate-level course in which the student meets one-on-one with core faculty to discuss the student's work.

ART
301 3138 3 1 - 3   Studio Art
TextbookTextbook
David Pagel Tue 9:30AM -
12:20PM
No Room Needed Art 301 Studio Art is a graduate-level course in which the student meets one-on-one with core faculty to discuss the student's work.

ART
302 3137 1 1 - 2   Studio Art
TextbookTextbook
Carmine Iannaccone Thu 4:00PM -
5:50PM
No Room Needed Art 302 Studio Art is a graduate-level course in which the student meets one-on-one with adjunct faculty to discuss the student's work.

ART
302 3150 10 1 - 2   Studio Art
TextbookTextbook
Farrah Karapetian Fri 10:00AM -
3:30PM
No Room Needed Art 302 Studio Art is a graduate-level course in which the student meets one-on-one with adjunct faculty to discuss the student's work.

ART
302 3151 11 1 - 2   Studio Art
TextbookTextbook
Catherine Liu Thu 10:00AM -
2:50PM
No Room Needed Art 302 Studio Art is a graduate-level course in which the student meets one-on-one with adjunct faculty to discuss the student's work.

ART
302 3152 12 1 - 2   Studio Art
TextbookTextbook
Amy Santoferraro Tue 11:00AM -
4:30PM
No Room Needed Art 302 Studio Art is a graduate-level course in which the student meets one-on-one with adjunct faculty to discuss the student's work.

ART
302 3143 2 1 - 2   Studio Art
TextbookTextbook
Julian Hoeber Tue 12:00PM -
5:30PM
No Room Needed Art 302 Studio Art is a graduate-level course in which the student meets one-on-one with adjunct faculty to discuss the student's work.

ART
302 3144 3 1 - 2   Studio Art
TextbookTextbook
Michael Reafsnyder Tue 9:00AM -
2:30PM
No Room Needed Art 302 Studio Art is a graduate-level course in which the student meets one-on-one with adjunct faculty to discuss the student's work.

ART
302 3145 4 1 - 2   Studio Art
TextbookTextbook
Iva Gueorguieva Tue 12:00PM -
5:30PM
No Room Needed Art 302 Studio Art is a graduate-level course in which the student meets one-on-one with adjunct faculty to discuss the student's work.

ART
302 3146 5 1 - 2   Studio Art
TextbookTextbook
Jenelle A Porter Wed 11:00AM -
3:50PM
No Room Needed Art 302 Studio Art is a graduate-level course in which the student meets one-on-one with adjunct faculty to discuss the student's work.

ART
302 3147 6 1 - 2   Studio Art
TextbookTextbook
Erik N Frydenborg Wed 11:00AM -
3:50PM
No Room Needed Art 302 Studio Art is a graduate-level course in which the student meets one-on-one with adjunct faculty to discuss the student's work.

ART
302 3437 7 1 - 2   Studio Art
TextbookTextbook
Lorenzo E Hurtado Segovia Thu 10:00AM -
2:50PM
No Room Needed Art 302 Studio Art is a graduate-level course in which the student meets one-on-one with adjunct faculty to discuss the student's work.

ART
302 3148 8 1 - 2   Studio Art
TextbookTextbook
Miriam I Lauter Tue 11:00AM -
3:50PM
No Room Needed Art 302 Studio Art is a graduate-level course in which the student meets one-on-one with adjunct faculty to discuss the student's work.

ART
302 3149 9 1 - 2   Studio Art
TextbookTextbook
David A Muller Thu 10:00AM -
3:30PM
No Room Needed Art 302 Studio Art is a graduate-level course in which the student meets one-on-one with adjunct faculty to discuss the student's work.

ART
329 3126 1 3   Installation (Context, Power & Placement)
TextbookTextbook
Rachel Lachowicz Wed 10:00AM -
11:50AM
No Room Needed Installation (Context, Power & Placement) encourages the production and contemplation of all kinds of art installations. This course is not focused on what Installation Art is, rather it takes on the complexity of art’s multifaceted and ever changing spatial relationships. We will look at Mega installations, the roll of art fairs and other 21st century exhibition dynamics in contemporary art. Students will be expected to think about the viewing, making, and showing of art in a variety of exhibition spaces, locations and conditions.

ART
345 3411 1 4   Ideas in Contemporary Art
TextbookTextbook
Carmine Iannaccone Thu 1:00PM -
3:50PM
McManus 31 Literature has been called the "theatre of the mind;" it is an art of pure conjury. But where reading is usually internal, solitary and disembodied, the visual arts are always external, social forms in which groups of people with actual bodies gather around tactile, material phenomena, also with actual bodies. Much scholarship has explored the zone of overlap between these two seemingly disparate art forms - the visuality of literature, the narrative power of painting/sculpture - and in this class we will indeed look at that research. But we also need a more utilitarian term to cover the shared territory and help us develop an understanding of the actual mechanisms that ally the theatre of the mind with the theatre of objects. That term is "fantasy." In three movements, the class will identify different species of fantasy as they have flowered in our contemporary cultural ecosystems. Using the methodologies of the naturalist as our model, our goal will be to analyze these species, name them, and ask why they have taken root amongst us now. What are the favorable conditions that have made their appearance possible? How long have they been with us? How long might we predict that they will stay? And how do they transcend the supposed boundaries between visuality and the verbal?

ART
348 3140 1 4   Survey of Contemporary Art - Field Work
TextbookTextbook
David Pagel Fri 2:00PM -
4:50PM
Reef 771-2 (1933 S Broadwy LA) Contact art department for course description.

ART
395 3139 1 2   Written Statement Seminar
TextbookTextbook
David Pagel Tue 1:00PM -
3:50PM
No Room Needed Second and third semester seminar for preparation of written statement to accompany advancement meeting and final thesis exhibition.

ART
396 3141 1 3 - 15   MFA Project
TextbookTextbook
David Amico Tue 10:00AM -
4:50PM
No Room Needed Thesis defense with the three members of your MFA committee.

ART
396 3142 2 3 - 15   MFA Project
TextbookTextbook
Rachel Lachowicz Tue 10:00AM -
4:50PM
No Room Needed Thesis defense with the three members of your MFA committee.

ARTBUS
300B 3245 1 2 M1 Comparative Art Markets
TextbookTextbook
Kibum Kim Wed 10:00AM -
12:50PM
Reef 771-2 (1933 S Broadwy LA) A partner course to Art Market Dynamics, Comparative Art Markets pulls back the lens on the question of value addressed in that course in order to look at a broad range of art markets and how they “perform” with respect to one another. The first part of the course compares regional and temporal markets to one another. For example, nineteenth century American and British art, or modern Latin American and South Asian art. The second part of the course looks at how markets are broken down according to medium, for example painting vs. sculpture, photography vs. prints, drawings vs. new media. In every case, the questions the course asks are: What does it mean to segment markets in this manner? Are there other ways of analyzing and comparing similar markets using different variables and metrics? Using statistical analysis, students will conduct their own art market analytics in order to test for answers to these and other questions.

ARTBUS
300C 3243 1 2 M1 Contemporary Art Markets
TextbookTextbook
Kibum Kim Tue 4:00PM -
6:50PM
Reef 771-2 (1933 S Broadwy LA) A partner course to Art Market Dynamics, Contemporary Art Markets look specifically at the market for contemporary art from its blue chip to emerging manifestations. It is difficult to value art with no reasonable or robust track record in the secondary marketplace (i.e. at auction) nor with any historical pedigree. Yet the market for contemporary art works has far surpassed many other categories of collecting, including Impressionist and Modern art. This course looks at the dynamics at play in the contemporary art marketplace. Through a combination of case studies, as well as structural and statistical analysis, students will unpack the contemporary art market, while comparing it to markets for other goods (real estate, luxury goods, and commodities).

ARTBUS
303 3250 1 2 M2 New Venture Creation
TextbookTextbook
Jonathan Neil, Kibum Kim, Hovig Tchalian Wed 1:30PM -
4:20PM
Reef 771-2 (1933 S Broadwy LA) This course covers the principles of entrepreneurship (e.g. managing process, value creation, teams, & growth) as well as various different entrepreneurial models (e.g. the lean startup, the "non non-profit," the "innovator’s dilemma," etc.), all with an eye towards generating ideas for new ventures. Following a research-based approach, students are asked to identify opportunities, customers, and markets for new products, services, businesses, organizations, and initiatives. This course is a prerequisite to the Startup Studio, in which students develop their venture ideas into fully fledged enterprise plans and pitches.

ARTBUS
304A 3427 1 2 M1 Professional Practice I: The Gallery Business
TextbookTextbook
Donna S. Chu, Harmony B Murphy Thu 1:00PM -
3:50PM
Reef 773 (1933 S Broadway, LA) The Fundamentals of an Art Gallery is a detailed look into a contemporary art gallery, what it is, how it functions, how it’s structured and what role it plays in the greater art world. This course gives an in-depth look at the financial system and operations of a gallery. Fundamentals of an Art Gallery includes site visits to galleries to meet with the gallery owners to get their personal insight and experience. The course will conclude with each student creating a business plan for a gallery. The issues each student will address are how they are going to fund the gallery startup, projecting revenue and expenses, staffing, sourcing artists, creating a program, and creating a sample exhibition schedule for the year. Prerequisite ARTBUS 300.

ARTBUS
304B 3248 1 2 M2 Professional Practice II: Appraising Contemporary Art
TextbookTextbook
Karen McManus Wed 10:00AM -
12:50PM
Reef 771-2 (1933 S Broadwy LA) This course provides the essential framework and methodology of personal property appraisal with an emphasis on contemporary art. Students will gain a general knowledge of the duties of a professional appraiser; learn about different types of appraisals (insurance, estate tax, charitable contribution, equitable distribution, etc.); examine the types of value and valuation approaches used in appraisal reports; investigate different markets and market levels; and explore challenges specific to appraising contemporary works of art. Other topics covered include client relations, standards and codes of ethics, authenticity, appraisal report requirements, identifying appropriate comparables, and establishing a practice. Prerequisite: ARTBUS 300.

ARTBUS
308 3241 1 0 - 1   Art Business On-Site (Field Study Travel)
TextbookTextbook
Kibum Kim, Amy Shimshon-Santo  -
No Room Needed Art Business on Site introduces students to the businesses, institutions, artists, innovators, and leaders that shape the art world at present through travel to both regional and international venues where the art business is at its most active. Travel is shaped by the art world calendar and its ever changing menu of events. All students are required to participate in field study travel.

ARTBUS
316 3264 1 2 M2 Public Art
TextbookTextbook
Letitia F Ivins Wed 6:00PM -
8:50PM
Reef 773 (1933 S Broadway, LA) Public art produces art works and experiences that amplify local histories, identities, and sense of belonging to place. Public art processes are often grounded in collaborations with artists, community members, designers, and engineers. Contemporary public art practices rely on community involvement with the goal of creating accessible artwork that is meaningful to the general public. The artwork is often site-specific and may incorporate performative and temporary components. This course will study key motivations, ideas, and strategies relevant to public art including creative process, civic engagement, construction, installation, and preservation. Students will become familiar with best practices across the life cycle of public arts including creation, curation, fabrication, installation, maintenance, conservation, restoration, and removal issues. Participants will come to know the foundational ideals, histories, and trends used to enliven public spaces through the arts.

ARTBUS
327 3426 1 2 M1 Advanced Topics: Art Collaborations
TextbookTextbook
Samantha H Culp Wed 6:00PM -
8:50PM
Reef 771-2 (1933 S Broadwy LA) Brands and the Art World: An Evolving Relationship explores the increasingly central role of brands in the art world, and how they’re shaping the future of the creative industries. Artists have always had patrons - from the church, to royalty, to private collectors - but today consumer brands like Louis Vuitton, BMW, and Google are collaborating with artists like never before. The course gives students a detailed understanding of how and why these projects are shaped, as well as best practices for developing projects between the diverse stakeholders of artists, brands, and creative agencies. The course will feature lectures by guest speakers with first-hand experience in these projects, from the artist, agency, and brand side. As an assessment, the students will be given weekly reading and research assignments to develop a speculative brand-art collboration. Students will develop a proposal to be presented to the class as a live “pitch" including artist curation, creative direction, project budget, sample contracts, and press strategy.

ARTBUS
331 3263 1 4   The California Avant-Garde
TextbookTextbook
Kavior K Moon Tue 10:00AM -
12:50PM
Reef 771-2 (1933 S Broadwy LA) What is contemporary art? Why and how does it matter? This course explores the field of contemporary art history, that is, a history of art movements and theoretical frameworks from the end of World War II until the present day. The course will not attempt to be comprehensive, but rather focuses on pivotal artworks, conceptual problematics, and theoretical texts that have structured the discourse of this field. Taking an international perspective, we will discuss select artworks produced in North America, Europe, Latin America, East Asia, and Africa. Art movements to be studied include Abstract Expressionism, Art Informel, Gutai, Happenings, Fluxus, Neoconcretismo, Pop art, Minimalism, Land art, Conceptual art, Institutional Critique, performance art as well as the artistic use of photography, film, video, and other technological media. Throughout the course, we will examine major issues in contemporary art, including questions of authorship, identity politics, the ethics of spectator-ship, and globalization.

ARTBUS
350 3470 1 4   Sotheby's Institute of Art NY Track I
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Course taught at SIA/NY Campus Please contact the department for more information regarding the courses details. COURSE OPEN ONLY TO THIRD SEMESTER STUDENTS ATTENDING SIA NY

ARTBUS
377A 3376 1 2 M2 Curatorial Practices: Foundations of Curating
TextbookTextbook
Alma Ruiz, Irene Tsatsos Tue 4:00PM -
6:50PM
Reef 771-2 (1933 S Broadwy LA) Class meets in Los Angeles (CGU @ The Reef, 1933 S. Broadway, Los Angeles). What is a curator? What does a curator do? A not so well-defined figure, the curator has become a selector and interpreter of the art in an exhibition. The curator conceives of the exhibition thesis; plays the role of producer, manager, educator, and organizer; and is responsible for wall text and labels, catalog essays, and other exhibition support content. The curator may be called upon to help with fundraising, to interact with the public and the press, and to lecture and conduct seminars. As the curator’s role expands so do the skills required to meet new challenges. This course takes students through the full life cycle of mounting and managing an exhibition, using as a textbook Adrian George’s The Curator’s Handbook, slide presentations by faculty of relevant exhibitions, and visits to and from professionals at area museums. This class is the first of three related modules that explore all aspects of making and managing exhibitions. It is open to all students, and is a mandatory prerequisite to the second and third modules.

ARTBUS
400M 3404 1 0   Continuous Registration (MA Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Continuous Registration is the continuation course for a master's level student to complete requirements for the degree.

AWS
400M 3270 1 0   Continuous Registration (MA Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Continuous Registration is the continuation course for a master's level student to complete requirements for the degree.

BOT
305 3021 1 4   Plant Morphology & Anatomy
TextbookTextbook
Travis Columbus TueThu 9:00AM -
11:50AM
No Room Needed Survey of morphology (form) and anatomy (structure) in plants. Lecture and laboratory

BOT
345 3382 1 2   Modern Analytical Methods in Biogeography
TextbookTextbook
J. Mark Porter Tue 1:00PM -
3:50PM
No Room Needed Review of current analytical methods in biogeography.

BOT
400M 3282 1 0   Continuous Registration (MS Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Continuous Registration is the continuation course for a master's level student to complete requirements for the degree.

BOT
401 3023 1 1   Seminar Series
TextbookTextbook
Lucinda McDade Fri 4:00PM -
4:50PM
No Room Needed Students enrich their educational program by actively participating in a semester-long series of seminars presented by outstanding visiting researchers. Students are directly involved in the development of the series by inviting speakers whose research and areas of expertise parallel individual student interests. Students serve as hosts for their invited speakers, coordinating visit details with appropriate Botany program staff, students, and faculty. Students also evaluate each seminar presentation in terms of the quality of the research presented and the quality of the style of the presentation. These evaluations are discussed by all participants in several class meetings over the course of the semester.

BOT
412 3022 1 1   Special Topics in Plant Systematics: Readings in Phylogenetics
TextbookTextbook
Travis Columbus Wed 4:00PM -
4:50PM
No Room Needed Review and discussion of phylogenetics based on the current literature.

BOT
499 3283 1 0   Doctoral Study (PhD Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Doctoral Study is the continuation course for a doctoral student to complete their dissertation and other requirements for the degree.

CGH
301 3163 1 4   Biostatistics
TextbookTextbook
Bin Xie Mon 9:00AM -
12:50PM
Academic Computing 126 Students are trained in the most commonly used statistical methods in clinical and experimental research. Students learn to select the most appropriate data analytic methods; how to apply these methods to actual data; and how to read and interpret computer output from commonly used statistical packages. In addition, the students learn to read, critique and interpret statistical concepts in the health science literature.

CGH
301C 3379 1 4   Biostatistics
TextbookTextbook
Bin Xie Mon 9:00AM -
12:50PM
Academic Computing 126 Students are trained in the most commonly used statistical methods in clinical and experimental research. Students learn to select the most appropriate data analytic methods; how to apply these methods to actual data; and how to read and interpret computer output from commonly used statistical packages. In addition, the students learn to read, critique and interpret statistical concepts in the health science literature. Course registration limited to students in the Certificate in Foundations of Public Health program.

CGH
303 3198 1 4   Health Services in the US & Abroad
TextbookTextbook
Deborah Freund Thu 9:00AM -
11:50AM
Academic Computing 214 This course examines the health care delivery system to understand contemporary issues affecting the health of the American and International public and the institutions that provide health services and protect health. The course includes the historical development of various health care systems, determinants of health and health care utilization, the role of health care providers, health policy and politics, health care financing, public health, and the interactions of various components of the systems. The class emphasizes how institutions within the health care delivery system affect public health including planning, organization, administration, evaluation and policy analysis.

CGH
303C 3231 1 4   Health Services in the US & Abroad
TextbookTextbook
Deborah Freund Thu 9:00AM -
11:50AM
Academic Computing 214 This course examines the health care delivery system to understand contemporary issues affecting the health of the American and International public and the institutions that provide health services and protect health. The course includes the historical development of various health care systems, determinants of health and health care utilization, the role of health care providers, health policy and politics, health care financing, public health, and the interactions of various components of the systems. The class emphasizes how institutions within the health care delivery system affect public health including planning, organization, administration, evaluation and policy analysis.

CGH
304 3200 1 4   Environmental & Occupational Health
TextbookTextbook
Nicole Gatto Tue 9:00AM -
11:50AM
Burkle 12 This course provides a broad overview of the field of environmental and occupational health, developing a public health approach to understanding and preventing disease and disability. Students apply the principles of the biological impact pathway and environmental epidemiology to environmental and occupational health issues. Students analyze the exposure-disease continuums and disease prevention. Emphasis is placed on learning and using concepts related to the sources and behavioral determinants of exposure, the social behavioral, Physiological and genetic basis of sensitivity, and dose-response relationships.

CGH
304C 3235 1 4   Environmental & Occupational Health
TextbookTextbook
Nicole Gatto Tue 9:00AM -
11:50AM
Burkle 12 This course provides a broad overview of the field of environmental and occupational health, developing a public health approach to understanding and preventing disease and disability. Students apply the principles of the biological impact pathway and environmental epidemiology to environmental and occupational health issues. Students analyze the exposure-disease continuums and disease prevention. Emphasis is placed on learning and using concepts related to the sources and behavioral determinants of exposure, the social behavioral, Physiological and genetic basis of sensitivity, and dose-response relationships.

CGH
305 3176 1 2 - 4   Seminar in Grant Writing & Proposal Development
TextbookTextbook
Jessica Noelle Clague Dehart Mon 4:00PM -
6:50PM
Burkle 22 The goal of this course is to provide students completing their field training an opportunity to enhance their skills in the area of grant writing and reviewing. The student will learn the steps in planning and writing the grant, understanding the funding environment, learning how to choose different types of grants, and understand the submission and review process. Course can be taken for either 2 or 4 units. CGH students only; all other students by faculty permission.

CGH
306 3242 1 4   Supervised Field Training in Public Health
TextbookTextbook
Darleen Peterson  -
No Room Needed The goal of the supervised field training course is to enrich students' educational training in public health by providing an opportunity to apply theory and skills acquired from their concentration to community based research and service in a practice setting. Students contribute to an agency's resources and to the solution of public health problems while developing personal confidence and leadership as a public health professional.

CGH
307 3244 1 0 - 2   Public Health Capstone
TextbookTextbook
Sondos Islam  -
No Room Needed The Public Health Capstone is the culminating experience for the MPH degree. Through this experience, students must demonstrate proficiency with public health core and track specific competencies. Student portfolios can be used to determine whether program student learning competencies have been met. Working with advisement from the Program Director, students will collect evidence of work in their courses and practice opportunities that have enabled them to master program competencies. Also documented are program experiences outside the classroom, including formal employment in public health, leadership skills (i.e. professional presentations, publications, professional conference attendance, professional association membership, leadership positions, and civic engagement) and a reflection of diversity and cultural competence within their role as a practitioner. Students will also prepare a scholarly paper based on requirements for their concentration.

CGH
308 3205 1 4   Foundations in Program Planning
TextbookTextbook
Kim Reynolds Thu 1:00PM -
3:50PM
Academic Computing 214 This course introduces the core concepts, values, and methods of public health program planning and evaluation. Students develop skills for assessing community needs for health promotion; preparing written measurable health promotion program objectives with associated methods for achieving those objectives; designing health promotion program action plans that include implementation schemes; and evaluation strategies for measuring health program process, impact, and outcome effectiveness. Students apply their knowledge of health promotion theories to effectively to plan, implement, and evaluate health promotion and communication programs.

CGH
312 3180 1 4   Data Analysis (SAS)
TextbookTextbook
Bin Xie Fri 9:00AM -
12:50PM
Academic Computing 126 Students learn how to manage and analyze data using the SAS. Topics include inputting data into SAS, preparing data from analysis, data screening to understanding distributions, detect outliers etc., hypothesis testing (e.g. t-tests, nonparametric procedures, chi-square tests, etc.), simple and multiple linear regression, techniques for building and evaluating a regression model, analysis of variance model and logistic regression.

CGH
313 3184 1 4   Research Methods
TextbookTextbook
Jessica Noelle Clague Dehart Wed 1:00PM -
3:50PM
Burkle 24 Students will gain an understanding of the principles and skills of conducting behavioral research, using qualitative and quantitative approaches commonly used in public health settings.

CGH
318 3194 1 4   Management of International Health Programs & Organizations
TextbookTextbook
Paula Palmer Wed 7:00PM -
9:50PM
Burkle 12 This course reviews the management of health programs and services in the developing world, including international technical cooperating, donor and development agencies as well as private and non-profit health organizations. It offers a management perspective to address the most prevalent problems of health care delivery and systems performance around the world as they relate to the specific administration functions of planning, organizing, resourcing, directing and controlling medical and public health services.

CGH
319 3203 1 4   Health Advocacy
TextbookTextbook
Jay Orr Wed 4:00PM -
6:50PM
Academic Computing 119 This course establishes a framework within which advocacy is understood to be an essential role of the public health professional in promoting, implementing, and sustaining effective public health policy and social justice. Through case studies, readings, lectures, role plays, field research, and action planning, students will develop the skills needed to be an effective advocate for public health. Students will develop an advocacy action plan on a current public health issue.

CGH
349F 3213 1 4   US Health Policy
TextbookTextbook
Deborah Freund Sat 9:00AM -
5:30PM
Harper, Board of Trustees Rm Do you ever wonder why despite being the wealthiest country in the world, Americans are sicker and in poorer health on average than elsewhere? Or why our health care and pharmaceutical costs are higher? Or why there are disparities in health by income, race and ethnicity? Do you wonder why legislators in California and Vermont have proposed the adoption of universal insurance through a single payor system? How about what we can do to improve the situation and what the tradeoffs are? Do you wonder what the future portends for students as they enter the workforce and must face their own health choices? This class will tackle these questions by studying our country’s health policy choices, those of other countries, and what we can do to improve health in communities and for individuals. And, we will stay up-to date with proposed changes in health policy in Washington. To understand health policy we will ensure an understanding of topics which underpin all of current policies including the socio economics determinants of health, the costs of care, paying for care, health disparities, how patients should be treated including collaboration and integration of care, access to care, our health workforce. The class will feature several very well-known and prominent guest speakers including physicians, hospital executives and others who will share their views of health policy issues and meet the members of class.

CGH
400 3188 1 4   Advanced Theoretical Foundations in Health Education & Promotion
TextbookTextbook
Kim Reynolds Tue 1:00PM -
3:50PM
Burkle 26 This course provides detailed coverage of theories in Health Promotion Sciences and expands on the exploration and evaluation of the theories of social and behaviors influences introduced in CGH 300. The course also introduced and evaluates theories on the influence of the built environment, social and implicit cognition, self-determination theory and theories of social influence. An emphasis will be placed on the critical examination of theories, the degree to which they explain variance in human behavior, and ways in which novel theories can be developed and tested in an effort to enhance the prediction of health behavior.

CGH
400M 3247 1 0   Continuous Registration (MA Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Continuous Registration is the continuation course for a master's level student to complete requirements for the degree.

CGH
406 3254 1 0   Advanced Practicum in Public Health
TextbookTextbook
Lyzette Blanco  -
No Room Needed The goal of the advanced doctoral practicum in public health is to provide an opportunity for doctoral students to synthesize, integrate and apply the skills, knowledge and training acquired through courses of study to a high-level planned, approved, supervised and evaluated practice experience. During the practicum, students will gain professional experience through collaborating with practitioners, developing leadership competencies and contributing to the field of public health. Through their placement within an external organization, students are responsible or the completion of at least one significant project that is meaningful for the organization and to advanced public health practice.

CGH
407A 3238 1 0   Advanced Integrative Practicum in Public Health (Rotations)
TextbookTextbook
Jamie Felicitas-Perkins Wed 9:00AM -
11:50AM
No Room Needed The advanced integrative practicum in public health is comprised of three progressive experiences engaging students in practice taken simultaneously with didactic DrPH coursework. Begins with introduction to the health system, continues with interactive instruction from experts in public health, and culminates in a high-level practice-based project. This course is the first in the series of experiences. Students complete rotations in the field gaining exposure to all critical entities of an integrated health system, including with ancillary organizations that serve communities. (2 semesters registrations required) Part B The integrative practicum will also integrate a seminar-style aspect bringing key leaders from RUHS and CBOs to speak with DrPH students at SCGH in order to present practice topics with their challenges less addressed by the didactic coursework. (2 semesters registrations required; pre-req: 407A (2 semesters)) Part C years of training experiences that provide an opportunity for doctoral students to synthesize, integrate and apply the skills, knowledge and training acquired through courses of study complement (pre-req: 407B (1 semester). Graduated incremental Engagement

CGH
407B 3239 1 0   Advanced Integrative Practicum in Public Health (Seminars)
TextbookTextbook
Jamie Felicitas-Perkins Thu 4:00PM -
6:50PM
No Room Needed The advanced integrative practicum in public health is comprised of three incremental practice experiences engaging students in health system leadership and management and complementing the DrPH didactic curriculum. The integrative practicum begins with an introduction to the health system, continues with interactive instruction from experts in public health, and culminates in a high-level practice-based project. This course is the second in the series of experiences. Students participate in interactive seminars by key leaders in public health covering current issues and challenges not typically addressed by coursework. [2 semesters required; Pre-requisite: CGH 407A (2 semesters)]

CGH
407C 3240 1 0   Advanced Integrative Practicum in Public Health (Project)
TextbookTextbook
Jay Orr  -
No Room Needed The advanced integrative practicum in public health is comprised of three incremental practice experiences engaging students in health system leadership and management and complementing the DrPH didactic curriculum. The integrative practicum begins with an introduction to the health system, continues with interactive instruction from experts in public health, and culminates in a high-level practice-based project. This course is the third in the series of three experiences. Through placement with an external entity, students synthesize, integrate and apply the skills, knowledge and training to develop and complete a significant project that is meaningful for the organization and to advance public health practice. [Pre-requisite: CGH 407B (1 semester)]

CGH
499 3251 1 0   Doctoral Study (PhD Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Doctoral Study is the continuation course for a doctoral student to complete their dissertation and other requirements for the degree.

CLST
337 3040 1 4   Cultural Studies, Activism and Social Change
TextbookTextbook
Eve Oishi Thu 1:00PM -
3:50PM
Burkle 22 This course introduces students to some of the theoretical writings in Cultural Studies that ground the field in a commitment to social justice and social change. Readings in the course will include key writings that have influenced the field of Cultural Studies, particularly Marxist theory, as well as historical, theoretical and artistic work that covers specific social and political movements such as the prison abolition movement, labor organizing and social movements around issues of immigration, ethnic studies, feminism, and LGBT rights. This course fulfills the 300-level course requirement for Cultural Studies.

CLST
362 3237 1 4   Contemporary Francophone Cultural Thought
TextbookTextbook
Darrell Moore Wed 4:00PM -
6:50PM
McManus 35 This seminar will be an introduction to the work of selected contemporary Francophone thinkers who have become central to the study and intellectual production of the field of cultural studies. Our collective aim will be two-fold: to gain an understanding of how these thinkers formulate problems and questions for investigation as well as hypotheses in response to their questions and to think through the movement of their arguments. We will also inquire into the how these thinkers’ works have been put to use by thinkers whose works were predicated upon conditions of possibility that differ from the contexts in which intellectuals think in and through the French language. We will read and discuss works by Louis Althusser, Roland Barthes, Maryse Conde Frantz Fanon, Michel Foucault, Edouard Glissant, and Trinh T. Minh-ha among others.

CLST
400M 3271 1 0   Continuous Registration (MA Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Continuous Registration is the continuation course for a master's level student to complete requirements for the degree.

CLST
455 3340 1 4   Visual Research Methods
TextbookTextbook
Eve Oishi Wed 1:00PM -
3:50PM
Burkle 22 This class will provide a theoretical and historical background for considering three scholarly traditions—from the arts, humanities, and social sciences—that research about and/or with visualization tools (cameras; digital media) and/or visual objects (art, photography, film, video, digital media). You will be asked to write about and also within visual technologies including the video essay, ethnography, documentary, and new media “storytelling.” You will be asked to consider the practical, intellectual, and disciplinary stakes of translating academic writing to other, non-traditional, visual formats. You will learn to keep an academic blog. (Research Tool)

CLST
489 3041 1 4   Remembering Trauma: Museums, Memorials & Commemoration
TextbookTextbook
Joshua Goode Tue 1:00PM -
3:50PM
IAC Library If the 20th century is remembered as the age of extremes, it has also initiated an age of commemoration. This course examines the role that museums and memorials have played in shaping the general process of coming to terms with past acts of state-sponsored violence, war and genocide. This course will engage with literature from museum studies, from the study of trauma and from the study of history and memory. We will ask important questions throughout the semester, such as: who is doing the memorializing, what purpose does the commemoration serve, and how effective is the effort? Meets MUSEUM STUDIES AND EUROPEAN STUDIES requirements

CLST
499 3276 1 0   Doctoral Study (PhD Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Doctoral Study is the continuation course for a doctoral student to complete their dissertation and other requirements for the degree.

ECON
301 3355 1 4   Applications of Behavioral Game Theory & Finance
TextbookTextbook
Claudia Monica Capra Seoane MonWed 1:00PM -
2:30PM
Harper 2 This course considers how recent developments at the intersections of economics, finance, psychology and sociology help us understand firm and investor decisions, the evolution of industries and financial markets, contractual choices, and the internal organizatiions of firms. Recent work in behavioral economics uses experimental studies of how real people learn and behave to develop economic models of decision-making and performance. Behavioral game theory applies these techniques in settings with strategic interaction. Behavioral finance applies these techniques to decisions and performance in financial markets. The approach differs from the hyper-rational approach of standard new-classical theory by employing more realistic assumptions about how individuals acquire and use information about other individuals and the environment. The models have the potential to explain phenomena that neo-classical theory has difficulty explaining and provide more accurate predictions that can inform firm strategy and public policy. The course is aimed primarily at Ph.D. and M.A. students in Economics, but should also appeal to those from Politics and Policy or Management who have some previouse exposure to economics. The Course serves as a substitute for one of the core courses in the MAPEB program, such as M.A. level game theory or Managerial Economics.

ECON
312 3327 1 4   Behavioral Neuroscience of Decision Making
TextbookTextbook
Paul Zak Mon 9:00AM -
11:50AM
Academic Computing 208 This course introduces students to behavioral neuroscience in order to inform their research in the social sciences and humanities. There is no prerequisite. It begins with lectures on how the brain works and then reviews current research on how decisions are made in the brain, including neuroeconomics, neuropolitics, neuroethics and more. There are also several field trips where students participate in live experiments measuring brain activity

ECON
317 3358 1 4   Game Theory and Asymmetric Information
TextbookTextbook
Joshua Tasoff TueThu 10:30AM -
12:00PM
Stauffer 106 This course provides an introduction to graduate-level game theory and asymmetric information and is designed to meet the needs of students in the economics Ph.D. program. This course will cover static and dynamic games of complete information, static and dynamic games of incomplete information, adverse selection, moral hazard, screening, and cheap talk.

ECON
322 3362 1 2   Behavioral Economics & Institutions Seminar
TextbookTextbook
Joshua Tasoff, Claudia Monica Capra Seoane Thu 12:00PM -
12:50PM
McManus 35 This seminar series will feature distinguished guest speakers who present their recent research using a variety of methodologies ranging from economic theory, applied microeconomics, experimental economics and neuroeconomics, with a particular emphasis on topics that are behavioral or relate to institutions. The community is welcome to attend the seminar without any official registration. Students must get permission from the instructor to take this course for credit. Credit requires attendance and additional assignments. The course is not graded.

ECON
328A 3468 1 2 M1 Programming for the Social Sciences I
TextbookTextbook
Gregory J. Deangelo, Hisam Sabouni Mon 1:00PM -
3:50PM
Burkle 16 This course will focus on building skills in R and Python. We will learn how to program in each of the languages, read in data, access packages, and create functions. Furthermore, we will cover topics such as web scraping and getting and cleaning data. The aim of the class is to equip you with a set of powerful computational tools that will help you in pursuing research, or, industry roles. While having some programming experience before the class will be helpful, it is not required. The class will be extremely hands on and applied.

ECON
328B 3469 1 2 M2 Programming for the Social Sciences II
TextbookTextbook
Gregory J. Deangelo, Hisam Sabouni Mon 1:00PM -
3:50PM
Burkle 24 This course will build on Programming for the Social Sciences 1. We will cover advanced methods in data scraping through the dark web and cover advanced methods in simulation design. Furthermore, emphasis will be placed on applications of machine learning in the context of causal inference. This course will provide you with real world tools to assist you in your research.

ECON
337 3357 1 4   Behavioral & Empirical Finance
TextbookTextbook
Hisam Sabouni Mon 4:00PM -
6:50PM
McManus 33 In this course we will study concepts of corporate, behavioral, and computational finance. We will survey the financial literature on modern portfolio theory, behavioral finance, and financial time-series. Furthermore, we will work with a variety of financial valuation models and learn how to calibrate the models with real world data using the R programming language.

ECON
350EE 3368 1 4   Designing High Performance Organizations Using Neuroscience
TextbookTextbook
Paul Zak Mon 1:00PM -
3:50PM
Academic Computing 119 This course examines the science and practice of consumer neuroscience/ neuromarketing. It presents key topics in neuroscience that are applicable to consumer behavior, including attention, reward and attachment, emotion, implicit preferences, decision-making, and learning and memory. The course also reviews the state of neuromarketing (both hype and hope), exploring existing neuromarketing companies and the tools they apply to marketing, with industry guest speakers. By the end of the course, students should be able to apply concepts in neuroscience to understand and influence consumer decision-making.

ECON
358 3360 1 4   Adv Topics in International Monetary & Financial Econmics
TextbookTextbook
Thomas Willett Tue 4:00PM -
6:50PM
Harper 2 This course explores research topics in a number of areas in international money and financial economics including issues concerning exchange rate regimes, international capital flows and financial markets, and the causes of various types of financial crises. Emphasis is placed on the interactions among macroeconomic, financial, and political economy considerations.

ECON
370 3363 1 4   The World Economy: Trade and Finance
TextbookTextbook
Graham Bird Thu 1:00PM -
3:50PM
McManus 35 The course shows how economic analysis can be applied to gain an understanding of key contemporary global issues. It begins by tracing the evolution of the world economy, covering macroeconomic theory, performance and policy. It briefly examines the operation of the international monetary system and the world’s trading system and discusses the phenomenon of globalization. As further background to contemporary issues, the course investigates balance of payments theory and theories international trade. Amongst the issues that confront the world economy the course examines: the global financial and economic crisis of 2008/09 and the recovery from it; the reform of the international monetary system; European economic and monetary integration; the development gap and policies of international development; trade reform, incorporating multilateralism, regionalism and preferential trading agreements; the economics of global climate change. There will also be a discussion of the future prospects for the world economy and various regions and sub groups of economies within it. An important part of the course will be to develop an awareness of the data available on aspects of world economic performance.

ECON
382 3336 1 4   Econometrics I
TextbookTextbook
Quinn Keefer, Galib Rustamov Fri 1:00PM -
3:50PM
Stauffer 106 Review of probability theory and statistical inference. The general linear model under the classical assumptions. Multicollinearity, dummy variables, model selection, and nonspherical disturbances. Prerequisite: ECON 308.

ECON
384 3359 1 4   Time Series Econometrics
TextbookTextbook
Pierangelo De Pace Tue 1:00PM -
3:50PM
Stauffer 106 This course provides an introduction to modern time series econometrics. Topics covered include deterministic trend models, autoregressive moving average models, vector autoregressions, unit roots, and cointegration. We examine and illustrate various approaches to model estimation and inference, including least squares, generalized method of moments, maximum likelihood, and Bayesian methods. Applications are drawn from macroeconomics, with focus on the empirical analysis of dynamic stochastic general equilibrium models and forecasting and policy analysis with structural vector autoregressions. Students will learn basic forecasting tools as well as how to model economic and financial time series. Prerequisite: Econ383

ECON
386 3415 1 4   Advanced Applied Econometrics
TextbookTextbook
Gregory J. Deangelo Wed 4:00PM -
6:50PM
Burkle 22 This course acts as a capstone to the econometrics sequence in the Department of Economic Sciences. During the semester the students will identify a research project that they intend to include in their thesis. The data will be acquired during the semester by using crawling techniques, which will be taught in an intensive 3 day seminar at the beginning of the semester. The remainder of the semester will be designed as an intensive project with consistent feedback to perform a causal policy evaluation. All students will engage in the enhancing the quality of the research of all other student's in the course by working collaboratively and experientially on one another's programming, interpretation, and writing of the results of the analysis.

ECON
400M 3375 1 0   Continuous Registration (MA Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Continuous Registration is the continuation course for a master's level student to complete requirements for the degree.

ECON
420A 3438 1 4   Behavioral Economics Incubator I
TextbookTextbook
Joshua Tasoff, Claudia Monica Capra Seoane TueThu 4:00PM -
5:30PM
No Room Needed Class will meet in The Hive at Pomona in the Shed room for most classes. On 2/14, 3/14, 4/11, and 5/2 the class will meet in the Vault room at The Hive. Behavioral Economics Incubator will bring students to the research-producing phase of their PhD. Faculty will work directly with students on a research project aimed for scientific publication. This is the first part of a two-course sequence that takes place over the spring and the subsequent fall term. No class is offered during the summer term as part of this sequence.

ECON
450 3337 1 2   Research Workshop on International Money, Finance and Economic Policy
TextbookTextbook
Graham Bird, Thomas Willett Fri 1:00PM -
3:50PM
McManus 35 The workshop is designed to help students who are planning to embark upon, or have already embarked upon writing a doctoral dissertation in the fields of international money and finance or international economics and development policy. It is required for all PhD students taking these fields. Students should have completed or be completing Econ 350: Global Money and Finance The workshop will discuss and analyze many leading-edge topics in international money and finance as well as in aspects of international development. The discussion will be heavily based on presentations on specific topics given by students. In addition, presentations will occasionally be given by the workshop conveners and guest speakers. There will also be 'round table' group discussions of key recent research articles. The workshop will help students learn to critique papers in an effective manner and prepare for their dissertation proposals and defenses and will also give them experience in presenting their ideas in a 'conference style' and in answering questions from an audience of their peers. It will give guidance on preparing research papers for consideration by academic journals as well as by policy makers in governmental, international and commercial organizations. Both students auditing and those taking it for credit are expected to attend regularly. Students taking the course for credit are required to prepare and present several short papers. These will often be critiques of recent literature.The workshop will normally meet every two weeks and carries a two unit credit.

ECON
499 3374 1 0   Doctoral Study (PhD Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Doctoral Study is the continuation course for a doctoral student to complete their dissertation and other requirements for the degree.

EDUC
PCU101 3233 1 1   Anti-Bias Training
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty 9:00AM -
4:50PM
No Room Needed The date of this event is TBD. Likely on a Sunday in April or May. Must be affiliated with a K-12 school. A partnership between the Museum of Tolerance and CGU for professional development training. One PCU unit is earned for attending the full day’s session organized by the Museum of Tolerance.

EDUC
PCU104 3234 1 1 M2 Prof Development: Teaching Performance Expectations
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Sat 9:00AM -
3:50PM
No Room Needed This PCU class will meet on Saturday May 4, 2019 A professional development training session by CGU staff and guest speakers for Master Teachers and Site Support Providers. Training will include how to best support teacher candidates with formal lesson planning, conducting formal observations (including scripting and providing feedback), as well as coaching through the lens of Adult Learning Theory and the Teacher Performance Expectations (TPE). One PCU unit is earned for attending the full session.

EDUC
PCU112 3399 1 1 - 2   Intersegmental Project Site Support Provider Training
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Instructor: Danielle Centeno. Class meets online. See department for meeting times/expectations. Professional development in coaching adult learning, inclusion, and instructional strategies for district employed supervisors (master teachers and mentors) of California P-12 schools who support candidates in teacher preparation programs. 2PCUs can be earned for completing all the required modules.

EDUC
PCU113 3500 1 1   Introduction to Kaizen Challenge
TextbookTextbook
Eddie Partida Wed 8:30AM -
3:20PM
No Room Needed Meets Wednesday, February 20, 2019 only Teachers will receive training on the use of PDSA improvement tools to engage in projects with teams of students. Location: Chaffey Joint Union High School District Office

EDUC
PCU114 3501 1 1   Toyota Plant Tour and PD
TextbookTextbook
Eddie Partida Wed 8:30AM -
3:20PM
No Room Needed Meets Wednesday, March 13, 2019 only Teachers and team captains will visit the Toyota parts center in Ontario and receive guidance and feedback on their projects. Location: Toyota Parts center, Ontario CA

EDUC
PCUI2 3217 1 6   Clinical Induction. II
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Instructor: Danielle Centeno. Teacher Education Students Only. This class is for teachers in the second term of CGU's Induction Program. This clinical course is aligned to FACT and strives to help the novice teacher reflect upon and develop in his/her teaching acumen.

EDUC
PCUIIV 3260 1 6   Clinical Induction. IV
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Instructor: Danielle Centeno. Teacher Education students only. This class is for teachers in the last term of CGU's Induction Program. This clinical course is aligned to FACT and strives to help the novice teacher reflect upon and develop in his/her teaching acumen.

EDUC
301 3189 1 4   Teach Learn Process 1 Multiple Subject
TextbookTextbook
Rebecca S Hatkoff, Claudia Bermudez Tue 4:00PM -
6:50PM
Stauffer 106 Teaching Learning Process I is an introduction to the practical skills of teaching in a K-6 setting. This class is part 1 of a 4-course series that spans the duration of the candidate's Preliminary teacher preparation program. This course provides students with the foundational knowledge, critical perspectives, and practical skills needed to be effective teachers in diverse classrooms. It seeks to counter the adverse effects of ‘teacher savior’ narratives perpetuated by models of teaching and learning that continue to dehumanize and inflict symbolic violence against students of color and other marginalized populations. Students examine their own positionality as it relates to privilege, culture and power as the basis for developing equitable practices that enhance academic learning and promote the social-emotional development of the students they serve. Coupled with research-based principles of teaching and learning, students also gain practical skills related to standards-based lesson planning, classroom management, assessment and accountability as necessary but not sufficient components of teaching culturally and linguistically diverse students.

EDUC
301A 3199 1 2   Pre-Teaching Experience - Multiple Subject
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty TueWedThu 7:00AM -
2:50PM
No Room Needed Instructor: Danielle Centeno. Tues, Wed, & Thurs from 2/18 through 5/3. Dates/times may vary based on the school site's calendar. This is the clinical class associated with Phase I of CGU's Teacher Education Preliminary Credential Program. In this introductory clinical class, Multiple Subject candidates are paired with a CGU Master Teacher in a 5-10 week clinical setting to start developing proficiency per the Teacher Performance Expectations (TPEs). This course focuses on methodology and application of instructional strategies across the multiple subject areas. There is specific emphasis on literacy for all students, including English Learners and students with special needs. Course content includes: systematic instructional strategies, monitoring student progress and providing feedback, motivating students, establishing positive classroom communities, establishing classroom expectations and procedures, instructional planning, and understanding child development as it relates to behavior and learning.

EDUC
301ASM 3201 1 2   Pre-Teaching Experience Special Education Mild/Mod
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty TueWedThu 7:00AM -
2:50PM
No Room Needed Instructor: Danielle Centeno. Tues, Wed, & Thurs from 2/18 through 5/3. Dates/times may vary based on the school site's calendar. This is the clinical class associated with Phase I of CGU's Teacher Education Preliminary Credential Program. In this introductory clinical class, Education Specialist (mild/moderate) candidates are paired with a CGU Master Teacher in a 5-10 week clinical setting to start developing per the Teacher Performance Expectations (TPEs). This course focuses on methodology and application of instructional strategies across the multiple subject areas for students with disabilities. There is specific emphasis on literacy for all students with disabilities, including English Learners. Course content includes: systematic instructional strategies, monitoring student progress and providing feedback, motivating students, establishing positive classroom communities, establishing classroom expectations and procedures, instructional planning, meeting IEP goals and objectives, and understanding typical and atypical child development as it relates to behavior and learning.

EDUC
301ASS 3202 1 2   Pre-Teaching Experience Special Education Moderate/Severe
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty TueWedThu 7:00AM -
2:50PM
No Room Needed Instructor: Danielle Centeno. Tues, Wed, & Thurs from 2/18 through 5/3. Dates/times may vary based on the school site's calendar. This is the clinical class associated with Phase I of CGU's Teacher Education Preliminary Credential Program. In this introductory clinical class, Education Specialist (moderate/severe) candidates are paired with a CGU Master Teacher in a 5-10 week clinical setting to start developing per the Teacher Performance Expectations (TPEs). This course focuses on methodology and application of instructional strategies across the multiple subject areas for students with disabilities. There is specific emphasis on literacy for all students with disabilities, including English Learners. Course content includes: systematic instructional strategies, monitoring student progress and providing feedback, motivating students, establishing positive classroom communities, establishing classroom expectations and procedures, instructional planning, meeting IEP goals and objectives, and understanding typical and atypical child development as it relates to behavior and learning.

EDUC
301G 3195 1 4   Teaching and Learning for Equity And Social Justice. MtplSub
TextbookTextbook
Rebecca S Hatkoff, . Faculty Tue 4:00PM -
6:50PM
No Room Needed Teacher Education Departmental approval required. This class is limited to Seniors who intend to apply to the CGU Teacher Education Program. Program approval is required. Please contact the Department of Teacher Education at (909) 621-8076. This class cannot be taken Satisfied/Unsatisfied. This course provides students with the foundational knowledge, critical perspectives, and practical skills needed to be effective teachers in diverse K-6 classrooms. It seeks to counter the adverse effects of ‘teacher savior’ narratives perpetuated by models of teaching and learning that continue to dehumanize and inflict symbolic violence against students of color and other marginalized populations. Students examine their own positionality as it relates to privilege, culture and power as the basis for developing equitable practices that enhance academic learning and promote the social-emotional development of the students they serve. Coupled with research-based principles of teaching and learning, students also gain practical skills related to standards-based lesson planning, classroom management, assessment and accountability as necessary but not sufficient components of teaching culturally and linguistically diverse students.

EDUC
301GS 3196 1 4   Teaching and Learning for Equity And Social Justice. SPED
TextbookTextbook
Rebecca S Hatkoff, . Faculty Tue 4:00PM -
6:50PM
No Room Needed Teacher Education Departmental approval required. This class is limited to Seniors who intend to apply to the CGU Teacher Education Program. Program approval is required. Please contact the Department of Teacher Education at (909) 621-8076. This class cannot be taken Satisfied/Unsatisfied. This course provides students with the foundational knowledge, critical perspectives, and practical skills needed to be effective teachers in diverse special education K-12 classrooms. It seeks to counter the adverse effects of ‘teacher savior’ narratives perpetuated by models of teaching and learning that continue to dehumanize and inflict symbolic violence against students of color and other marginalized populations. Students examine their own positionality as it relates to privilege, culture and power as the basis for developing equitable practices that enhance academic learning and promote the social-emotional development of the students they serve. Coupled with research-based principles of teaching and learning, students also gain practical skills related to standards-based lesson planning, classroom management, assessment and accountability as necessary but not sufficient components of teaching culturally and linguistically diverse students.

EDUC
301P 3193 1 0   Pre-Teach Learn Process 1
TextbookTextbook
Rebecca S Hatkoff, Claudia Bermudez Tue 4:00PM -
6:50PM
No Room Needed This course is for undergraduate seniors who plan to enroll in Claremont Graduate University's Teacher Education Preliminary Credential & MA Program as a Student on Special Standing. This 14-month program prepares K-12 teachers to work in elementary, middle and high schools as general education and special education teachers. This course cannot be taken pass/fail. This course is part 1 of the first academic course in CGU’s Teacher Preparation Program, TLP I for those interested in earning a Multiple Subject, Single Subject, or Education Specialist credential. It is designed to prepare teachers to create positive classroom environments and design/implement active rather than passive learning activities that foster academic excellence in K-12 youth. The course builds an awareness in teacher candidates of the special challenges and rewards of teaching in a multicultural environment and addresses the planning required for optimal learning.  Course requirements and expectations will be handed out at the beginning of the class. Students with questions about the course or CGU's Teacher Education Program are encouraged to contact CGU's Department of Teacher Education at 909/621-8076.

EDUC
301S 3192 1 4   Teach Learn Process 1 Special Education
TextbookTextbook
Rebecca S Hatkoff, Claudia Bermudez Tue 4:00PM -
6:50PM
No Room Needed Teaching Learning Process I is an introduction to the practical skills of teaching in a special education K-12 setting. This class is part 1 of a 4-course series that spans the duration of the candidate's Preliminary teacher preparation program. This course provides students with the foundational knowledge, critical perspectives, and practical skills needed to be effective teachers in diverse classrooms. It seeks to counter the adverse effects of ‘teacher savior’ narratives perpetuated by models of teaching and learning that continue to dehumanize and inflict symbolic violence against students of color and other marginalized populations. Students examine their own positionality as it relates to privilege, culture and power as the basis for developing equitable practices that enhance academic learning and promote the social-emotional development of the students they serve. Coupled with research-based principles of teaching and learning, students also gain practical skills related to standards-based lesson planning, classroom management, assessment and accountability as necessary but not sufficient components of teaching culturally and linguistically diverse students.

EDUC
302 3190 1 4   Teach Learn Process 1 Single Subject
TextbookTextbook
Rebecca S Hatkoff, Claudia Bermudez Tue 4:00PM -
6:50PM
No Room Needed Teaching Learning Process I is an introduction to the practical skills of teaching in a single subject (typically middle- or high school) setting. This class is part 1 of a 4-course series that spans the duration of the candidate's Preliminary teacher preparation program. This course provides students with the foundational knowledge, critical perspectives, and practical skills needed to be effective teachers in diverse classrooms. It seeks to counter the adverse effects of ‘teacher savior’ narratives perpetuated by models of teaching and learning that continue to dehumanize and inflict symbolic violence against students of color and other marginalized populations. Students examine their own positionality as it relates to privilege, culture and power as the basis for developing equitable practices that enhance academic learning and promote the social-emotional development of the students they serve. Coupled with research-based principles of teaching and learning, students also gain practical skills related to standards-based lesson planning, classroom management, assessment and accountability as necessary but not sufficient components of teaching culturally and linguistically diverse students.

EDUC
302A 3204 1 2   Pre-Teaching Experience - Single Subject
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty TueWedThu 7:00AM -
2:50PM
No Room Needed Instructor: Danielle Centeno. Tues, Wed, & Thurs from 2/18 through 5/3. Dates/times may vary based on the school site's calendar. This is the clinical class associated with Phase I of CGU's Teacher Education Preliminary Credential Program. In this introductory clinical class, single-subject candidates are paired with a CGU Master Teacher in a discipline-specific 5-10 week clinical setting to start developing proficiency per the Teacher Performance Expectations (TPEs). This course focuses on methodology and application of instructional strategies across content-specific subject areas. There is specific emphasis on literacy for all students, including English Learners and students with special needs. Course content includes: systematic instructional strategies, monitoring student progress and providing feedback, motivating students, establishing positive classroom communities, establishing classroom expectations and procedures, instructional planning, and understanding child development as it relates to behavior and learning.

EDUC
302G 3197 1 4   Teaching and Learning for Equity And Social Justice. SnglSub
TextbookTextbook
Rebecca S Hatkoff, Claudia Bermudez Tue 4:00PM -
6:50PM
No Room Needed This class is limited to Seniors who intend to apply to the CGU Teacher Education Program. Program approval is required. Please contact the Department of Teacher Education at (909) 621-8076. This class cannot be taken Satisfied/Unsatisfied. This course provides students with the foundational knowledge, critical perspectives, and practical skills needed to be effective teachers in diverse single-subject settings (typically middle- or high-school level) classrooms. It seeks to counter the adverse effects of ‘teacher savior’ narratives perpetuated by models of teaching and learning that continue to dehumanize and inflict symbolic violence against students of color and other marginalized populations. Students examine their own positionality as it relates to privilege, culture and power as the basis for developing equitable practices that enhance academic learning and promote the social-emotional development of the students they serve. Coupled with research-based principles of teaching and learning, students also gain practical skills related to standards-based lesson planning, classroom management, assessment and accountability as necessary but not sufficient components of teaching culturally and linguistically diverse students.

EDUC
305 3167 1 2   Teach Learn Process 3: Multiple Subject
TextbookTextbook
Claudia Bermudez Sat 8:30AM -
3:20PM
Albrecht Auditorium Class meets on Saturday; 1/26, 3/23, 4/13, 4/27, 5/4 The third in a four-part series, this course is designed to further prepare candidates for working within the K-12 school system. TLPIII deepens the candidates understanding of the cultures of school and community and how both influence the success of students in their classrooms. Developing meaningful interactions with families and ways they contribute to their teaching. Candidates will additionally deepen their understanding of assessment measures, specifically curriculum-based measurement, and progress monitoring and apply their understanding to a variety of situations to effectively meet the individual needs of students in their classroom. Students will develop skills for addressing conflict within the classroom and school. Candidates have the opportunity to hone their leadership and collaboration skills as they continue to work within multi-disciplinary teams.

EDUC
305A 3170 1 2   Internship Teaching 2: Multiple Subject
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Instructor: Danielle Centeno This class is for candidates working in schools as "interns" or "residents." EDUC 305A, 306A, 305ASm, and 305ASs are for interns. EDUC 305C, 306C, 305CSm, and 305CSs are for residents. This is the second class in a two-course series and accompanies Teaching/Learning Process III. Candidates must have a passing grade in the first course in order to enroll. The focus of this course is on assessment planning and progress monitoring, meeting the needs of learners with special needs, health and wellness strategies for successful classroom environments, restorative justice strategies and working with stakeholders. Interns are employed as the teacher of record and are supported by a district-employed Site Support Provider. Residents work with a CGU-trained, district-employed Master Teacher. Both are mentored by CGU Faculty Advisors. Candidates self-assess strengths and areas for growth for proficiency in the TPEs by collecting artifacts and reflecting on their teaching practice.

EDUC
305ASM 3171 1 2   Internship Teaching 2: Special Education Mild/Moderate
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Instructor: Danielle Centeno This class is for candidates working in schools as "interns" or "residents." EDUC 305A, 306A, 305ASm, and 305ASs are for interns. EDUC 305C, 306C, 305CSm, and 305CSs are for residents. This is the second class in a two-course series and accompanies Teaching/Learning Process III. Candidates must have a passing grade in the first course in order to enroll. The focus of this course is on assessment planning and progress monitoring, meeting the needs of learners with special needs, health and wellness strategies for successful classroom environments, restorative justice strategies and working with stakeholders. Interns are employed as the teacher of record and are supported by a district-employed Site Support Provider. Residents work with a CGU-trained, district-employed Master Teacher. Both are mentored by CGU Faculty Advisors. Candidates self-assess strengths and areas for growth for proficiency in the TPEs by collecting artifacts and reflecting on their teaching practice.

EDUC
305ASS 3172 1 2   Internship Teaching 2: Special Education Mod/Severe
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Instructor: Danielle Centeno This class is for candidates working in schools as "interns" or "residents." EDUC 305A, 306A, 305ASm, and 305ASs are for interns. EDUC 305C, 306C, 305CSm, and 305CSs are for residents. This is the second class in a two-course series and accompanies Teaching/Learning Process III. Candidates must have a passing grade in the first course in order to enroll. The focus of this course is on assessment planning and progress monitoring, meeting the needs of learners with special needs, health and wellness strategies for successful classroom environments, restorative justice strategies and working with stakeholders. Interns are employed as the teacher of record and are supported by a district-employed Site Support Provider. Residents work with a CGU-trained, district-employed Master Teacher. Both are mentored by CGU Faculty Advisors. Candidates self-assess strengths and areas for growth for proficiency in the TPEs by collecting artifacts and reflecting on their teaching practice.

EDUC
305B 3174 1 2   Student Teaching 2: Multiple Subject
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Instructor: Danielle Centeno This clinical class is designed to give students who aren't yet eligible for an "internship" or a "residency" time in a classroom in order to gain authentic context in order to understand and participate in university-based theoretical discussions. This class allows candidates to complete assignments that necessitate access to a clinical setting.

EDUC
305BSM 3177 1 2   Student Teaching 2: Special Education Mild/Moderate
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
TBA Instructor: Danielle Centeno This clinical class is designed to give students who aren't yet eligible for an "internship" or a "residency" time in a classroom in order to gain authentic context in order to understand university-based theoretical discussions. This class allows candidates to complete assignments that necessitate access to a clinical setting.

EDUC
305BSS 3178 1 2   Student Teaching 2: Special Education Moderate/Severe
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Instructor: Danielle Centeno This clinical class is designed to give students who aren't yet eligible for an "internship" or a "residency" time in a classroom in order to gain authentic context in order to understand university-based theoretical discussions. This class allows candidates to complete assignments that necessitate access to a clinical setting.

EDUC
305C 3179 1 2   Residency Teaching 2: Multiple Subject
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Instructor: Danielle Centeno This class is for candidates working in schools as "interns" or "residents." EDUC 305A, 306A, 305ASm, and 305ASs are for interns. EDUC 305C, 306C, 305CSm, and 305CSs are for residents. This is the second class in a two-course series and accompanies Teaching/Learning Process III. Candidates must have a passing grade in the first course in order to enroll. The focus of this course is on assessment planning and progress monitoring, meeting the needs of learners with special needs, health and wellness strategies for successful classroom environments, restorative justice strategies and working with stakeholders. Interns are employed as the teacher of record and are supported by a district-employed Site Support Provider. Residents work with a CGU-trained, district-employed Master Teacher. Both are mentored by CGU Faculty Advisors. Candidates self-assess strengths and areas for growth for proficiency in the TPEs by collecting artifacts and reflecting on their teaching practice.

EDUC
305CSM 3261 1 2   Residency Teaching 2: Special Education Mild/Moderate
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Instructor: Danielle Centeno This class is for candidates working in schools as "interns" or "residents." EDUC 305A, 306A, 305ASm, and 305ASs are for interns. EDUC 305C, 306C, 305CSm, and 305CSs are for residents. This is the second class in a two-course series and accompanies Teaching/Learning Process III. Candidates must have a passing grade in the first course in order to enroll. The focus of this course is on assessment planning and progress monitoring, meeting the needs of learners with special needs, health and wellness strategies for successful classroom environments, restorative justice strategies and working with stakeholders. Interns are employed as the teacher of record and are supported by a district-employed Site Support Provider. Residents work with a CGU-trained, district-employed Master Teacher. Both are mentored by CGU Faculty Advisors. Candidates self-assess strengths and areas for growth for proficiency in the TPEs by collecting artifacts and reflecting on their teaching practice

EDUC
305CSS 3183 1 2   Residency Teaching 2: Special Education Moderate/Severe
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Instructor: Danielle Centeno This class is for candidates working in schools as "interns" or "residents." EDUC 305A, 306A, 305ASm, and 305ASs are for interns. EDUC 305C, 306C, 305CSm, and 305CSs are for residents. This is the second class in a two-course series and accompanies Teaching/Learning Process III. Candidates must have a passing grade in the first course in order to enroll. The focus of this course is on assessment planning and progress monitoring, meeting the needs of learners with special needs, health and wellness strategies for successful classroom environments, restorative justice strategies and working with stakeholders. Interns are employed as the teacher of record and are supported by a district-employed Site Support Provider. Residents work with a CGU-trained, district-employed Master Teacher. Both are mentored by CGU Faculty Advisors. Candidates self-assess strengths and areas for growth for proficiency in the TPEs by collecting artifacts and reflecting on their teaching practice.

EDUC
305S 3168 1 2   Teach Learn Process 3: Special Education
TextbookTextbook
Jennifer Strom, Claudia Bermudez Sat 8:30AM -
3:20PM
Stauffer 106 Class meets on Saturday; 1/26, 3/23, 4/13, 4/27, 5/4 The third in a four-part series, this course is designed to further prepare candidates for working within the K-12 school system. TLPIII deepens the candidates understanding of the cultures of school and community, and how both influence the success of students in their classrooms. Developing meaningful interactions with families and ways they contribute to their teaching. Candidates will additionally deepen their understanding of assessment measures, specifically curriculum-based measurement, progress monitoring and apply their understanding to a variety of situations to effectively meet the individual needs of students in their classroom. Students will develop skills for addressing conflict within the classroom and school. Candidates have the opportunity to hone their leadership and collaboration skills as they continue to work within multi-disciplinary teams.

EDUC
306 3169 1 2   Teach Learn Process 3: Single Subject
TextbookTextbook
Claudia Bermudez Sat 8:30AM -
3:20PM
Stauffer 110 Class meets on Saturday; 1/26, 3/23, 4/13, 4/27, 5/4 The third in a four-part series, this course is designed to further prepare candidates for working within the K-12 school system. TLPIII deepens the candidates understanding of the cultures of school and community and how both influence the success of students in their classrooms. Developing meaningful interactions with families and ways they contribute to their teaching. Candidates will additionally deepen their understanding of assessment measures, specifically curriculum-based measurement, progress monitoring and apply their understanding to a variety of situations to effectively meet the individual needs of students in their classroom. Students will develop skills for addressing conflict within the classroom and school. Candidates have the opportunity to hone their leadership and collaboration skills as they continue to work within multi-disciplinary teams.

EDUC
306A 3173 1 2   Internship Teaching 2: Single Subject
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Instructor: Danielle Centeno This class is for candidates working in schools as "interns" or "residents." EDUC 305A, 306A, 305ASm, and 305ASs are for interns. EDUC 305C, 306C, 305CSm, and 305CSs are for residents. This is the second class in a two-course series and accompanies Teaching/Learning Process III. Candidates must have a passing grade in the first course in order to enroll. The focus of this course is on assessment planning and progress monitoring, meeting the needs of learners with special needs, health and wellness strategies for successful classroom environments, restorative justice strategies and working with stakeholders. Interns are employed as the teacher of record and are supported by a district-employed Site Support Provider. Residents work with a CGU-trained, district-employed Master Teacher. Both are mentored by CGU Faculty Advisors. Candidates self-assess strengths and areas for growth for proficiency in the TPEs by collecting artifacts and reflecting on their teaching practice.

EDUC
306B 3175 1 2   Student Teaching 2. Single Subject
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Instructor: Danielle Centeno This clinical class is designed to give students who aren't yet eligible for an "internship" or a "residency" time in a classroom in order to gain authentic context in order to understand and participate in university-based theoretical discussions. This class allows candidates to complete assignments that necessitate access to a clinical setting.

EDUC
306C 3181 1 2   Residency Teaching 2: Single Subject
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Instructor: Danielle Centeno This class is for candidates working in schools as "interns" or "residents." EDUC 305A, 306A, 305ASm, and 305ASs are for interns. EDUC 305C, 306C, 305CSm, and 305CSs are for residents. This is the second class in a two-course series and accompanies Teaching/Learning Process III. Candidates must have a passing grade in the first course in order to enroll. The focus of this course is on assessment planning and progress monitoring, meeting the needs of learners with special needs, health and wellness strategies for successful classroom environments, restorative justice strategies and working with stakeholders. Interns are employed as the teacher of record and are supported by a district-employed Site Support Provider. Residents work with a CGU-trained, district-employed Master Teacher. Both are mentored by CGU Faculty Advisors. Candidates self-assess strengths and areas for growth for proficiency in the TPEs by collecting artifacts and reflecting on their teaching practice.

EDUC
325 3226 1 4   Noticing Classroom Interactions and Strategies to Support Student Learning
TextbookTextbook
Nicolle Flores  -
Stauffer 110 This course focuses on developing the "noticing" abilities of teachers in k-12 classrooms with the goal of increasing student learning and achievement and improving professional practice. In the first part of the course, participating teachers will learn of the theoretical construct of noticing and its significance in supporting student and teacher growth. Teachers will have opportunities through the extensive use of video to examine and interpret classroom interactions and practice applying the characteristics of noticing. Further, teachers will use their video interpretations to set professional goals aligned to the CSTPs and to practice classroom strategies to support those goals. Guided by inquiry, teacher participants in the course will be engaged in ongoing analysis and critical interpretation of their professional practice. Participating teachers should have access to an electronic device for recording classroom videos.

EDUC
330 3185 1 2 M1 Innovative Technology: Multiple Subject
TextbookTextbook
May M` Aung Sat 8:30AM -
3:20PM
Stauffer 106 Class meets on Saturday; 2/2, 2/16, 2/23, 3/2, 3/16 The course will examine the role of computers and other emergent technologies in K-12 education with an emphasis placed on the integration of technology to enhance and/or complement research-based instructional practices. This course provides hands-on experience for integrating such tools into linguistically and culturally diverse learning environments to enable all students to gain knowledge in ways not previously possible. We embrace the concept that technology should become an integral part of how the classroom functions and that technology should be as accessible as all other classroom/learning/teaching tools. In addition, candidates are introduced to appropriate instructional materials and technologies, including assistive technologies, to meet the needs of students with special needs.

EDUC
330 3401 2 2 M1 Innovative Technology: Multiple Subject
TextbookTextbook
May M` Aung Fri 8:30AM -
3:20PM
Stauffer 110 Class meets on Saturday 2/2, 2/16, 2/23, 3/2, 3/16 The course will examine the role of computers and other emergent technologies in K-12 education with an emphasis placed on the integration of technology to enhance and/or complement research-based instructional practices. This course provides hands-on experience for integrating such tools into linguistically and culturally diverse learning environments to enable all students to gain knowledge in ways not previously possible. We embrace the concept that technology should become an integral part of how the classroom functions and that technology should be as accessible as all other classroom/learning/teaching tools. In addition, candidates are introduced to appropriate instructional materials and technologies, including assistive technologies, to meet the needs of students with special needs.

EDUC
331 3186 1 2 M1 Innovative Technology: Single Subject
TextbookTextbook
Kara Evans Sat 8:30AM -
3:20PM
Albrecht Auditorium Class meets on Saturday 2/2, 2/16, 2/23, 3/2, 3/16 The course will examine the role of computers and other emergent technologies in K-12 education with an emphasis placed on the integration of technology to enhance and/or complement research-based instructional practices. This course provides hands-on experience for integrating such tools into linguistically and culturally diverse learning environments to enable all students to gain knowledge in ways not previously possible. We embrace the concept that technology should become an integral part of how the classroom functions and that technology should be as accessible as all other classroom/learning/teaching tools. In addition, candidates are introduced to appropriate instructional materials and technologies, including assistive technologies, to meet the needs of students with special needs.

EDUC
331 3402 2 2 M1 Innovative Technology: Single Subject
TextbookTextbook
Jennifer M Wagner Sat 8:30AM -
3:20PM
McManus 31 Class meets on Saturday 2/2, 2/16, 2/23, 3/2, 3/16 The course will examine the role of computers and other emergent technologies in K-12 education with an emphasis placed on the integration of technology to enhance and/or complement research-based instructional practices. This course provides hands-on experience for integrating such tools into linguistically and culturally diverse learning environments to enable all students to gain knowledge in ways not previously possible. We embrace the concept that technology should become an integral part of how the classroom functions and that technology should be as accessible as all other classroom/learning/teaching tools. In addition, candidates are introduced to appropriate instructional materials and technologies, including assistive technologies, to meet the needs of students with special needs.

EDUC
332 3187 1 2 M1 Innovative Technology: Special Education
TextbookTextbook
Teresa Vera Fri 8:30AM -
3:20PM
Stauffer 110 Class meets on Saturday; 2/2, 2/16, 2/23, 3/2, 3/16 The course will examine the role of computers and other emergent technologies in K-12 education with an emphasis placed on the integration of technology to enhance and/or complement research-based instructional practices. This course provides hands-on experience for integrating such tools into linguistically and culturally diverse learning environments to enable all students to gain knowledge in ways not previously possible. We embrace the concept that technology should become an integral part of how the classroom functions and that technology should be as accessible as all other classroom/learning/teaching tools. In addition, candidates are introduced to appropriate instructional materials and technologies, including assistive technologies, to meet the needs of students with special needs.

EDUC
338-1 3306 1 2   Emotional, Behavioral & Health Issues in Special Education, Part I
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Wed 6:00PM -
8:50PM
Treanor Room (Harper 55) Instructor: Miyoko Itokazu. Class meets on Wednesdays from 2/13-4/10. This course is the first in a two part series. Course participants will learn advanced emotional and behavior methodology to supports the academic and social needs of students with disabilities for social justice. Part 1 specifically focuses on the assessment, design and implementation of positive behavior support and intervention plans. Participants will develop the necessary skills to conduct functional behavior analysis assessments for the purpose of designing and implementing a positive behavior support of intervention plan. Applied behavior analysis methodologies as well as differential reinforcements will be emphasized. Participants will collaborate with general educators, parents, and related service providers to make data-based decisions regarding the needs of diverse learners.

EDUC
356 3302 1 2   Seminar 2: Teaching-Learning Communities for CNA Fellows
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Wed 5:00PM -
7:50PM
McNassor Room (Harper 53) Instructor: Deirdre Michelle Dymerski. Class meets on Wed 1/9, 1/16, 2/6, 2/20, 3/6, 4/17, 5/1. Department consent required. See department for details. This is the second course in a series designed specifically for students in the Claremont Native American Fellowship program. The course will support students in their effort to meet the California Standards for the Teaching Profession by exploring 1) various ethical concerns specific to the Native American community; 2) subject matter competence and multiple perspectives; 3) effective pedagogical practices; and 4) their students including their individual strengths, interests, and needs; and knowledge about their families and communities.

EDUC
400M 3441 1 0   Continuous Registration (MA Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Continuous Registration is the continuation course for a master's level student to complete requirements for the degree.

EDUC
405 3229 1 4   Scientific/Mathematical Modeling for K-12 Educators
TextbookTextbook
Adam Landsberg Sat 8:45AM -
12:35PM
No Room Needed Teacher Education students only. Class meets on the following Saturdays: 1/26, 2/2, 2/16, 2/23, 3/2, 3/9, 3/30, 4/6, 4/13 This course aims to provide high school STEM teachers with a hands-on introduction to the art of scientific, mathematical, and computer modeling. It is motivated by the fact that – regardless of discipline – working scientists often find themselves confronted by a common set of questions: First, given some physical system of interest, how does one construct a good conceptual framework for understanding that system’s essential behaviors? Second, how does one go about translating that conceptual framework into a more precise mathematical model suitable for analysis? Third, how does one then transcribe that mathematical description into a computer program which numerically simulates the system’s behavior? And lastly, how does one meaningfully assess and interpret the results/predictions of the computer simulations, and judge the validity of the model itself? Through a series of guided exercises and open-ended problems drawn from many branches of science (including physiology, ecology, biology, chemistry, and physics), the MTFs/TFs will explore these four central pillars of the model-building process.

EDUC
421 3015 1 2 M1 Working With and For Undocumented Students
TextbookTextbook
Eligio Martinez Thu 5:30PM -
8:20PM
Stauffer 110 This 2-unit course is part of the Allies of Dreamers Program and is specifically designed to meet the needs of this Program’s students. (Students who aren’t in the Allies of Dreamers Program are welcome to take this course. It should be noted, however, that students who are taking the course as part of the Allies Program should have already taken EDUC 419 and 420 as there is a sequential order to the curriculum.) This class will prepare the students in the Allies Program to work effectively with the families of undocumented youth. By the end of this course the successful student will be able to understand the barriers facing undocumented students and mixed-status families; develop strategies to help undocumented K-16 students understand and navigate their immigration status; practice providing a safe space for undocumented students and mixed-status families; develop and implement a strategy for better supporting undocumented students and their families. Participants will learn how to do an asset-map for a specific community and learn how to establish rapport with an understandably leery population.

EDUC
422 3013 1 2 M2 Promoting Wellness in Undocumented Populations and The Allies Who Support Them
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Thu 5:30PM -
8:20PM
Stauffer 110 Instructor: TBD This 2-unit course is part of the Allies of Dreamers Program and is specifically designed to meet the needs of this Program’s students. (Students who aren’t in the Allies of Dreamers Program are welcome to take this course. It should be noted, however, that students who are taking the course as part of the Allies Program should have already taken EDUC 419 and 420 as there is a sequential order to the curriculum.) This final course in the Allies Program relates to wellness. The first half of the course specifically addresses how to promote wellness in undocumented populations; the second half of the course addresses how advocates and allies supporting undocumented populations need to maintain their own personal and professional wellbeing. In the first half of the course students will (A) hear relevant stories from members of immigrant communities and review several recent studies that identify and describe some of the most significant and growing physical and mental health challenges facing undocumented population groups in the US; (B) examine a variety of holistic health interventions based on neuroscience research, public health, ethno-medicine, and the behavioral sciences that have been found effective in addressing some of these challenges; and (C) train in specific Holistic Health and Critical Mentorship techniques for working with undocumented youth and their families. The second half of the course focuses on five discreet and yet interconnected areas: (A) the work of teacher leaders and activists, (B) finding the right professional development, (C) finding and building relationships with like-minded colleagues, (D) self-care and (E) resilience. Objectives relate to identifying qualities of teacher leaders/activists; evaluating one’s own personal and professional needs as teacher leaders/activists; determining appropriate professional development for these needs; applying self-care and resiliency strategies to one’s work as an advocate; building and utilizing networks; and reflecting upon one’s own strengths and areas of growth as teacher leaders/activists.

EDUC
424 3331 1 4   Gender & Education
TextbookTextbook
Linda Perkins Tue 4:00PM -
6:50PM
Harper 1 This course focuses upon the historical and current debate surrounding the historical impact of gender on education. It will address the role of race, ethnicity, immigrant status, religion, sexual orientation and social class as these variables relate to gender issues in schools and higher education. The class will address the historical and current “boy problem” in schools and the growing achievement imbalance and graduation rates of girls in schools. It will also review the historical and current debate over single-sex versus coeducation. The course will discuss contemporary gender issues in education such as the debate surrounding whether schools are more “girl friendly” and disadvantage boys or whether schools “shortchange” girls. The class will discuss whether talented female students are now at a disadvantage in admissions to elite colleges and university because of an attempt to maintain gender “balance” on many college campuses.

EDUC
425 3333 1 4   Race and Racism in Education
TextbookTextbook
Deborah F Carter Mon 7:00PM -
9:50PM
McManus 31 This course is designed to introduce and broaden students' understanding of the foundations of racial inequities in education. The course addresses how racism has shaped students' educational experiences and outcomes, and major themes that will be covered in the course are: racial formation, critical race theory, stereotype threat, implicit bias, and modern forms of racism.

EDUC
461 3007 1 4   The College Student Experience
TextbookTextbook
Eligio Martinez Wed 7:00PM -
9:50PM
Harper 2 This course focuses on the college student experience and related literature, theory, and research. Special consideration is given to the increasing diversity of college students, identity issues in college, factors that influence success, and implications for practice in college and universities. Students will have an opportunity to focus on a topic of their choosing.

EDUC
464 3334 1 4   College Student Development: Research, Theory, and Practice
TextbookTextbook
Dina Maramba Mon 4:00PM -
6:50PM
Academic Computing 108 This seminar provides an overview of college student development theory and learning in the U.S. Attention is given to historical and emerging perspectives, relevant research, and critiques influential in understanding students in post-secondary institutions. Emphasis is placed on the integration of theory, research, and practice.

EDUC
465 3335 1 4   Quantitative Research Methods
TextbookTextbook
David Drew Mon 4:00PM -
6:50PM
Academic Computing 208 This course is a thorough introduction to the acquisition and analysis of educational research data. Topics include: conceptualizing a research problem, methods of gathering data, interview and questionnaire construction, coding and structuring data, descriptive statistics, statistical inference concepts, contingency tables/chi square analysis, t-test, one-way analysis of variance, correlation and bivariate regression. Conceptual foundations of these techniques rather than formulas are emphasized; the course can accommodate students with minimal mathematics backgrounds.

EDUC
466 3324 1 4   Quantitative Research Practicum
TextbookTextbook
June Hilton Tue 7:00PM -
9:50PM
McManus 33 This course provides an opportunity for the Ph.D. student to conduct a complete empirical investigation utilizing the conceptual material and techniques acquired in ED465. Students will be expected to develop a research problem based on a study of the literature, design a questionnaire that addresses the research questions and operationalizes the variables, develop a sampling plan, distribute the questionnaires with appropriate follow-up mailings, develop coding guides and enter the data onto a computer, develop an analysis plan, conduct analyses, and write a research report. In conjunction with the analysis phase, students will be instructed in the use of statistical software, specifically the Windows version of SPSS. Seminar papers should be of publishable quality. The prerequisite for this course is ED465 or the equivalent.

EDUC
467 3332 1 4   Applied Multivariate Analysis
TextbookTextbook
David Drew Mon 7:00PM -
9:50PM
McNassor Room (Harper 53) This class requires a permission number for registration. See department for permission number. This course includes a thorough treatment of the conceptual basis, mathematics, and applications of multiple regression and logistic regression. An introduction to multiple linear path analysis is included. Students are asked to implement these techniques with research data. Prerequisite: Ed 466 or instructor approval Note: Permission number required to enroll. Call SES Office (Cece or Maria) at 909.621.8075.

EDUC
470 3006 1 4   Introduction to Educational Evaluation Theory and Practice
TextbookTextbook
Kyo Yamashiro Thu 4:00PM -
6:50PM
Burkle 26 This course will introduce students to evaluation as a field and provide an overview of evaluation theory, methods, and practice, both historically and currently. Students will examine key evaluation theorists and how they define and implement evaluations. We will also explore topics such as evaluation concepts, definitions, and purposes; common evaluation methods, tools, and practices; program theory and logic in the evaluation context; issues of equity, ethics, inclusion, and social justice in evaluation; implications for policy, practice, and evaluation use (and the use audience); and the role of the evaluator’s training, background, values, biases, professional conduct. By the end of the course, students will be able to either design a “Request for Proposals” for a program or policy evaluation, or design an evaluation of a particular program or policy.

EDUC
471 3409 1 4   Quantitative Descriptive Analysis in Education
TextbookTextbook
Lucrecia Santibanez Wed 4:00PM -
6:50PM
Harper 1 Most quantitative research in education is descriptive in nature. This class will introduce students to the knowledge, skills and tools they will need to conduct quantitative descriptive analysis in education. Descriptive analysis can help us understand patterns across populations of interests, such as students, underrepresented students, school and districts. Descriptive analysis answers who, what, where, and to what extent questions that underlie observations about education phenomena. It is a necessary step to conduct causal research that can answer the "why" question, and a good complement to qualitative research that often focuses on "how" questions. Descriptive analysis can help generate hypotheses, prioritize possible mechanisms that cause some programs or interventions to succeed (or fail), diagnose problems, and identify new issues of interest to school administrators, district officials and policymakers. In this course, students will learn to: · Describe data (quantitatively and graphically) · Formulate research hypotheses and conduct hypotheses testing · Estimate population parameters of interest using regression analysis (OLS and logistic) · Use statistical software to accomplish these tasks · Analyze, interpret and write about your results in a way that is easy to understand and communicate to non-quantitative audiences. Students will learn to analyze data and produce reports using STATA software. However, they can also use other software packages (SPSS) if they prefer not to learn STATA. Emphasis is on applied analysis and intuition behind concepts, and less on formal mathematical/statistical theory. Students will bring data from their classroom, school, or district to conduct 5 descriptive analysis projects over the course of the semester. At least one of these projects must use publicly available data from the California Department of Education. Another one of the projects must use data from a publicly available NCES dataset (i.e. NAEP, ELS, etc.).

EDUC
473 3386 1 4   Qualitative Inquiry I: Theory, Models, and Methods
TextbookTextbook
Mary Poplin Fri 4:00PM -
6:50PM
McManus 31 Class meets on the following Fridays: 1/25, 2/8, 2/22, 3/8, 3/22, 3/29, 4/12. The purpose of this working seminar is to become familiar with the theoretical perspectives and purposes that inform a variety of qualitative research as well as the various models and methods that can be employed. Seminar participants will examine selected works in education that have employed qualitative research and relate to their own interests. Application of the theory, models and methods will be integrated as we work as a class to help one another develop their theoretical orientation, research question, and choose the most appropriate model and methods. Participants will develop a brief qualitative research proposal during the course of the semester and develop an interview protocol and conduct, transcribe and evaluate one interview using the protocol. Participants will also hear from graduates who have used qualitative research in their own work that has been published.

EDUC
475 3410 1 4   Advanced Qualitative Methods
TextbookTextbook
Dina Maramba Tue 4:00PM -
6:50PM
Academic Computing 119 Course will include advances qualitative approaches, data collection, application of coding techniques and analysis. Pre req: Instructor approval and completed SES Introduction to Qualitative Methods course. Experience conducting and completing own research study.

EDUC
499 3323 1 0   Doctoral Study (PhD Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Doctoral Study is the continuation course for a doctoral student to complete their dissertation and other requirements for the degree.

EDUC
519 3008 1 4   Higher Education & Democracy
TextbookTextbook
Linda Perkins Wed 4:00PM -
6:50PM
Harper 2 The issue of access and higher education is one of continued discussion in American society. This course explores the notion of democracy and access to American higher education. Historically, American colleges were founded for Protestant white males to prepare them for the clergy, government and other positions of leadership. For nearly 110 years, (1636-1745) only three colleges existed in the nation (Harvard, College of William and Mary and Yale). Between the Revolutionary War and the Civil War (1776-1863), there was a proliferation of colleges founded throughout the states. The passing of the Morrill Act of 1862 by Congress to set aside land grants for each state to establish an affordable public college for the “sons and daughters of the common man” was important step in making higher education available to larger population of students. In 1890, a second Morrill Act was passed to ensure the access of African Americans to public higher education. Despite the growth of higher education, in 1946 President Harry Truman established a Presidential Commission to review the lack of access to higher education to large segments of the American society. This document, entitled, “Higher Education for American Democracy”, published in 1947 noted only 16% of college age students were enrolled in college. The Commission noted that having a small elite group of college graduates jeopardized democracy. It noted the barriers that rural, low-income, religious and racial minorities, women and non-veterans faced in seeking equitable access to higher education. The Commission’s Report resulted in the growth of community colleges, urban commuter colleges, significant changes in college curriculum, and federal aid to higher education (work-study, loans and grants) to make higher education more accessible and affordable. This class will look at American higher education in the 60 years since the Truman Commission’s Report. Some of the topics that will be discussed are: the Truman Presidency and Civil Rights, the politics of higher education, the role of the federal government in higher education, the meaning of “democracy”, the changing history of admissions policies in American higher education, the growth of a tiered system of higher education ranging from the “most selective” to open admissions colleges, the history of exclusion of various groups from higher education, the economics of higher education, and the debate regarding religious colleges obtaining federal funds.

EDUC
580B 3326 1 2   Capstone for Doctoral Research
TextbookTextbook
Thomas Luschei Tue 7:00PM -
9:50PM
Stauffer 106 The class meets the following Tuesdays: 1/29, 2/12, 2/26, 3/12, 3/26, 4/2, 4/23, 5/7. This course is primarily designed to prepare doctoral students for the process of writing their research outlines and dissertation proposals. In addition, it will allow students to gain the skills necessary to critically evaluate the design of published research in their respective areas of expertise. The target audience for the course is doctoral students in the School of Educational Studies (SES) who have completed their first qualifying exam, research tools (i.e., taken qualitative, mixed, and/or quantitative methods courses), and who are at or near the proposal stage of their doctoral programs. Students will be required to work with their peers and the instructor to craft a mock dissertation proposal which will include the following sections: (1) introduction (i.e., purpose, statement, and research questions), (2) literature review map, (3) theoretical framework, and (4) methods (i.e., sample, data collection, data analysis, and limitations). NOTE: This course is required for all doctoral students in SES entering in summer 2013 or later. Although the focus will be on proposal development, it does not take the place of the doctoral advisor and dissertation committee. Students must consult with their advisor regarding the expected format and content of their dissertation proposal. Prerequisite: 62 units of completed course work (including transfer units), two filed research tools, and one approved, recorded qualifying exam. Enrollment Instructions: Students meeting all of the above requirements can register themselves for the Capstone course. If you plan to take the upcoming offer of this course but are still working on fulfilling the requirements, please e-mail Cece Gaddy (cece.gaddy@cgu.edu) and copy Grace Elliott (grace.elliott@cgu.edu) so that you can be added to an informal wait list (used for enrollment predicatability). Once you meet all requirements, you can register yourself for the course through your student portal. In order to avoid a late registration fee while completing the requirements, be sure to register for any other units you plan to take. If you’re finished with coursework and want to audit Capstone, then register for ED 499 Doctoral Study, add Capstone when you meet the requirements, and contact Cece or Grace to change you from ‘enrolled’ to ‘audit’. (Reminder: there is no charge to audit Capstone IF you are finished with coursework and enrolled in ED 499 Doctoral Study.)

EDUC
620 3005 1 4   Urban Education: Context, Policy, and Practice for School Leaders
TextbookTextbook
Thomas Luschei Fri 5:00PM -
9:50PM
Reef 771-2 (1933 S Broadwy LA) This class will meet 5pm-10pm select on Fridays: 2/1, 2/15, 3/1, 3/15, 4/26, 5/3, 5/10 plus 1 hour additional online content between each meeting. African-American, Asian-American, and Latino children now represent the majority of students in public elementary and secondary schools in the United States. In California, ethnic and racial minorities make up over 70% of the public elementary and secondary school population. The education of these children, who are largely concentrated in urban schools, is critical for the future of the American economy and society, yet many challenges—including poverty, language, and an inequitable distribution of school resources—make the education of minority children in urban areas a major dilemma for educators and policy makers. This course examines the context and challenges of educating minority students in urban schools, with a focus on the state of California. Readings and discussion will cover: (1) the context of schools in urban areas and rationales for studying and investing in these schools; (2) racial and poverty-based gaps in student achievement, attainment, and educational opportunities; (3) empirical and theoretical explanations for these gaps, with an emphasis on the influence of school resource inequities, poverty, and language; and (4) the role of educational policy makers, school leaders, and teachers in efforts to close these gaps.

EDUC
621 3004 1 4   Educational Policy for School Leaders
TextbookTextbook
Kyo Yamashiro Sat 10:00AM -
2:20PM
Reef 771-2 (1933 S Broadwy LA) This class will meet 10am-2:20pm on select Saturdays: 2/2, 2/16, 3/2, 3/16, 4/27, 5/4, 5/11. 1.5 hours additional online content between each meeting. This seminar is designed to ensure students become educated consumers of a variety of education policy debates and to provide students with an understanding of the forces that shape educational policy. The course will explore educational politics and policymaking in the U.S. at the federal, state, and local levels. The course emphasizes issues related to education policy in elementary and secondary education, including policies related to teacher evaluation; standards, assessment and accountability; and school reform and school choice. This seminar examines who makes policy for education, how contending policy agendas are negotiated or publicly debated, and what broader forces are in play in policy processes. These questions will be explored by analyzing selected contemporary policy issues confronting education in the United States and placing them in historical context, and investigating the evidence that research brings to bear on the debates. Students will read about these issues in general and explore them in particular cases.

ENGLISH
337 3103 1 4   Modernism in British and American Literature and Film
TextbookTextbook
James E Morrison Tue 4:00PM -
6:50PM
McManus 33 This course examines correspondences and affinities between literature and film, especially in light of the modernist movements of the twentieth century. Throughout, we will look not only at specific case studies of adaptation, but consider the larger questions of cultural value implied in these transactions. Writers and filmmakers to be considered include Henry James, Virginia Woolf, Ian McEwan, Raymond Carver, Stanley Kubrick, Alfred Hitchcock, Sally Potter, and Robert Altman. Fulfills English requirement – British Literature after 1750 or American Literature after 1900

ENGLISH
353 3257 1 4   Milton and the Body
TextbookTextbook
Seth Lobis Wed 7:00PM -
9:50PM
McManus 33 This course will provide an intensive survey of Milton's writings, with a particular emphasis on his highly ambivalent representations of the body and of bodies. Beginning with his early poetic experiments of the 1620s and concluding with his late tragedy Samson Agonistes, we will be reading most of Milton's poetry and a representative selection of his controversial prose alongside recent works of Milton criticism. Topics that will engage us throughout the semester include Milton's metaphysics, his peculiar theology, his complex relationship to gender and sexuality, and his momentous intervention in the Western epic tradition. Fulfills English requirement - British Literature before 1750

ENGLISH
380 3104 1 4   From Angel to Amazon: American Women Writers from the Puritans to the Present
TextbookTextbook
Wendy Martin Mon 4:00PM -
6:50PM
Blaisdell 7 In this seminar we will read a wide range of essays and other non-fiction prose by American Women Writers ranging from Anne Hutchinson, Sarah Kemble Knight, Judith Sargent Murray, Margaret Fuller and Charlotte Perkins Gilman to Ruth Bader Ginsberg, Hilary Rodham Clinton, Michelle Obama and Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez in order to understand the role women have played in the larger political process in regard to race, class as well as gender matters from the Puritans to the Present. Fulfills English requirement - American Literature before 1900 or American Literature after 1900

ENGLISH
400M 3272 1 0   Continuous Registration (MA Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Continuous Registration is the continuation course for a master's level student to complete requirements for the degree.

ENGLISH
427 3105 1 4   Sylvia Plath and Allen Ginsberg in Historical and Cultural Context
TextbookTextbook
Wendy Martin Mon 1:00PM -
3:50PM
Blaisdell 7 Sylvia Plath and Allen Ginsberg are two important innovative and widely read and respected American poets of the second half of the 20th century. We will analyze their work in the historical context that shaped their lives in an effort to gain a deeper understanding of the generation of poets who were part of their respective cohorts, and we will analyze the influence of both Plath and Ginsburg on future generations of poets. Fulfills English requirement - American Literature after 1900

ENGLISH
432 3106 1 4   Post-Colonialism, Islam and the British-Indian Novel: Salman Rushdie
TextbookTextbook
Ruqayya Khan Wed 1:00PM -
3:50PM
IAC Library This course provides an in-depth survey of Rushdie's writings, with a focus upon his representations of identity issues within the post-colonial landscape. The course covers most of Rushdie's novels and a selection of his other writings, including his critical essays. Lines of inquiry that we pursue include probing what is the British Indian novel, drawing out the relevant colonial and post-colonial contexts, examining Rushdie’s mode of magical realism as well as his complex, creative play with ‘East-West’ categories (e.g., Islam and the West, Orientalism and Occidentalism) and ultimately thus stocktaking his indelible contribution to the Western novelistic tradition. Fulfills English requirement – British Literature after 1750. Course may be of interest to Religion students.

ENGLISH
499 3277 1 0   Doctoral Study (PhD Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Doctoral Study is the continuation course for a doctoral student to complete their dissertation and other requirements for the degree.

EVAL
325 3417 W 4   Qualitative Research Methods for Evaluation & Applied Research
TextbookTextbook
Kendall Bronk Mon 5:00PM -
7:50PM
No Room Needed This class is limited to students in CGU's online program. The purpose of this course is to introduce students to quantitative analysis in evaluation research. The course topics include fundamental statistical concepts, such as the central limit theorem and null hypothesis significance testing, as well as common statistical procedures used in evaluation research, such as correlation and multiple regression. This course is required of all students in the online MA program in Evaluation. The emphasis is on the general linear model (GLM), null hypothesis significance testing, and model comparison. We will also critique this general approach and consider alternative approaches when appropriate. All examples are presented using R software.

FINANENG
332 3408 1 2 M2 Fin Tech
TextbookTextbook
Michael B. Imerman Tue 7:00PM -
9:50PM
Burkle 14 This course will provide an introduction to and overview of the increasingly important intersection of financial services and technological innovation, known as "FinTech". Each week will provide a glimpse into the different functional areas within the FinTech ecosystem including: payments technologies, mobile/online banking, robo-advisors and automated wealth management services, technology-enabled lending platforms including peer-to-peer (P2P) lending, etc. The class will also examine some of the new risks that are emerging from the collision of the regulated world of finance finance and the largely unregulated world of technology. Each lesson will include mini case studies and examples to illustrate the technological innovations that have arisen in the functional areas within the FinTech ecosystem, with an emphasis on making the distinction between disruptive versus sustaining innovations in financial services.

FINANENG
339 3074 1 4   Financial Derivatives
TextbookTextbook
Michael B. Imerman Mon 1:00PM -
3:50PM
Burkle 14 In this course, students develop an understanding of financial derivative instruments and their applications to corporate strategy and risk management. Throughout the course, we distinguish between using derivatives to appropriately manage risk and using them for speculation. We emphasize the perspective that derivative instruments are problem-solving tools that, when used correctly, can create value for financial and non-financial corporations. We develop the basic mathematical tools necessary for analysis, design, pricing, and implementation of derivatives in a managerial context. We cover foward, future, option, and swap contracts, hedging, arbitrage, and derivatives-pricing models. In addition, we introduce securitization, real options, and risk management. Through case preparation and discussion, students learn to model and evaluate derivative instruments and risk exposure.

FINANENG
373 3122 1 4   Financial Strategy and Valuation
TextbookTextbook
Zeynep Ayca Altintig Thu 7:00PM -
9:50PM
Burkle 12 This course will investigate the key financial choices of a corporation and their impact on the overall strategy of the firm. Payout policy (dividends and share repurchases) will be one of the topics covered in this course. We will then study the securities issuance decision of the firm, including intitial and secondary public offerings (IPOs and SEOs). Value creation and mergers & acquisitions will be another topic we will investigate. Finally, we will examine corporate governance policies as they pertain to the overall strategy of the firm.

FINANENG
400M 3224 1 0   Continuous Registration (MA Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Continuous Registration is the continuation course for a master's level student to complete requirements for the degree.

FINANENG
499 3225 1 0   Doctoral Study (PhD Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Doctoral Study is the continuation course for a doctoral student to complete their dissertation and other requirements for the degree.

GOVT
287CM 3311 1 4   Women & the Law
TextbookTextbook
Jean Reith Schroedel Thu 2:45PM -
5:35PM
No Room Needed Class held at CMC. CGU students earn graduate level credit. Register through CGU Registration Form-Claremont Colleges Courses, at https://mycampus.cgu.edu/web/registrar/forms . Instructor approval & department authorization on form NOT required for class The purpose of this course is twofold: first, to broadly explore whether gender matters within the legal context, and second, to provide an introduction to the structure of constitutional and statutory legal doctrine that apply when claims of sex discrimination are made. The first part of the course will provide an overview of the American court system and the ways that gender have affected citizenship status. The second part will deal with the major constitutional themes that are invoked in sex discrimination cases and their evolution across time. We will also consider how alternative schools of legal thought address these issues. The final part of the course will examine more closely specific gender policy areas that have been brought before the judiciary. Particular attention will be paid to employment law, reproductive rights, family law, and criminal law.

HISTORY
304 3107 1 4   Introduction to Oral History Methodology
TextbookTextbook
Joanna Poblete Wed 1:00PM -
3:50PM
Stauffer 110 This seminar is designed to explore the field of oral history through both readings and practical experience. It will offer a grounding in oral history methodology, including the basics of interview design, effective interviewing techniques, and fundamental legal and ethical issues. It will also provide an introduction to some of the more salient theoretical issues related to oral history, including how oral history functions as historical evidence, issues of social memory, and the narrative construction of life stories. This course focuses on Women of Color in Southern California. This course fulfills the Oral History research tool requirement, the research methods requirement for Cultural Studies, Religion, and the Women & Gender Studies Concentration.

HISTORY
319 3218 1 4   Curating the Wende Museum
TextbookTextbook
Joeske Segal Mon 1:00PM -
3:50PM
IAC Library In this course, students will closely follow, analyze, research and potentially contribute to one of the major upcoming exhibitions at the Wende Museum of the Cold War: “Watching Socialism: The Television Revolution in Eastern Europe,” scheduled to open in June 2019. Moreover, students will develop their own “dream exhibition” based on the museum’s collections as a virtual project in order to reflect on the different stages leading from an initial exhibition concept to a well-researched proposal. On the theoretical side, we will discuss museum theory and Cold War cultural history, while on the practical side we will discuss and implement all the necessary steps from idea to realization. Course fulfills Museum Studies concentration, European History. Course may be of interest to Cultural Studies students.

HISTORY
331 3220 1 4   The Environment and Indigeneity
TextbookTextbook
Joanna Poblete Tue 4:00PM -
6:50PM
Blaisdell 7 This course explores the intersections of environmental and indigenous experiences in North America. Environmental history, policies, change, and issues that impact the lives of a variety of native groups throughout the region will be studied from multiple disciplines and perspectives. Subjects to be examined will include traditional ecological knowledge, national parks, water rights, legal cases, fishing, whaling, and issues of identity and conservation. Fulfills an American Studies and a Hemispheric and Transnational Studies concentration requirement.

HISTORY
367 3044 1 4   Nuclear America
TextbookTextbook
Janet Brodie Wed 4:00PM -
6:50PM
Blaisdell 7 In this seminar we will explore the powerful and pervasive effects of nuclear energy-military and commercial/ civilian-- on the U.S. from 1945 to the present. Although the primary focus will be on the U.S., we will study some global aspects as well, including Chernobyl and Fukushima. We will use many types of primary and secondary sources to deepen our engagement with the political, economic, environmental, social, and cultural impacts. Nuclear history is already very broadly interdisciplinary but I will welcome students from many fields of expertise. We will read some of the most recent books and articles in the field but also older, classic accounts, as well as drawing from literature, popular culture, art, and music. Students will be expected to write an original, short (15 pages) paper on a topic of their choice (after consultation with me). Fulfills an American Studies concentration requirement.

HISTORY
400M 3273 1 0   Continuous Registration (MA Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Continuous Registration is the continuation course for a master's level student to complete requirements for the degree.

HISTORY
410 3108 1 4   Power and Resistance in Early Modern England
TextbookTextbook
David Cressy Wed 9:00AM -
11:50AM
Academic Computing 119 This course examines controversial political and religious initiatives of the early modern English state, and forms of resistance to them. Case studies range from the Reformations of the sixteenth century to the seventeenth-century Revolution, and Restoration. We will consider various challenges to power, including rebellion, sedition, and non-cooperation, with a comparative glance forward to 1776. Students will write one short analysis of a particular moment or event, and an original research paper combining primary sources and leading scholarship. Course fulfills Early Modern Studies requirement. Course may be of interest to English students.

HISTORY
499 3278 1 0   Doctoral Study (PhD Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Doctoral Study is the continuation course for a doctoral student to complete their dissertation and other requirements for the degree.

HRM
303 3312 1 2 M1 Organizational Development and Change
TextbookTextbook
Scott Schroeder Fri 7:00PM -
9:50PM
Academic Computing 214 Class meets Fri, Feb 22 (7pm-9:50pm), Sat, Feb 23 (9am-5pm), Fri, Mar 1 (7pm-9:50pm), and Sat, Mar 2 (9am-5pm). In this course, you will be introduced to Organizational Development, its brief history and the theoretical models of change upon which the OD process is based. After this introduction, we will then explore the initial stages involved in OD – pre-launch, entry and start-up; diagnosis, assessment, and feedback; and action planning. We will also discuss the specific competencies needed by HR and OD professionals, and the values and ethics that should guide its practice. This course is specifically designed to provide you with the basic theoretical and competency base in OD as it applies to HR so that you are able to assist with and facilitate positive, planned change efforts within the organizations in which you work.

HRM
320 3310 1 2 M2 Planned Change Management
TextbookTextbook
Scott Schroeder Fri 7:00PM -
9:50PM
Academic Computing 208 Class meets Fri 4/5 (7pm-10pm), Sat 4/6 (9am-5pm), Fri 5/3 (7pm-10pm), and Sat 5/4 (9am-5pm). Planned Change Management examines the process of doing things differently in organizations to take advantage of opportunities, solve problems or pursue continuous improvement. Focus is given to models for planned change at the individual, group, and systems levels. The roles of leaders, HR professionals and consultants in facilitating change are addressed.

HRM
323 3012 1 2 M2 Legal Issues in HR
TextbookTextbook
Scott Wheeler Sat 9:00AM -
11:50AM
McManus 31 Legal Issues considers basic statutory employment law and case law developments and their impact on current issues which bear directly on HR administration. The class will review issues of discrimination, wrongful termination, the law of leaves, wage-hour matters, employee privacy and the National Labor Relations Act.

HRM
327 3016 1 2 M1 Ethical Issues in HR
TextbookTextbook
Ronald Smedley Thu 7:00PM -
9:50PM
McManus 35 Ethical Issues in Human Resources explores ethical issues that HR professionals confront with the growth of organizational competitiveness, diversity, and technology. As technological advances allow access to more information, HR professionals must decide what information can be sought for legitimate business purposes. These and other topics are discussed to help develop effective policies.

HRM
329 3011 1 2 M2 Human Resources Strategic Planning
TextbookTextbook
Ronald Smedley Thu 7:00PM -
9:50PM
Burkle 22 Human Resources Strategic Planning is a continuation of HRD 328. This course focuses on developing and implementing an HR strategic plan based on the requirements of the larger organizational strategic needs. Topics covered in HRD 328 are treated on the micro level.

HRM
348 3014 1 2 M1 Internal Consulting
TextbookTextbook
Scott Schroeder Fri 7:00PM -
9:50PM
Burkle 22 Class meets Fri 1/25 (7pm-10pm), Sat 1/26 (9am-5pm), Fri 2/8 (7pm-10pm), and Sat 2/9 (9am-5pm). Internal Consulting focuses on the organizational development role of HR professionals. Steps in the consulting process are engaged through case analysis, and students learn practical approaches to helping clients navigate change effectively. Special focus is given to students developing an understanding of themselves as consultants and agents of change.

HRM
357 3303 1 2 M1 Workforce Planning, Talent Management
TextbookTextbook
Sheilesha R Willis Wed 7:00PM -
9:50PM
Burkle 24 The focus of this course is to gain an overview of the workforce with an emphasis on managing a company’s best asset, its employees. Students will understand HR’s role in the organization. Particular focus will be on planning and forecasting workforce needs, voluntary and involuntary retention, and labor supply and demand. Additional topics for discussion will also cover succession planning for future organizational initiatives, how to identify employee potential, and determine how equipped an individual must be to take on a greater role. This course is aimed at a leader’s role in effectively retaining talent and addressing organizational needs that will ultimately contribute to the overall success of both the employer and employee.

HRM
358 3017 1 2 M2 Staffing: Recruitment and Selection
TextbookTextbook
Jennifer A Jaffe Fri 7:00PM -
9:50PM
Academic Computing 214 Class meets Fri 3/29 (7-10pm), Sat 3/30 (9am-5pm), Fri 4/19 (7-10pm), and Sat 4/20 (9a,-5pm) This course is a graduate-level treatment of recruiting and selecting the right people in the right jobs at the right time. Processes and practices required to ensure effective selection and utilization of talent to enhance organizational competitiveness, while also increasing employee capability to contribute to both organizational and professional objectives will be covered. We will also discuss issues such as external and internal forces that affect recruitment, selection and the planning process. Particular attention will be paid to identifying and placing talent, preparing the organization to leverage the benefits of an effective selection and succession management process and to linking these approaches to organizational objectives.

HUM
348 3046 1 4   Advanced Writing Workshop: MA Thesis, Dissertation Proposal, and Publishing
TextbookTextbook
Janet Brodie Thu 9:00AM -
11:50AM
Academic Computing 208 This class is open to all students, but is highly recommended for Humanities Masters students in their final year. The dynamic of the class is not a traditional seminar setting; instead it is designed as a writer’s workshop in which students serve as peer-evaluators and class-time is used to workshop individual writing projects. Students will develop their own original project that can be a final MA Publishable Paper, Thesis/Dissertation Proposal, Article for Publication, Literature Review, or Thesis/Dissertation Chapter. The course will prepare students on the mechanics of research procedures; issues in interdisciplinary work; re-working seminar papers into scholarly texts (i.e. thesis/dissertation chapter and/or article for publication); presentation of academic research and scholarship in various contexts; publication challenges and opportunities for young scholars. THIS COURSE FULFILLS THE CULTURAL STUDIES MA WRITING COURSE REQUIREMENT.

INST
359B 3009 1 4   Comparative Politics: Regional & Global Power Rivalry in the Middle East
TextbookTextbook
Sallama Shaker Thu 4:00PM -
6:50PM
Burkle 14 The course which is designed as a seminar will explore the current conflicts in the Middle East which has been the center of power rivalry since the Sykes-Pecot Agreement 1916 which was crafted by Britain and France causing ''the most disastrous impact on the region''. The political arrangements and the remapping of the Middle East drawing borders in the sand was described by David Fromkin as '' A Political earthquake that left so many ethnic groups divided which impacted negatively the people and the minorities living in the region''. Unraveling the causal roots of the conflicts and the regional and global power rivalry in the Middle East requires understanding the CHESS GAME which seems to be played in context of the geopolitical and geo-strategic importance of the region. Why are the global powers USA, RUSSIA, CHINA and the regional powers Saudi Arabia, Iran and non-state actors interested in the chess game? We will address together crucial questions: What are the reasons behind the proxy conflicts in Syria, Yemen, Libya and Iraq? Who are the ethnic groups in the region? What is the conceptual theme of 'power' and can we envision resolutions to the conflicts in Syria and Yemen? Why is oil described by some analysts as "a curse"? While we will address why economic development can decrease the conflicts and why Islam is being 'politicized', the seminar will acquaint the students with the importance of UN SDGs which can impact positively the economic development in the region which has been a conflict zone for more than two decades. The students as stakeholders of the future will engage in simulation exercises to develop negotiating conflict resolution skills.

INST
430 3314 1 4   Perspectives in Conflict and Peace
TextbookTextbook
Jacek Kugler Wed 1:00PM -
3:50PM
McManus 31 This class will review current theories of international and domestic conflict including proposals that lead to their resolution. In the first half of the class students will cover alternate perspectives for the initiation, escalation, diffusion and settlement of conflicts. In the second half the discussion will center on papers that propose extensions or new innovative approaches to the field. This course assumes familiarity with basic approaches to the field.

INST
480 3010 1 4   The Nature of Scientific Inquiry
TextbookTextbook
Jacek Kugler Wed 7:00PM -
9:50PM
Academic Computing 208 This seminar is designed to provide an introduction into the nature of empirical social science. It emphasizes the philosophical assumptions underlying the empirical observation of political phenomena, and the strategies for designing research that can provide empirical tests of theories about politics.

IST
303 3037 1 4   Software Development
TextbookTextbook
Wallace Chipidza Wed 7:00PM -
9:50PM
Academic Computing 108 This course introduces students to modern software development principles and practices. It provides necessary academic grounding in software development to support more advanced information systems and technology courses.

IST
303 3259 W 4   Software Development
TextbookTextbook
Terry Ryan Thu 5:00PM -
6:50PM
No Room Needed This section is limited to students in CGU's online program. This course introduces students to modern software development principles and practices. It provides necessary academic grounding in software development to support more advanced information systems and technology courses.

IST
304 3036 1 4   Communications & Networking
TextbookTextbook
Chinazunwa C. Uwaoma Tue 4:00PM -
6:50PM
Academic Computing 214 Familiarizes the student with the concepts and terminology of data communication, network design, and distributed information systems.

IST
305 3119 1 4   Management of IT in Complex Times
TextbookTextbook
Tamir Bechor Sat 9:00AM -
11:50AM
Academic Computing 208 Class meets 9am-11am on 1/26 & 2/2 and 9am-2:40pm 2/9 through 5/4 Change is never off - the business competitive landscape has been shifting in recent years more than ever. Globalization, rapid technological changes, talent and employee mobility, changes in customer tastes, and high pace of new business models. This course offers a fresh perspective to achieve IT Management excellence within the context of turbulent business environment. Since SPEED become to be a critical differentiating factor, students will practice several design principles to build an agile zero-time IT organization that can deliver the promise to the business.

IST
311 3056 1 4   Mobile Application Development
TextbookTextbook
Chinazunwa C. Uwaoma Thu 7:00PM -
9:50PM
Academic Computing 126 Focuses on the fundamental aspects of mobile computing, application architecture, and design. Students will learn the benefits and challenges of mobile application planning, design, development, and management. Students will also acquire advanced technical skills that focus on designing, developing, and implementing a mobile application to mee

IST
324 3058 1 4   Digital Product Management
TextbookTextbook
Xuesong Zhang Sat 9:00AM -
11:50AM
Stauffer 110 Digital product managers lead the entire life cycle of a product. They understand the market and customer needs, as well as the technology, working with engineers to design solutions that deliver compelling customer value and experience. In this course students will learn: roles and responsibilities of a product manager, strategic planning, product roadmapping, lean methodology, market and product discovery techniques, product backlog, product requirements, user stories, Agile methodology, and tools for digital product development.

IST
340 3042 1 4   Knowledge Discovery & Data Mining (Master's students)
TextbookTextbook
Yan Li Tue 7:00PM -
9:50PM
Academic Computing 108 The Data Mining process goal of discovering of nontrivial, interesting and actionable previously unknown knowledge from data in databases. In this course we will introduce students to important concepts, models and techniques of data mining for modern organizations.

IST
341 3031 1 4   CS Insights via Python Programming
TextbookTextbook
Zachary Dodds Sat 9:00AM -
11:50AM
Academic Computing 108 Computational thinking skills are fundamental to Information Science today. IS professionals build software primarily for insight into the systems they oversee. In this course students will engage with the full breadth of CS fundamentals providing those insights. Those fundamentals include computational thinking, software design strategies, the technologies underlying modern computation (circuits and assembly language), and both theoretical models and limits of computing. Programming with Python is emphasized throughout, including functional, imperative, and object-oriented paradigms and culminating in a larger-scale final project.

IST
343 3033 1 4   Data Science Practicum
TextbookTextbook
Ruben E Quinonez Thu 7:00PM -
9:50PM
Academic Computing 208 In this course, we provide a team-based learning experience for students to apply important concepts, models, processes, and techniques of analytics for modern organizations. The students will work on real-world data science problems with industry sponsors.

IST
344 3117 W 4   Data Analytics and Information Visualization
TextbookTextbook
Lorne Olfman Tue 5:00PM -
6:50PM
No Room Needed This section is limited to students in CGU's online program The purpose of this course is to provide students with the opportunity for gaining a deep understanding of the important principles and techniques for translating organizational data into visual stories that can be used by managers to make data-driven decisions. It also provides students with the opportunity to gain practical experience in building a business intelligence application that starts from business requirements elicitation, to data preparation, to visual presentation. Main topics of this course include basic concepts of information visualization, best practices for data extraction, transformation, and loading process, fundamentals of data preparation and understanding, principles of dashboard design, and an overview of predictive analytics.

IST
353 3121 1 4   Cyber-security Practicum
TextbookTextbook
Tamir Bechor Fri 11:00AM -
1:50PM
No Room Needed Class meets 11am-1:50pm on 1/25, 2/22, 3/25, 4/12, & 5/10, and also 11am-3:50pm 3/8 & 4/26. This cyber -security practicum provides students with an opportunity to research and rethink cyber security by integrating and applying perspectives and trends in several topic categories. Students will select a topic about which they do have genuine interest and will be required to submit three research essays and a final presentation. Depending on the topic selected, students will be given practical exercises to extend their learning.

IST
371 3045 1 4   Introduction to GIS Solution Development (Master's students)
TextbookTextbook
Brian Hilton Thu 4:00PM -
6:50PM
Academic Computing 126 This course is for Master’s and Doctoral students. Requirements differ for each group so the course numbers differ. Master’s students must enroll in this course number. This course introduces students to the design and development of basic GIS applications and systems. This course is for Master’s level students.

IST
373 3032 1 4   GIS Practicum
TextbookTextbook
Brian Hilton Fri 1:00PM -
3:50PM
No Room Needed This course provides students with an opportunity to design, develop, and implement a GIS-based solution in response to an industry/organization defined problem.

IST
400M 3061 1 0   Continuous Registration (MA Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Mon 9:00AM -
11:50AM
No Room Needed Continuous Registration is the continuation course for a master's level student to complete requirements for the degree.

IST
405 3120 1 4   Management of IT in Complex Times
TextbookTextbook
Tamir Bechor Sat 9:00AM -
11:50AM
Academic Computing 208 Class meets 9am-11am on 1/26 & 2/2 and 9am-2:40pm 2/9 through 5/4 Change is never off - the business competitive landscape has been shifting in recent years more than ever. Globalization, rapid technological changes, talent and employee mobility, changes in customer tastes, and high pace of new business models. This course offers a fresh perspective to achieve IT Management excellence within the context of turbulent business environment. Since SPEED become to be a critical differentiating factor, students will practice several design principles to build an agile zero-time IT organization that can deliver the promise to the business.

IST
411 3057 1 4   Mobile Application Development
TextbookTextbook
Chinazunwa C. Uwaoma Thu 7:00PM -
9:50PM
Academic Computing 126 Focuses on the fundamental aspects of mobile computing, application architecture, and design. Students will learn the benefits and challenges of mobile application planning, design, development, and management. Students will also acquire advanced technical skills that focus on designing, developing, and implementing a mobile application to meet organizational and / or end-user needs. Students will complete a hands-on project building a prototype mobile application. The course ensures that students are exposed to the most current mobile technologies and examines emerging issues and trends in the field. This course is intended for doctoral level students.

IST
424 3059 1 4   Digital Product Management
TextbookTextbook
Xuesong Zhang Sat 9:00AM -
11:50AM
Stauffer 110 Digital product managers lead the entire life cycle of a product. They understand the market and customer needs, as well as the technology, working with engineers to design solutions that deliver compelling customer value and experience. In this course students will learn: roles and responsibilities of a product manager, strategic planning, product roadmapping, lean methodology, market and product discovery techniques, product backlog, product requirements, user stories, Agile methodology, and tools for digital product development.

IST
440 3043 1 4   Knowledge Discovery & Data Mining (Doctoral students)
TextbookTextbook
Yan Li Tue 7:00PM -
9:50PM
Academic Computing 108 This course is for Doctoral and Master’s students. Requirements differ for each group so the course numbers differ. Doctoral students must enroll in this course number. The Data Mining process goal of discovering of nontrivial, interesting and actionable previously unknown knowledge from data in databases. In this course we will introduce students to important concepts, models and techniques of data mining for modern organizations. This course is for Ph.D level students.

IST
471 3262 1 4   Introduction to GIS Solution Development (Doctoral students)
TextbookTextbook
Brian Hilton Thu 4:00PM -
6:50PM
Academic Computing 126 This course is for Doctoral and Master’s students. Requirements differ for each group so the course numbers differ. Doctoral students must enroll in this course number. This course introduces students to the design and development of basic GIS applications and systems. This course is for Ph.D level students.

IST
499 3060 1 0   Doctoral Study (PhD Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Mon 9:00AM -
11:50AM
No Room Needed Doctoral Study is the continuation course for a doctoral student to complete their dissertation and other requirements for the degree. During the semester students will generally work on: * Research methodology study and deployment * Experiment Design * Questionnaires Design * Experiment system development * Data collection and analysis

IST
503 3035 1 4   Qualitative Research
TextbookTextbook
Lorne Olfman Mon 4:00PM -
6:50PM
Academic Computing 214 The course develops skills for implementing and evaluating the techniques and methods that are used in the various phases of design research. After an exposure to the characteristics that differentiate design research from other types of research, research methods and techniques used in the various phases of such research will be discussed in the context of exemplars of such research. The exemplars will be from a number of information systems areas such as software engineering, networking, Internet technologies, information security, telemedicine, middleware, multimedia and others.

IST
504 3038 1 4   Quantitative Research Methods
TextbookTextbook
Terry Ryan, June Hilton Thu 7:00PM -
9:50PM
Academic Computing 108 This course introduces doctoral students to many of the quantitative techniques employed by IS&T researchers. It does not cover all of the advanced methods that can be found in the IS&T research literature, but it does introduce many of the most commonly used ones. Additionally, the course introduces students to R, a highly popular, free programming language that supports statistical analysis and data mining.

IST
507 3034 1 4   Directed Readings
TextbookTextbook
Lorne Olfman Thu 4:00PM -
6:50PM
Academic Computing 119 Instructor: TBD This course is designed for PhD students to work with their advisors to create an outline for their dissertation. Students will be required to meet with their advisor on a bi-weekly basis to discuss current and future readings to prepare the student to complete their dissertation proposal.

MATH
231CM 3100 1 4   Principles of Real Analysis I
TextbookTextbook
Michael O'Neill TueThu 11:00AM -
12:15PM
No Room Needed CMC class. Instructor consent and CGU Registration Form-Claremont Colleges Courses required, located at https://mycampus.cgu.edu/web/registrar/forms Countable sets, least upper bounds, and metric space topology including compactness, completeness, connectivity, and uniform convergence. Related topics as time permits.

MATH
231HM 3388 1 4   Mathematical Analysis I
TextbookTextbook
Alfonso Castro MonWed 11:00AM -
12:15PM
No Room Needed HMC class. Instructor consent and CGU Registration Form-Claremont Colleges Courses required, located at https://mycampus.cgu.edu/web/registrar/forms Countable sets, least upper bounds, and metric space topology including compactness, completeness, connectivity, and uniform convergence. Related topics as time permits.

MATH
231HM 3389 2 4   Mathematical Analysis I
TextbookTextbook
Mohamed Omar TueThu 2:45PM -
4:00PM
No Room Needed HMC class. Instructor consent and CGU Registration Form-Claremont Colleges Courses required, located at https://mycampus.cgu.edu/web/registrar/forms Countable sets, least upper bounds, and metric space topology including compactness, completeness, connectivity, and uniform convergence. Related topics as time permits.

MATH
232PO 3285 1 4   Principles of Real Analysis II
TextbookTextbook
Stephan Garcia TueThu 9:30AM -
10:45AM
No Room Needed Pomona class. Instructor consent and CGU Registration Form-Claremont Colleges Courses required, located at https://mycampus.cgu.edu/web/registrar/form Principles of Real Analysis II. A rigorous study of calculus in Euclidean Spaces including multiple Riemann Integrals, derivatives of transformations, and the inverse function theorem. Prerequisite: Math 231.

MATH
235CM 3095 1 4   Complex Analysis
TextbookTextbook
Asuman Aksoy TueThu 9:35AM -
10:50AM
No Room Needed CMC class. Instructor consent and CGU Registration Form-Claremont Colleges Courses required, located at https://mycampus.cgu.edu/web/registrar/forms An introduction to the theory and application of analytic functions of a complex variable. Prerequisite: Mathematics 60, or permission of the instructor. Offered jointly by CMC and Pomona.

MATH
245PO 3286 1 4   Topics in Geometry & Topology
TextbookTextbook
Vin de Silva Mon 7:00AM -
9:50AM
No Room Needed Pomona class. Instructor consent and CGU Registration Form-Claremont Colleges Courses required, located at https://mycampus.cgu.edu/web/registrar/form Topic varies from year to year and will be chosen from: Differential Topology, Euclidean and Non-Euclidean Geometries, Knot Theory, Algebraic Topology, and Projective Geometry.

MATH
247HM 3390 1 4   Topology
TextbookTextbook
Francis Su MonWed 2:45PM -
4:00PM
No Room Needed HMC class. Instructor consent and CGU Registration Form-Claremont Colleges Courses required, located at https://mycampus.cgu.edu/web/registrar/forms Topological spaces, product spaces, quotient spaces, Hausdorff spaces, compactness, connectedness, path connectedness, fundamental groups, homotopy of maps, and covering spaces. Corequisite: Mathematics 131 or permission of instructor. Offered jointly by Harvey Mudd and Pomona Colleges.

MATH
250PO 3287 1 4   Statistical Methods for Clinical Trials Data
TextbookTextbook
Johanna Hardin MonWed 1:15PM -
2:30PM
No Room Needed Pomona class. Instructor consent and CGU Registration Form-Claremont Colleges Courses required, located at https://mycampus.cgu.edu/web/registrar/form A second course in Biostatistics. Emphasis on the most commonly used statistical methods in pharmaceutical and other medical research. Topics such as design of clinical trials, power and sample size determination, contingency table analysis, odds ratio and relative risk, survival analysis.

MATH
251PO 3288 1 4   Probability
TextbookTextbook
Johanna Hardin  -
No Room Needed Pomona class. Instructor consent and CGU Registration Form-Claremont Colleges Courses required, located at https://mycampus.cgu.edu/web/registrar/form The main elements of probability theory at an intermediate level. Topics include combinatorial analysis, conditional probabilities, discrete and continuous random variables, probability distributions, central limit theorem, and numerous applications. Students may not receive credit for both Math 251 and Math 257.

MATH
256 3159 1 4   Stochastic Processes
TextbookTextbook
Henry Schellhorn MonWed 5:30PM -
6:45PM
Burkle 12 Continuation of Math 251. Properties of independent and dependent random variables, conditional expectation. Topics chosen from Markov processes, second order processes, stationary processes, ergodic theory, Martingales, and renewal theory. Prerequisite: Math 251 or permission of instructor.

MATH
257HM 3391 1 2 M2 Intermediate Probability
TextbookTextbook
Arthur Benjamin MonWed 8:30AM -
9:45AM
No Room Needed HMC class. Instructor consent and CGU Registration Form-Claremont Colleges Courses required, located at https://mycampus.cgu.edu/web/registrar/forms Continuous random variables, distribution functions, joint density functions, marginal and conditional distributions, functions of random variables, conditional expectation, covariance and correlation, moment generating functions, law of large numbers, Chebyshev's theorem and central limit theorem. Students may not receive credit for both Math 251 and Math 257.

MATH
258PO 3289 1 4   Statistical Linear Models
TextbookTextbook
Gabriel Chandler TueThu 1:15PM -
2:30PM
No Room Needed Pomona class. Instructor consent and CGU Registration Form-Claremont Colleges Courses required, located at https://mycampus.cgu.edu/web/registrar/form Statistical Linear Models. An introduction to analysis of variance (including one-way and two-way fixed effects ANOVA) and linear regression (including simple linear regression, multiple regression, variable selection, stepwise regression and analysis of residual plots). Emphasis will be on both methods and applications to data. Statistical software will be used to analyze data.

MATH
260CM 3096 1 4   Monte Carlo Methods
TextbookTextbook
Mark Huber 10:00AM -
10:50AM
No Room Needed CMC class. Instructor consent and CGU Registration Form-Claremont Colleges Courses required, located at https://mycampus.cgu.edu/web/registrar/forms This course introduces concepts and statistical techniques that are critical to constructing and analyzing effective simulations, and discusses certain applications for simulation and Monte Carlo methods. Topics include random number generation, simulation-based optimization, model building, bias-variance trade-off, input selection using experimental design, Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC), and numerical integration.

MATH
264HM 3154 1 4   Scientific Computing
TextbookTextbook
Ali Nadim TueThu 4:15PM -
5:30PM
McNassor Room (Harper 53) Computational techniques applied to problems in the sciences and engineering. Modeling of physical problems, computer implementation, analysis of results; use of mathematical software; numerical methods chosen from: solutions of linear and nonlinear algebraic equations, solutions of ordinary and partial differential equations, finite elements, linear programming, optimization algorithms and fast-Fourier transforms.

MATH
268HM 3392 1 4   Algorithms
TextbookTextbook
Nicholas Pippenger TueThu 1:15PM -
2:30PM
No Room Needed HMC class. Instructor consent and CGU Registration Form-Claremont Colleges Courses required, located at https://mycampus.cgu.edu/web/registrar/forms Algorithm design, computer implementation, and analysis of efficiency. Discrete structures, sorting and searching, time and space complexity, and topics selected from algorithms for arithmetic circuits, sorting networks, parallel algorithms, computational geometry, parsing, and pattern-matching.

MATH
268HM 3393 2 4   Algorithms
TextbookTextbook
Nicholas Pippenger TueThu 2:45PM -
4:00PM
No Room Needed HMC class. Instructor consent and CGU Registration Form-Claremont Colleges Courses required, located at https://mycampus.cgu.edu/web/registrar/forms Algorithm design, computer implementation, and analysis of efficiency. Discrete structures, sorting and searching, time and space complexity, and topics selected from algorithms for arithmetic circuits, sorting networks, parallel algorithms, computational geometry, parsing, and pattern-matching.

MATH
268HM 3394 3 4   Algorithms
TextbookTextbook
Ran Libeskind-Hadas TueThu 9:35AM -
10:50AM
No Room Needed HMC class. Instructor consent and CGU Registration Form-Claremont Colleges Courses required, located at https://mycampus.cgu.edu/web/registrar/forms Algorithm design, computer implementation, and analysis of efficiency. Discrete structures, sorting and searching, time and space complexity, and topics selected from algorithms for arithmetic circuits, sorting networks, parallel algorithms, computational geometry, parsing, and pattern-matching.

MATH
271HM 3395 1 4   Abstract Algebra I
TextbookTextbook
Victoria Noquez MonWed 1:15PM -
2:30PM
No Room Needed HMC class. Instructor consent and CGU Registration Form-Claremont Colleges Courses required, located at https://mycampus.cgu.edu/web/registrar/forms Groups, rings, fields and additional topics. Topics in group theory include groups, subgroups, quotient groups, Lagrange's theorem, symmetry groups, and the isomorphism theorems. Topics in Ring theory include Euclidean domains, PIDs, UFDs, fields, polynomial rings, ideal theory, and the isomorphism theorems. In recent years, additional topics have included the Sylow theorems, group actions, modules, representations, and introductory category theory.

MATH
271PO 3290 1 4   Abstract Algebra I: Groups & Rings
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty MonWedFri 11:00AM -
11:50AM
No Room Needed Pomona class. Instructor consent and CGU Registration Form-Claremont Colleges Courses required, located at https://mycampus.cgu.edu/web/registrar/form Groups, rings, fields and additional topics. Topics in group theory include groups, subgroups, quotient groups, Lagrange's theorem, symmetry groups, and the isomorphism theorems. Topics in Ring theory include Euclidean domains, PIDs, UFDs, fields, polynomial rings, ideal theory, and the isomorphism theorems. In recent years, additional topics have included the Sylow theorems, group actions, modules, representations, and introductory category theory..

MATH
273PO 3291 1 4   Linear Algebra
TextbookTextbook
Stephan Garcia TueThu 9:35AM -
10:50AM
No Room Needed Pomona class. Instructor consent and CGU Registration Form-Claremont Colleges Courses required, located at https://mycampus.cgu.edu/web/registrar/form Topics may include approximation in inner product spaces, similarity, the spectral theorem, Jordan canonical form, the Cayley Hamilton Theorem, polar and singular value decomposition, Markov processes, behavior of systems of equations..

MATH
274HM 3396 1 4   Abstract Albebra II: Representation Theory
TextbookTextbook
Dagan Karp MonWed 1:15PM -
2:30PM
No Room Needed HMC class. Instructor consent and CGU Registration Form-Claremont Colleges Courses required, located at https://mycampus.cgu.edu/web/registrar/forms Topics covered will include group rings, characters, orthogonality relations, induced representations, application of representation theory, and other select topics from module theory. Prerequisite: Math 271. This course is independent of Math 272 (Abstract Algebra II: Galois Theory), and students may receive credit for both courses.

MATH
275HM 3397 1 4   Number Theory
TextbookTextbook
Arthur Benjamin MonWedFri 11:00AM -
11:50AM
No Room Needed HMC class. Instructor consent and CGU Registration Form-Claremont Colleges Courses required, located at https://mycampus.cgu.edu/web/registrar/forms Number Theory is often considered one of the most beautiful and elegant topics in mathematics. We will study properties concerning the integers, such as divisibility, congruences, and prime numbers. More advanced topics include encryption, quadratic reciprocity, and Diophantine approximation. Finally we will introduce elliptic curves and see how these curves relate to the proof of Fermat's last theorem.

MATH
280CM 3098 1 4   Partial Differential Equations
TextbookTextbook
Chiu-Yen Kao MonWedFri 10:00AM -
10:50AM
No Room Needed CMC class. Instructor consent and CGU Registration Form-Claremont Colleges Courses required, located at https://mycampus.cgu.edu/web/registrar/forms Fourier Series, Fourier Transforms, Distributions. Partial Differential Equations: Heat, Wave, Laplace's, Transport, Schr?dinger, Black-Scholes. Reaction-diffusion equations, solitons, and numerical methods. Prerequisites: Math 60 and Math 111.

MATH
281PO 3292 1 4   Dynamical Systems
TextbookTextbook
Adolfo Rumbos  -
No Room Needed Pomona class. Instructor consent and CGU Registration Form-Claremont Colleges Courses required, located at https://mycampus.cgu.edu/web/registrar/form This course will consider both discrete and continuous dynamics. In any given year it will include most of the following topics: Linear and nonlinear systems; Bifurcation theory, routes to chaos, symbolic dynamics, Sharkovii's theorem and chaos. Existence and uniqueness theory and dependence on data; Hartman-Grobman and Poincaré-Bendixson theorems, Lyapunov stability theory and stable manifold theory.

MATH
287HM 3398 1 4   Operations Research
TextbookTextbook
Susan Martonosi WedFri 11:00AM -
12:15PM
No Room Needed Linear, integer, non-linear and dynamic programming, classical optimization problems, and network theory.

MATH
295CM 3420 1 4   Advanced Topics in Mathematics - Geometric Number Theory
TextbookTextbook
Leonid Fukshansky Thu 2:45PM -
4:00PM
No Room Needed CMC class. Instructor consent and CGU Registration Form-Claremont Colleges Courses required, located at https://mycampus.cgu.edu/web/registrar/forms This course is devoted to exploring topics of current interest to faculty and students. The topic for Fall 2016 semester is Coding Theory. Error-correcting codes are used for information transmission over potentially noisy channels. The goal of this course is to introduce some mathematical ideas behind the design of such codes. The topics to be covered include Hamming distance, applications of finite fields, vector spaces and polynomial rings to the construction of linear codes, as well as connections to optimization problems and related questions. The only prerequisite is knowledge of linear algebra.

MATH
306 3153 1 4   Optimization
TextbookTextbook
Marina Chugunova Tue 4:00PM -
6:50PM
Burkle 22 This course concentrates on recognizing and solving convex optimization problems that arise in applications. The course material covers: convex sets, functions, and optimization problems; basics of convex analysis: least-squares, linear and quadratic programs, semidefinite programming, minimax, extremal volume; optimality conditions, duality theory, theorems of alternative, interior-point methods; applications to statistics, machine learning, and finance. This course should benefit anyone who uses or will use scientific computing or numerical optimization in computational mathematics or engineering (e.g., machine learning, financial engineering).

MATH
351 3156 1 4   Time Series Analysis
TextbookTextbook
Andrew Nguyen Fri 9:00AM -
11:50AM
Academic Computing 108 Analysis of time series data by means of particular models such as ARIMA. Associated methods of inference and applications. Additional topics may include spectral analysis and state-space models. Prerequisite: A course in probability and at least concurrent enrollment in statistics.

MATH
353 3161 1 4   Asymptotic Methods in Statistics with Applications
TextbookTextbook
Qidi Peng Tue 4:00PM -
6:50PM
Burkle 12 Modes of convergence for random variables and their distributions; central limit theorems; laws of large numbers; statistical large sample theory of functions of sample moments, sample quantiles, rank statistics, and extreme order statistics; asymptotically efficient estimation and hypothesis testing. Prerequisites: Math 251 and 252; linear algebra; undergraduate analysis (Math 231 and 232, or equivalent).

MATH
388 3155 1 4   Continuous Mathematical Modeling
TextbookTextbook
Ali Nadim Thu 1:00PM -
3:50PM
Harper 2 A course aimed at the construction, simplification, analysis, interpretation and evaluation of mathematical models that shed light on problems arising in the physical, biological and social sciences. Derivation and methods for solution of model equations, heat conduction problems, simple random walk processes, simplification of model equations, dimensional analysis and scaling, perturbation theory, and a discussion of self-contained modular units that illustrate the principal modeling ideas. Students will normally be expected to develop a modeling project as part of the course requirements. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

MATH
389H 3356 1 4   Advanced Topics in Mathematics: Network Theory
TextbookTextbook
Yesim Demiroglu Wed 1:00PM -
3:50PM
Burkle 26 The study of networks is broadly interdisciplinary and it has many applications in many disciplines including statistical physics, particle physics, computer science, electrical engineering, biology, economics, finance, operations research, climatology, sociology and many others. This course is intended to be a foundational course that prepares a student for further research in network theory. In this course, we plan to cover the fundamentals of graph theory, computer algorithms, and spectral methods, mathematical models of networks, including random graph models and generative models, and theories of dynamical processes taking place on networks, as time permits.

MATH
389K 3158 1 4   Qualitative Analysis of Nonlinear Differential Equations
TextbookTextbook
Marina Chugunova Thu 4:00PM -
6:50PM
Burkle 22 Please contact professor for permission code to enroll. Advanced topics in the study of nonlinear ordinary and partial differential equations. Topics may include: inverse spectral problems for Sturm-. Liouville differential operators, inverse problems for partial differential equations, local and global existence of weak solutions, applications of Sobolev spaces, energy and entropy methods, degenerate parabolic equations, higher order ordinary differential and partial differential equations, the calculus of variations and numerical analysis with emphasize on finite element methods.

MATH
389L 3371 1 4   Advanced Big Data Analysis
TextbookTextbook
Weiqing Gu Tue 7:00PM -
9:50PM
Burkle 24 Please see the course link for more details: https://math389l.github.io/ . In this course, we will start with Big data challenges and examples. Then we will demonstrate how to use mathematical techniques to process big raw data including data indexing, visualization, structuring, representing, and reducing data dimension. We then review mathematical techniques for overcoming big data challenges especially focusing on the mathematics behind the machine learning black boxes. Then we present new advanced big data analytics including functional data analysis, information geometry, statistical manifold learning. We will also teach the students how to select an appropriate existing algorithm or a specific machine or deep learning method, or integrate different algorithms for the big data problem at hand. We will use several examples including market analysis, topic modeling, and anomaly detection to demonstrate the key points involved such as how to select appropriate metric to distinguish between normal and abnormal. We will end the course by demonstrating several examples of big data to decision using mathematical techniques. If time permits, we will also discuss optimal big data-to-decision. Prerequisite:Linear algebra, Multivariable Calculus, Probability and Algorithms, or Real Analysis I (Math 131).We will explore big data analytic techniques using Python, or R, or Mathlab. (For the students in the course, only one of the above is required). Topics will include: Bayesian inferences, topic modeling, network analysis, functional data analysis, information geometry, anomaly detection, manifold learning in computer vision, and statistical manifold learning.

MATH
389Q 3164 1 4   Quantum Computing and Applications
TextbookTextbook
Henry Schellhorn MonWed 11:00AM -
12:15PM
Burkle 12 "This is the gilded age of quantum computing (the Economist, 2018)." "Building quantum computers is a great challenge for engineers and scientists of the third millennium (Nielsen and Chuang 2010)." While quantum computers are not in our homes yet, companies like Google develop them, and universities like USC work on them. Beyond the hype, the main learning objective of this course is to understand the fundamentals of quantum computing: introduction to quantum mechanics, quantum circuits, the quantum Fourier transform and applications, quantum search algorithms, quantum cryptography. We will discuss some possible applications: will block chains disappear with the advent of quantum computing? (Yes.) Since quantum bits cannot be copied, and thus stolen, then will quantum money become the standard of electronic commerce? (Maybe.)

MATH
393 3160 1 2 - 4   Advanced Mathematics Clinic
TextbookTextbook
Staff TBA -
TBA
TBA Please contact professor for permission code to enroll. Normally a continuation of Math 293. The Mathematics Clinic provides applied, real-world research experience. A team of 3-5 students will work on an open-ended research problem from an industrial partner, under the guidance of a faculty advisor. Problems involve a wide array of techniques from mathematical modeling as well as from engineering and computer science. Clinic projects generally address problems of sufficient magnitude and complexity that their analysis, solution and exposition require a significant team effort. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

MATH
454 3157 1 4   Statistical Learning
TextbookTextbook
Qidi Peng Tue 1:00PM -
3:50PM
Burkle 14 This course is targeted at statisticians and FE practitioners who wish to use cutting-edge statistical learning techniques to analyze their data. The main goal of the topic is to provide a toolset to deal with vast and complex data that have emerged in fields ranging from biology to finance to marketing to astrophysics in the past twenty years. The class presents some of the most important modeling and prediction techniques, along with relevant applications. Topics include principal component analysis, linear regression, classification, resampling methods, shrinkage approaches, tree-based methods, clustering, and Bayesian MCMC modeling. The lecture also enhances the ability of using the programming software R.

MATH
499 3284 1 0   Doctoral Study (PhD Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Doctoral Study is the continuation course for a doctoral student to complete their dissertation and other requirements for the degree.

MGT
301SV 3062 1 4   Doing Business in Silicon Valley
TextbookTextbook
Katharina Pick Fri 7:00PM -
9:50PM
Burkle 14 Class meets on Fri 3/1 (7-10pm); 3/18-3/22 in Silicon Valley, CA; Fri 4/5 (7-10pm) This course is designed for students interested in the high technology industry. Doing Business in Silicon Valley combines classroom and field study to explore the unique business culture of Silicon Valley. The first session (to be held in Claremont) will provide an historical context of the techno-cultural and economic circumstances that created and maintain this innovative, productive region. Upon completing this course, the student will: • Understand how Silicon Valley came to be the high-tech hub of the world • See a variety of corporate cultures and how they promote innovation • Assess the future potential of the region including local economic factors • Reach a better understanding of how the California, national and global economy depends on Silicon Valley • Understand how companies synergize in Silicon Valley • Experience the culture of the region

MGT
306 3063 1 4   Business Analytics
TextbookTextbook
Gary Gaukler Thu 7:00PM -
9:30PM
Burkle 16 This course is designed to provide an introduction to statistical methods useful for analyzing data, with specific application to problems of business and economics. At the end of the class, students will have an understanding of uncertainty and risk management, estimation and forecasting, optimization, and the logic of statistical inference. Students will also be expected to learn how to use statistics to think critically about real world issues. Statistical methodology and theory will be presented in an applications context. Ultimately, the goal is to provide students with quantitative tools that can be used in the areas of economics, marketing, financial and managerial accounting, corporate finance, and applied operational methods.

MGT
307 3064 1 2 M1 Game Theory
TextbookTextbook
Jay Prag Iv Mon 7:00PM -
9:50PM
Burkle 14 Decision-making is literally an art and a science. The formal, analytical tools (from economics and mathematics) that largely fall under the heading of game theory allow us to take a rational approach to the decisions that have discrete choices and clear paths. Strategy, brinksmanship, coercion and cooperation are some of the ways of describing the human elements of decision-making. This class will combine many real-world examples of game theory and strategic decision-making with in-class, participatory renditions of games, decisions and interpersonal strategies.

MGT
309 3065 1 4   Business Law in the Creative Industries
TextbookTextbook
Jonathan Jaffee Thu 7:00PM -
9:50PM
Burkle 24 This course examines the legal environment in which businesses operate. The purpose of the course is to provide students with practical legal knowledge on key business law topics, including current legal trends and issues. This knowledge will help students spot potential legal problems as well as make informed and effective business decisions involving legal issues. The course focuses on the following areas of law: agency; the American legal system; choice of business form; contracts; the employment relationship; intellectual property; and, torts and products liability, among other topics.

MGT
321 3066 1 2 M1 Marketing Management
TextbookTextbook
Michael A Kamins Tue 7:00PM -
9:50PM
Burkle 14 Marketing Management (MGT 321) introduces marketing and its role within organizations. It introduces the marketing concept, examines its relationship to other functions in the firm and looks at techniques and frameworks used to examine marketing environments, understand consumer and organizational buying behavior, segment markets and position products. Marketing tactics around product, price, place and promotion are briefly introduced. This course balances important marketing principles with application to a range of different sectors.

MGT
321 3067 2 2 M1 Marketing Management
TextbookTextbook
Michael A Kamins Wed 1:00PM -
3:50PM
Burkle 16 Marketing Management (MGT 321) introduces marketing and its role within organizations. It introduces the marketing concept, examines its relationship to other functions in the firm and looks at techniques and frameworks used to examine marketing environments, understand consumer and organizational buying behavior, segment markets and position products. Marketing tactics around product, price, place and promotion are briefly introduced. This course balances important marketing principles with application to a range of different sectors.

MGT
321 3520 3 4   Marketing Management
TextbookTextbook
Michael A Kamins Wed 1:00PM -
3:50PM
No Room Needed Marketing Management (MGT 321) introduces marketing and its role within organizations. It introduces the marketing concept, examines its relationship to other functions in the firm and looks at techniques and frameworks used to examine marketing environments, understand consumer and organizational buying behavior, segment markets and position products. Marketing tactics around product, price, place and promotion are briefly introduced. This course balances important marketing principles with application to a range of different sectors.

MGT
329 3070 1 2 M2 New Product Development
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Fri 6:00PM -
9:50PM
Burkle 14 Instructor: Jeffrey Schmidt. Class meets on Fri 4/26 6-9:50pm, Sat 4/27 9am-6:20pm, Sun 4/28 am-6:20pm. Understand the new product development process. Gain an understanding and be able to use analytic methods for all stages of product planning, development, launch, and control. Understand effective internal structures for implementing innovation processes. Learn how to assess and improve new product development and management performance.

MGT
332 3407 1 2 M2 Fin Tech
TextbookTextbook
Michael B. Imerman Tue 7:00PM -
9:50PM
Burkle 14 This course will provide an introduction to and overview of the increasingly important intersection of financial services and technological innovation, known as "FinTech". Each week will provide a glimpse into the different functional areas within the FinTech ecosystem including: payments technologies, mobile/online banking, robo-advisors and automated wealth management services, technology-enabled lending platforms including peer-to-peer (P2P) lending, etc. The class will also examine some of the new risks that are emerging from the collision of the regulated world of finance finance and the largely unregulated world of technology. Each lesson will include mini case studies and examples to illustrate the technological innovations that have arisen in the functional areas within the FinTech ecosystem, with an emphasis on making the distinction between disruptive versus sustaining innovations in financial services.

MGT
335 3071 1 4   Corporate Finance
TextbookTextbook
Zeynep Ayca Altintig Wed 7:00PM -
9:50PM
Burkle 16 This course is designed to help students develop an understanding of financial decision making, including investment decisions, financing decisions, and their interaction. The course provides the students with the underlying framework of corporate finance including valuation, market efficiency, portfolio theory, agency costs, and information costs. The course will relate financial management to the structure of financial institutions in the U.S. In addition, the course includes a survey of special topics in finance including option pricing, mergers and acquisitions, hedging, and international finance.

MGT
335 3072 2 4   Corporate Finance
TextbookTextbook
Zeynep Ayca Altintig Thu 1:00PM -
3:50PM
Burkle 14 This course is designed to help students develop an understanding of financial decision making, including investment decisions, financing decisions, and their interaction. The course provides the students with the underlying framework of corporate finance including valuation, market efficiency, portfolio theory, agency costs, and information costs. The course will relate financial management to the structure of financial institutions in the U.S. In addition, the course includes a survey of special topics in finance including option pricing, mergers and acquisitions, hedging, and international finance.

MGT
339 3073 1 4   Financial Derivatives
TextbookTextbook
Michael B. Imerman Mon 1:00PM -
3:50PM
Burkle 14 This course examines financial instruments known as derivatives and the use of these instruments in managing risk. The derivatives market consists of financial contracts in the form of options, forwards, futures, swaps, and a variety of other instruments. The unifying feature of these products is that value or return is ‘derived’ from some other underlying factor. Derivative contracts are used by corporations, investment funds, and individuals to control risk arising from interest rates, exchange rates, stock prices and commodity prices. By some estimates, there is over $1,000 trillion of notional value of derivative contracts currently outstanding. The primary objective of the course is to gain a thorough understanding of various derivative products, including their construction, pricing, payoff structure, and risk management applications. Students will also learn contingent claims analysis, which relies on the concept of arbitrage to develop pricing relationships.

MGT
340 3075 1 4   Strategy
TextbookTextbook
Hideki Yamawaki Tue 4:00PM -
6:50PM
Burkle 14 The focus of this course is on how general managers enhance and sustain business performance. The course covers analytical and conceptual tools that are aids to the development of decision. Its fundamental focus, however, is not on tools but on sharpening skills at developing robust judgments in the face of uncertainty and complexity. The central concept of this course is that of strategy. Strategy is enabled and constrained by the underlying economic and political conditions that prevail in an industry or a country, as well as by the resources available to management.

MGT
345A 3076 1 2 M2 Organizational Behavior
TextbookTextbook
Katharina Pick Tue 7:00PM -
9:50PM
Burkle 16 The purpose of this course is to provide students with a foundation of the fundamental skills they will need to understand, diagnose, and manage organizational behavior in order to attain the organization’s mission more effectively. We will conduct structured classroom exercises geared toward discovering your own strengths and their potential for optimizing your contribution to an organization.

MGT
345A 3077 2 2 M2 Organizational Behavior
TextbookTextbook
Katharina Pick Wed 4:00PM -
6:50PM
Burkle 16 The purpose of this course is to provide students with a foundation of the fundamental skills they will need to understand, diagnose, and manage organizational behavior in order to attain the organization’s mission more effectively. We will conduct structured classroom exercises geared toward discovering your own strengths and their potential for optimizing your contribution to an organization.

MGT
352 3078 1 4   Marketing Strategy and Planning
TextbookTextbook
Bernard J Jaworski Thu 7:00PM -
9:50PM
Burkle 26 The course is designed to familiarize students with the decision domain of marketing Strategy. This includes the purpose and elements of sound strategy, as well as the managerial tools and processes for generating, communicating and implementing marketing strategies that deliver sustainable competitive advantage to a company, product or brand. This course is designed as an applied course with a strong theoretical foundation. It utilizes an emphasis on student activities, supplemented by lectures and case discussions. There will also be a group field project which compares and contrasts the strategies of competing firms. This course gives the student the unique advantage of letting you practice the concepts and skills of modern marketing strategy in a simulated marketing environment.

MGT
360 3079 1 4   Operations Management
TextbookTextbook
Gary Gaukler Mon 4:00PM -
6:50PM
Burkle 16 The objective of this course is to develop a general managerial perspective on the role of operations management in the function of a firm, at both the tactical and strategic levels. The course will offer a broad survey of concepts and techniques in managing operations, with particular emphasis on a number of major operations management issues that can significantly affect the competitive position of a firm in the marketplace. Through the discussions of these issues, the students can also develop a good understanding about how operations should interact with other functional areas such as marketing and finance. We will also study coordination and incentives across multiple groups or players in a supply chain. While tactical models and decisions are part of this course, the emphasis is on the qualitative insights needed by general managers or management consultants.

MGT
360 3080 2 4   Operations Management
TextbookTextbook
Gary Gaukler Mon 7:00PM -
9:50PM
Burkle 16 The objective of this course is to develop a general managerial perspective on the role of operations management in the function of a firm, at both the tactical and strategic levels. The course will offer a broad survey of concepts and techniques in managing operations, with particular emphasis on a number of major operations management issues that can significantly affect the competitive position of a firm in the marketplace. Through the discussions of these issues, the students can also develop a good understanding about how operations should interact with other functional areas such as marketing and finance. We will also study coordination and incentives across multiple groups or players in a supply chain. While tactical models and decisions are part of this course, the emphasis is on the qualitative insights needed by general managers or management consultants.

MGT
361 3130 1 4   Managing the Family Business
TextbookTextbook
Vijay Sathe Wed 4:00PM -
6:50PM
Burkle 14 Managing the Family Business explores the management, family, career and personal issues found in family-owned and managed companies. The course develops the student’s understanding of these organizations and skills to address the challenges family companies and families in business face. This course is intended for students whose family owns a business and those who are interested in family businesses and may work with them as a non-family manager, consultant, investment banker, private banker or in other roles

MGT
366 3003 1 2 M2 Leadership Ethics and Corporate Social Responsibility
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Fri 6:00PM -
9:50PM
Burkle 16 Instructor: TBD. Class meets on Fri 4/12 (6-9:50pm), Sat 4/13 (9am-6:20pm), Sun 4/14 (9am-6:20pm). This course examines individual, organizational, and societal forces that shape ethical behavior in business. We examine "Who am I?", "Who are we?", and "What kind of company are we?" ethical challenges. Students will gain a solid understanding of the role of ethics in leadership and will address the challenge of managing tradeoffs in ethical decision making. Starting with bounded ethical decision making and the role of corporate culture in shaping ethical actions, we conclude by considering the impact of corporate social responsibility and the triple bottom line in shaping corporate values.

MGT
372 3081 1 2 M1 Sustainability for Strategic Advantage
TextbookTextbook
Christopher Laszlo Fri 6:00PM -
9:50PM
Burkle 14 Class meets Fri 2/8 (6pm-9:50pm), Sat 2/9 (9am-6:20pm), Sun 2/10 (9am-6:20pm) Sustainability issues such as energy and food security, water, chemical toxicity, climate change and poverty are introducing greater levels of complexity into strategy decision-making and often have far-reaching implications in today’s competitive environments. Pressing ecological and social challenges are becoming business opportunities. Stakeholder value – based on the economic, environmental, and social impacts a company has on its diverse constituents – is a rapidly growing source of competitive advantage. Taking advantage of this source, however, requires a change in leadership and management approaches to integrating stakeholder value throughout the business. Case studies of leading mainstream companies are used to analyze how business value is created for a range of social, health and environmental initiatives. Participants will look at sustainability strategies that reduce risks, drive down costs, create new revenue streams, serve new markets, and position companies to take advantage of changing societal expectations. Environmental issues such as climate change are covered along with social issues such as global poverty. Participants acquire competencies required to make effective business decisions based on integrating sustainability into the core of a company’s value added activities.

MGT
373 3082 1 4   Financial Strategy and Valuation
TextbookTextbook
Zeynep Ayca Altintig Thu 7:00PM -
9:50PM
Burkle 12 This course will investigate the key financial choices of a corporation and their impact on the overall strategy of the firm. Payout policy (dividends and share repurchases) will be one of the topics covered in this course. We will then study the securities issuance decision of the firm, including intitial and secondary public offerings (IPOs and SEOs). Value creation and mergers & acquisitions will be another topic we will investigate. Finally, we will examine corporate governance policies as they pertain to the overall strategy of the firm.

MGT
375 3083 1 4   Global Supply Chain Management
TextbookTextbook
Tathagata Dasgupta Sat 9:00AM -
11:50AM
Stauffer 106 Understanding key supply chain foundations is crucial to any company's success and profitability. In this class executives will define the supply chain and its significant impact on all aspects of their business while gaining an understanding of the synchronism and synergism of all its components. This Supply Chain Management class has been developed after incorporating learning from several executive workshops in the industry to benefit a wide range of positions and responsibilities. For professionals with specific functional experience, this workshop provides insight into the other aspects of the supply chain. For people who are new to the field -- at either leadership, executive, or managerial levels -- the scope and perspective of these concepts are indispensable.

MGT
378 3295 1 2 M2 Social Media Analytics
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Sat 9:00AM -
3:50PM
Academic Computing 214 Class meets on Sat 4/6 9am-4pm, Sat 4/13 9am-3pm, Sat 5/4 9am-3pm, Sat 5/11 9am-3pm This course helps marketeers and product managers to upgrade their skill set for the future of digital and social marketing. We will learn to expand our analytics toolkit from descriptive analytics (running Google Analytics) and predictive analytics (conducting A/B testing) to prescriptive analytics (building a recommendation engine). You will build a basic recommendation engine (using Microsoft Azure Machine Learning) that can help a product sell itself or find look-alike users. The course is broken into parts so that you can evolve your assignment step-by-step or session-by-session with each lecture providing new tools for the next step.

MGT
379B 3293 1 1   Leadership Practicum
TextbookTextbook
Katharina Pick Fri 1:00PM -
3:50PM
Burkle 14 Class meets on Fri 1/25, 2/22, 4/12, 4/26 1-3:50pm This practicum is an underlying leadership development substrate to our technical education and leadership curriculum. Through intensive, lab-based work, students will learn the emotional and behavioral skills to begin a life-long practice of leadership. This practicum reflects the philosophy articulated by Warren Bennis that leadership cannot be taught, but rather must be learned. The practicum will not "create leaders" but rather will help students develop the tools, practices and insights that are required if one is to become a leader over time.

MGT
379B 3294 2 1   Leadership Practicum
TextbookTextbook
Katharina Pick Fri 7:00PM -
9:50PM
Burkle 24 Class meets on Fri 1/25, 2/22, 4/12, 4/26 7-10pm This practicum is an underlying leadership development substrate to our technical education and leadership curriculum. Through intensive, lab-based work, students will learn the emotional and behavioral skills to begin a life-long practice of leadership. This practicum reflects the philosophy articulated by Warren Bennis that leadership cannot be taught, but rather must be learned. The practicum will not "create leaders" but rather will help students develop the tools, practices and insights that are required if one is to become a leader over time.

MGT
380 3089 1 2 M1 Drucker Philosophy
TextbookTextbook
Bernard J Jaworski Fri 6:00PM -
9:50PM
Burkle 16 Class meets on Fri 2/1 6-9:50pm, Sat 2/2 9am-6:20pm, Sat 3/2 9am-6:20pm This course focuses on self-management, professionalization, written communication, and critical thinking

MGT
380B 3090 1 1   Career Practicum
TextbookTextbook
Kristine M Kawamura Thu 1:00PM -
3:50PM
Burkle 26 Class meets on Thursday (1-3:50pm) 2/7, 3/7, 4/18, & 5/9 Drucker famously said: "Management is neither an art nor a science. It is a practice." The goal of this 2-unit practicum is to help students enhance their own management experiences. Students can select from a menu of options and are encouraged to engage in as much variety as possible. The options include: an introduction to the practice of management, working in an internship or corporate residency, starting a business, undertaking a consulting project, shadowing a C- Suite executive, or serving on a Board.

MGT
380B 3091 2 1   Career Practicum
TextbookTextbook
Kristine M Kawamura Fri 1:00PM -
3:50PM
Burkle 24 Class meets on Fri (1-3:50pm) 2/8, 3/8, 4/19, 5/10 Drucker famously said: "Management is neither an art nor a science. It is a practice." The goal of this 2-unit practicum is to help students enhance their own management experiences. Students can select from a menu of options and are encouraged to engage in as much variety as possible. The options include: an introduction to the practice of management, working in an internship or corporate residency, starting a business, undertaking a consulting project, shadowing a C- Suite executive, or serving on a Board.

MGT
380B 3092 3 1   Career Practicum
TextbookTextbook
Kristine M Kawamura Fri 7:00PM -
9:50PM
Burkle 24 Class meets on Fri (7-10pm) 2/8, 3/8, 4/19, 5/10 Drucker famously said: "Management is neither an art nor a science. It is a practice." The goal of this 2-unit practicum is to help students enhance their own management experiences. Students can select from a menu of options and are encouraged to engage in as much variety as possible. The options include: an introduction to the practice of management, working in an internship or corporate residency, starting a business, undertaking a consulting project, shadowing a C- Suite executive, or serving on a Board.

MGT
380C 3093 1 2 M1 Practice of Management: Creative Practice Lab
TextbookTextbook
Hovig Tchalian Tue 7:00PM -
9:50PM
Pomona, The Hive-Shed This course comprises the final, project-based course in the Practice of Management series. The course is comprised entirely of a single strategic project, carried out for a sponsoring organization that has contracted with the Institute for the Practice of Management.

MGT
383 3094 1 2 M2 Economics of Strategy
TextbookTextbook
Jay Prag Iv Mon 7:00PM -
9:50PM
Burkle 14 This class uses the business-related tenets of economics (old and new) to generate a modern, consistent, formal framework for strategic decision-making. Using economic intuition we will be able to address issues ranging from outsourcing to new product lines. We will be able to explain why some firms actively compete through price changes while others, in apparently similar competitive industries, do not. Economic theories seem very abstract to many students because these theories usually assume many unrealistic things about people and society. Students must be mindful of the fact that these assumptions are what allow economists to answer many otherwise intractable questions. The results that we attain usually hold even without these simplifying assumptions. This class will show how some of these economic models can provide a powerful, formal framework for answering managerial questions ranging from dealing with competition to setting proper incentives for managers.

MGT
400M 3221 1 0   Continuous Registration (MA Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Continuous Registration is the continuation course for a master's level student to complete requirements for the degree.

MGT
499 3223 1 0   Doctoral Study (PhD Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Doctoral Study is the continuation course for a doctoral student to complete their dissertation and other requirements for the degree.

MGT
537A 3125 1 2 M1 The Executive Mind I: The Power of Attention
TextbookTextbook
Jeremy Hunter Mon 7:00PM -
9:50PM
Burkle 24 Self-Management is the missing link in managerial education. We train managers to manage everthing but themselves. However, long-term success and well being depends on cultivating this vital skill. This course offers a systematic approach to the challenge of managing oneself. From it, you will learn methods and tools that can be applied immediately and practiced for a lifetime.

MGT
550 3127 1 4 M1 Strategy
TextbookTextbook
Jonathan Jaffee Fri 7:00PM -
9:50PM
Burkle 14 Class meets on Fri 1/25 7-9:50pm, Sat 1/26 9am-5:20pm, Fri 2/1 7-9:50pm, Sat 2/2 9am-5:20pm, Fri 2/15 7-9:50pm, Sat 2/16 9am-5:20pm, Fri 2/22 7-9:50pm, Sat 2/23 9am-5:20pm Recent work on strategy challenges the notion of sustainable competitive advantage derived from industry analysis, product market portfolio selection, and their resource allocation. Although these concepts, tools, and techniques are useful, their durability and value need to be assessed in a world of intense global competition and instant communication, where competitive advantage may not be sustained for long. Success also depends on outpacing competition, creating new industry boundaries, making new competitive rules, and stretching and leveraging available resources and capabilities.

MGT
552 3128 1 2 M1 The Effective Executive
TextbookTextbook
Vijay Sathe Thu 7:00PM -
9:50PM
Burkle 14 The focus of Peter Drucker’s book The Effective Executive is on "managing oneself for effectiveness." As he put it, “Executives who do not manage themselves for effectiveness cannot possibly expect to manage their associates and subordinates... Effectiveness is what executives are paid for, whether they work as managers who are responsible for the performance of others as well as their own, or as individual contributors for their own performance only." (2006, p. ix). This course builds on Drucker’s seminal work by focusing on how you can become more effective in the workplace by understanding and applying the keys that drive job performance, job satisfaction, happiness at work and personal and professional growth.

MGT
554 3129 1 2 M2 Creating Change
TextbookTextbook
Jeremy Hunter, Vijay Sathe Mon 7:00PM -
9:50PM
Burkle 26 Class meets on Mon 4/1 7-9:50pm, Sat 4/6 9am-4pm, Mon 4/8 7-9:50pm, Mon 4/15 7-9:50pm, Mon 4/22 7-9:50pm, Mon 4/29 7-9:50pm This course will teach you the intellectual and emotional skills needed to create change in your organization and in yourself. These skills include: how to monitor changes taking place external to your organization that will sooner or later require changes in the work that you and the people you are responsible for do; how to prepare them and yourself to deal with these changes proactively by understanding what has to change and why; how to educate and train yourself and your people to think and behave in the new ways necessary for success; and how to garner the resources and support needed to make all this happen.

MGT
617 3429 1 2 E1 Designing Innovative Strategy
TextbookTextbook
Hideki Yamawaki Fri 7:00PM -
9:50PM
Burkle 12 Class meets Fri 2/8 (7-10pm), Sat 2/9 (9am-5:30pm), Fri 3/1 (7-10pm), Sat 3/2 (9am-5:30pm) Many corporations these days move away from analyzing existing opportunities and look to the creation of new options that they have not yet considered. An emerging approach is to see value in the designer’s approach to solving problems. Designing Innovative Strategy combines classroom and design projects to expose students to a new working environment of design driven companies. Students are expected to learn new ways in which to combine creativity, managerial skills and entrepreneurial spirit in holistic ways. In particular, students will have opportunity to work with the designer’s approach – a deep understanding of the user/client, creative solutions to constraints and tensions, prototyping, and continuous modifications. Initial classroom study utilizes class discussion and workshops to focus on business strategy and creativity/innovation languages. The students are assigned to work on a design project in teams.

MGT
800 3182 1 8   Drucker Pathway
TextbookTextbook
Jenny Darroch Wed  -
No Room Needed This capstone course allows participants in the California Police Chiefs Executive Leadership Institute to complete additional coursework toward the executive management program. It covers Drucker readings and professional development assignments. Does not need AV or classroom assignment. Pre-requisite: Successful completion of the California Police Chiefs Executive Leadership Institute.

MUSIC
234 3206 1 2 - 4   Guitar
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Instructor: Jack Sanders This class is taught as an individual lesson. Special arrangements must be made by the student’s academic advisor, the student and the instructor prior to registering for this class. Students must select 4 units, until the minimum total units of lessons required for your degree has been completed. After the minimum has been met, students may select 2 or 4 units. 2 units = 7 hours of individual instruction, 4 units = 14 hours of individual instruction.

MUSIC
236 3207 1 2 - 4   Harpsichord
TextbookTextbook
Robert Zappulla  -
No Room Needed This class is taught as an individual lesson. Special arrangements must be made by the student’s academic advisor, the student and the instructor prior to registering for this class. Students must select 4 units, until the minimum total units of lessons required for your degree has been completed. After the minimum has been met, students may select 2 or 4 units. 2 units = 7 hours of individual instruction, 4 units = 14 hours of individual instruction.

MUSIC
240 3208 1 2 - 4   Organ
TextbookTextbook
Carey Robertson  -
No Room Needed This class is taught as an individual lesson. Special arrangements must be made by the student’s academic advisor, the student and the instructor prior to registering for this class. Students must select 4 units, until the minimum total units of lessons required for your degree has been completed. After the minimum has been met, students may select 2 or 4 units. 2 units = 7 hours of individual instruction, 4 units = 14 hours of individual instruction.

MUSIC
241 3209 1 2 - 4   Piano
TextbookTextbook
Nadia Shpachenko-Gottesman  -
No Room Needed This class is taught as an individual lesson. Special arrangements must be made by the student’s academic advisor, the student and the instructor prior to registering for this class. Students must select 4 units, until the minimum total units of lessons required for your degree has been completed. After the minimum has been met, students may select 2 or 4 units. 2 units = 7 hours of individual instruction, 4 units = 14 hours of individual instruction.

MUSIC
241 3210 2 2 - 4   Piano
TextbookTextbook
Jenny Soonjin Kim  -
No Room Needed This class is taught as an individual lesson. Special arrangements must be made by the student’s academic advisor, the student and the instructor prior to registering for this class. Students must select 4 units, until the minimum total units of lessons required for your degree has been completed. After the minimum has been met, students may select 2 or 4 units. 2 units = 7 hours of individual instruction, 4 units = 14 hours of individual instruction.

MUSIC
241 3211 3 2 - 4   Piano
TextbookTextbook
Gayle Blankenburg  -
No Room Needed This class is taught as an individual lesson. Special arrangements must be made by the student’s academic advisor, the student and the instructor prior to registering for this class. Students must select 4 units, until the minimum total units of lessons required for your degree has been completed. After the minimum has been met, students may select 2 or 4 units. 2 units = 7 hours of individual instruction, 4 units = 14 hours of individual instruction.

MUSIC
241 3502 4 2 - 4   Piano
TextbookTextbook
Grace Fong  -
No Room Needed This class is taught as an individual lesson. Special arrangements must be made by the student’s academic advisor, the student and the instructor prior to registering for this class. Students must select 4 units, until the minimum total units of lessons required for your degree has been completed. After the minimum has been met, students may select 2 or 4 units. 2 units = 7 hours of individual instruction, 4 units = 14 hours of individual instruction.

MUSIC
248 3212 1 2 - 4   Violin
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Instructor: Chan Ho Yun This class is taught as an individual lesson. Special arrangements must be made by the student’s academic advisor, the student and the instructor prior to registering for this class. Students must select 4 units, until the minimum total units of lessons required for your degree has been completed. After the minimum has been met, students may select 2 or 4 units. 2 units = 7 hours of individual instruction, 4 units = 14 hours of individual instruction.

MUSIC
250 3215 1 2 - 4   Voice
TextbookTextbook
Camelia Voin  -
No Room Needed This class is taught as an individual lesson. Special arrangements must be made by the student’s academic advisor, the student and the instructor prior to registering for this class. Students must select 4 units, until the minimum total units of lessons required for your degree has been completed. After the minimum has been met, students may select 2 or 4 units. 2 units = 7 hours of individual instruction, 4 units = 14 hours of individual instruction.

MUSIC
250 3216 2 2 - 4   Voice
TextbookTextbook
Charles Roe  -
No Room Needed This class is taught as an individual lesson. Special arrangements must be made by the student’s academic advisor, the student and the instructor prior to registering for this class. Students must select 4 units, until the minimum total units of lessons required for your degree has been completed. After the minimum has been met, students may select 2 or 4 units. 2 units = 7 hours of individual instruction, 4 units = 14 hours of individual instruction.

MUSIC
251 3219 1 2 - 4   Conducting
TextbookTextbook
David J Rentz  -
No Room Needed This class is taught as an individual lesson. Special arrangements must be made by the student’s academic advisor, the student and the instructor prior to registering for this class. Students must select 4 units, until the minimum total units of lessons required for your degree has been completed. After the minimum has been met, students may select 2 or 4 units. 2 units = 7 hours of individual instruction, 4 units = 14 hours of individual instruction.

MUSIC
259 3222 1 2 - 4   Fortepiano
TextbookTextbook
Jenny Soonjin Kim  -
No Room Needed This class is taught as an individual lesson. Special arrangements must be made by the student’s academic advisor, the student and the instructor prior to registering for this class. Students must select 4 units, until the minimum total units of lessons required for your degree has been completed. After the minimum has been met, students may select 2 or 4 units. 2 units = 7 hours of individual instruction, 4 units = 14 hours of individual instruction.

MUSIC
270 3047 1 1   Keyboard Performance Forum
TextbookTextbook
Jenny Soonjin Kim Fri 10:00AM -
12:50PM
Stauffer 10 This course is essentially a playing/master class open to all students enrolled in keyboard performance programs, as well as other Music students with a high level of keyboard proficiency by permission of the instructor. Students will perform regularly and be critiqued by the instructor and other course members. A strong emphasis will be placed on historical performance practices as outlined in primary sources, thus periodic reading assignments from keyboard performance treatises throughout history will comprise an important part of the course.

MUSIC
271 3227 1 2 - 4   Chamber Music
TextbookTextbook
Lindsey D Strand-Polyak  -
No Room Needed This class is taught as an individual lesson. Special arrangements must be made by the student’s academic advisor, the student and the instructor prior to registering for this class. Students must select 4 units, until the minimum total units of lessons required for your degree has been completed. After the minimum has been met, students may select 2 or 4 units. 2 units = 7 hours of individual instruction, 4 units = 14 hours of individual instruction.

MUSIC
275 3228 1 2 - 4   Baroque Violin
TextbookTextbook
Lindsey D Strand-Polyak  -
No Room Needed This class is taught as an individual lesson. Special arrangements must be made by the student’s academic advisor, the student and the instructor prior to registering for this class. Students must select 4 units, until the minimum total units of lessons required for your degree has been completed. After the minimum has been met, students may select 2 or 4 units. 2 units = 7 hours of individual instruction, 4 units = 14 hours of individual instruction.

MUSIC
293 3230 1 2 - 4   Composition
TextbookTextbook
Edward Zeliff  -
No Room Needed This class is taught as an individual lesson. Special arrangements must be made by the student’s academic advisor, the student and the instructor prior to registering for this class. Students must select 4 units, until the minimum total units of lessons required for your degree has been completed. After the minimum has been met, students may select 2 or 4 units. 2 units = 7 hours of individual instruction, 4 units = 14 hours of individual instruction.

MUSIC
293 3232 2 2 - 4   Composition
TextbookTextbook
Peter Boyer  -
No Room Needed This class is taught as an individual lesson. Special arrangements must be made by the student’s academic advisor, the student and the instructor prior to registering for this class. Students must select 4 units, until the minimum total units of lessons required for your degree has been completed. After the minimum has been met, students may select 2 or 4 units. 2 units = 7 hours of individual instruction, 4 units = 14 hours of individual instruction.

MUSIC
299RP 3424 1 0   Recital Preparation
TextbookTextbook
Jenny Soonjin Kim  -
Stauffer 10 Course fee applies. Meeting dates/times determined individually with instructor. Recital Preparation is available to music students who have completed the required number of individual lesson units for their degree program, but still require further preparation before giving their final degree recital(s). The course consists of 14 individual 1-hour instrument lessons. Instructor permission is required, and day/time of individual lessons should be arranged directly with instructor. Students that have completed all coursework requirements, must also register for Doctoral Studies (DMA/DCM/PhD) or Continuous Registration (MA). Course fee applies, see department for amount.

MUSIC
299RP 3425 2 0   Recital Preparation
TextbookTextbook
Robert Zappulla  -
Stauffer 10 Course fee applies. Meeting dates/times determined individually with instructor. Recital Preparation is available to music students who have completed the required number of individual lesson units for their degree program, but still require further preparation before giving their final degree recital(s). The course consists of 14 individual 1-hour instrument lessons. Instructor permission is required, and day/time of individual lessons should be arranged directly with instructor. Students that have completed all coursework requirements, must also register for Doctoral Studies (DMA/DCM/PhD) or Continuous Registration (MA). Course fee applies, see department for amount.

MUSIC
299RP 3456 4 0   Recital Preparation
TextbookTextbook
Nadia Shpachenko-Gottesman  -
No Room Needed Course fee applies. Meeting dates/times determined individually with instructor. Recital Preparation is available to music students who have completed the required number of individual lesson units for their degree program, but still require further preparation before giving their final degree recital(s). The course consists of 14 individual 1-hour instrument lessons. Instructor permission is required, and day/time of individual lessons should be arranged directly with instructor. Students that have completed all coursework requirements, must also register for Doctoral Studies (DMA/DCM/PhD) or Continuous Registration (MA). Course fee applies, see department for amount.

MUSIC
299RP 3461 5 0   Recital Preparation
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Instructor: Chan Ho Yun. Course fee applies. Meeting dates/times determined individually with instructor. Recital Preparation is available to music students who have completed the required number of individual lesson units for their degree program, but still require further preparation before giving their final degree recital(s). The course consists of 14 individual 1-hour instrument lessons. Instructor permission is required, and day/time of individual lessons should be arranged directly with instructor. Students that have completed all coursework requirements, must also register for Doctoral Studies (DMA/DCM/PhD) or Continuous Registration (MA). Course fee applies, see department for amount.

MUSIC
302 3048 1 4   Music Research Methodology & Bibliography
TextbookTextbook
Holly Gardinier Tue 6:00PM -
8:50PM
TCC, Honnold/Mudd Libr Keck Ro This course introduces the many types of electronic and print bibliographic tools needed to pursue research in music. The course also covers research methods, citation practices, and ways to evaluate research.

MUSIC
316 3049 1 4   American Film Music: Literature and Analysis
TextbookTextbook
Peter Boyer Tue 1:00PM -
3:50PM
Stauffer 10 A study of music for American films from its origins in the "silent" film era, through the so-called "Golden Age" of the 1930s and '40s, and up to the present day. Examination of significant trends in the history of American film scoring and their relationship to developments in American cinema, both technological and cultural. Discussion of the contributions of the most significant American film composers, and analysis of key film scores, with emphasis on the interaction between music and the other cinematic elements. The area of focus in the course is “mainstream” Hollywood narrative films.

MUSIC
321 3050 1 4   The Major Choral Works of J.S. Bach
TextbookTextbook
Robert Zappulla Thu 4:00PM -
6:50PM
Stauffer 10 Discussions and presentations concerning these choral works by Bach.

MUSIC
342 3051 1 2   The Contemporary Working Composer
TextbookTextbook
Peter Boyer Thu 11:30AM -
1:00PM
Stauffer 10 This 2-unit course (meeting for 90 minutes per week) will focus on aspects of the work and career of the contemporary concert music composer. The primary focus will be the professional experiences of Boyer as a highly active orchestral composer for the concert hall, as well as an orchestrator working on the teams of top Hollywood film composers. Class meetings will include detailed discussions of Boyer's many concert works and film orchestrations, as well as discussions of composer career promotion, sources of income, and professional development. Open to music students, whether composers or non-composers.

MUSIC
400M 3274 1 0   Continuous Registration (MA Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Continuous Registration is the continuation course for a master's level student to complete requirements for the degree.

MUSIC
402 3052 1 4   Renaissance Music
TextbookTextbook
Robert Zappulla Mon 4:00PM -
6:50PM
Stauffer 10 The ability to analyze music literature and discuss music in all its aspects results in better performers, scholars, and teachers. This course will provide the basis for developing the skills required to analyze and discuss Renaissance music, with emphases placed on historical, stylistic, and analytical matters, as well as on performance practices pertaining to the compositions under consideration. Such skills are tested in the Department of Music's qualifying examinations for the graduate degrees it offers and are necessary to complete satisfactorily theses, dissertations, and project papers. Students will have regular reading and analytical/research assignments as well as the opportunity to present their work in both written and oral form.

MUSIC
499 3279 1 0   Doctoral Study (PhD Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Doctoral Study is the continuation course for a doctoral student to complete their dissertation and other requirements for the degree.

PHIL
499 3281 1 0   Doctoral Study (PhD Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Doctoral Study is the continuation course for a doctoral student to complete their dissertation and other requirements for the degree.

PP
307 3300 1 4   The Modern Presidency
TextbookTextbook
Michael Uhlmann Tue 1:00PM -
3:50PM
McManus 31 The primary purpose of this course is to provide an overview and a framework for understanding the role the President occupies in contemporary American politics. The office of President is unique, in that no other political office in the world combines as few formal powers with such high public expectations. Throughout the semester we will consider a broad range of intellectual approaches and methodologies which have been used to study the presidency. Although we will read some historical and legal scholars, the course will primarily emphasize different political science approaches to presidential research.

PP
309 3305 1 4   Women, Politics, and Policy
TextbookTextbook
Jean Reith Schroedel Wed 1:00PM -
3:50PM
McManus 35 This course provides an overview and a framework for understanding the many ways that women interact with the political system. We will study the reasons for using gender as an analytic category, women's participation in the political process, and the ways that governmental policies affect the lives of women. Topics include equal rights, the welfare system, reproductive rights, and the criminal justice system.

PP
315 3351 1 4   Seminar in Deliberative Democracy
TextbookTextbook
Joseph Bessette Thu 4:00PM -
6:50PM
McManus 31 This course examines the functioning of the governing institutions in the United States (particularly Congress, the presidency, and the federal courts) in light of the broad purpose they serve in promoting the rule of what James Madison called "the cool and deliberate sense of community."

PP
316 3308 1 4   State & Local Institutions
TextbookTextbook
Christopher Krewson Wed 7:00PM -
9:50PM
McManus 31 This course will teach students about institutions, political behavior, and policy process at the state and local levels. This will not be a purely descriptive exercise. Rather, using the tools of political science, students will explore the causes and consequences of institutional variation at the sub-national levels. Participants will become conversant in the primary debates in the field while also being exposed to cutting-edge and innovative work. The course places a special emphasis on state and local institutions in California due to the state’s national importance, its ethnic and cultural diversity, and the fact that what happens in California has a direct impact on CGU and its students.

PP
331 3307 1 4   Policy Evaluation: Research Design to Solve Real-world Problems
TextbookTextbook
Javier Rodriguez Wed 4:00PM -
6:50PM
Harper 65 This course will address alternative models for understanding and evaluating public policy, ranging from those based on traditional welfare economics to others based on political philosophy. Case applications for each of the major models will be discussed. Research design tailored to the appropriate conceptual approach and the practical requirements of the research setting will be explored. Each student should develop a working knowledge of how to consider, design, and manage applied research studies in a range of policy areas.

PP
338 3352 1 4   Policy Design & Implementation
TextbookTextbook
Robert Klitgaard Thu 7:00PM -
9:50PM
Academic Computing 119 This graduate seminar explores classic topics in policy analysis and evaluation, such as market and non-market failures, estimating the effects of policy changes, and implementation. It also explores newer themes such as disadvantage and stigma, public-private-nonprofit partnerships, and processes to engage citizens and policymakers.

PP
400M 3373 1 0   Continuous Registration (MA Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Continuous Registration is the continuation course for a master's level student to complete requirements for the degree.

PP
458 3309 1 4   Machiavelli's Discourses on Livy
TextbookTextbook
James Nichols Thu 1:00PM -
3:50PM
Harper 65 This course is devoted to the interpretation and critical understanding of Machiavelli's Discourses on Livy. Whereas the shorter Prince is more widely read, the much larger and more difficult Discourses is Machiavelli's far more detailed analysis of political life and institutions, with a particular emphasis on republics. It is arguably the first source of distinctively modern thinking about republican governance. Along with the Discourses, we will read the relevant books of Livy's History of Rome; frequently refer to parallel or contrasting arguments in Machiavelli's Prince; discuss earlier authors such as Aristotle, Polybius, and Cicero; and take note of subsequent thinkers who took an interest in Machiavelli's political thought, such as Locke, Montesquieu, and Rousseau.

PP
482 3301 1 4   Advanced Quantitative Research Methods
TextbookTextbook
Javier Rodriguez Tue 4:00PM -
6:50PM
Academic Computing 126 This is a course in regression analysis. Our attention will be focused partly on theoretical issues and partly on practical problems in applied regression. The dual aims of the course are to develop students' good taste as consumers of published quantitative research and to prepare them for more advanced study of econometric techniques.

PP
483 3299 1 4   Legal Research Methods
TextbookTextbook
Christopher Krewson Mon 4:00PM -
6:50PM
Academic Computing 119 This course teaches students how to find and analyze the law, and introduces them to computerized methods of legal research. Topics are presented weekly and assignments require research in legal libraries. The assignments are intended to develop clear analytical and legal writing.

PP
499 3372 1 0   Doctoral Study (PhD Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Doctoral Study is the continuation course for a doctoral student to complete their dissertation and other requirements for the degree.

PSYCH
306A 3365 1 2   Directed Res: Evaluation
TextbookTextbook
Tarek Azzam Wed 9:00AM -
11:50AM
Burkle 22 Class meets on Wednesday 1/23, 2/6, 2/20, 3/6, 3/20, 4/3, 4/17, 5/1 and 5/15. All psychology students, during their first two semesters at CGU, will enroll for Directed Research (two units per semester). These units represent a ten hour per week commitment to developing and executing a research project with a faculty supervisor who is conducting an ongoing program of research. All students should enroll in one of the 306 seminars although they may arrange with the 306 instructor to work on a research project with another faculty member.

PSYCH
306B 3027 1 2   Directed Research: Social
TextbookTextbook
Michael Hogg Tue 1:00PM -
3:50PM
Academic Computing 208 All psychology students, during their first two semesters at CGU, will enroll for Directed Research (two units per semester). These units represent a ten hour per week commitment to developing and executing a research project with a faculty supervisor who is conducting an ongoing program of research. All students should enroll in one of the 306 seminars although they may arrange with the 306 instructor to work on a research project with another faculty member.

PSYCH
306C 3342 1 2   Directed Research: Cognitive
TextbookTextbook
Kathy Pezdek Fri 9:00AM -
11:50AM
Academic Computing 119 Class meets Friday 9am-12pm 2/1, 2/22, 3/8, 4/5, 4/19, 5/3 All psychology students, during their first two semesters at CGU, will enroll for Directed Research (two units per semester). These units represent a ten hour per week commitment to developing and executing a research project with a faculty supervisor who is conducting an ongoing program of research. All students should enroll in one of the 306 seminars although they may arrange with the 306 instructor to work on a research project with another faculty member.

PSYCH
306D 3366 1 2   Directed Research: Developmental
TextbookTextbook
Kendall Bronk Wed 9:00AM -
11:50AM
Quality of Life Research Ctr Class meets on Wednesday 1/23, 2/6, 2/20, 3/6, 3/27, 4/8, 4/22 and 5/1 All psychology students, during their first two semesters at CGU, will enroll for Directed Research (two units per semester). These units represent a ten hour per week commitment to developing and executing a research project with a faculty supervisor who is conducting an ongoing program of research. All students should enroll in one of the 306 seminars although they may arrange with the 306 instructor to work on a research project with another faculty member.

PSYCH
306F 3136 1 2   Directed Research: Organizational Behavior
TextbookTextbook
Rebecca Reichard Thu 4:00PM -
6:50PM
Burkle 24 This course will meet biweekly All psychology students, during their first two semesters at CGU, will enroll for Directed Research (two units per semester). These units represent a ten hour per week commitment to developing and executing a research project with a faculty supervisor who is conducting an ongoing program of research. All students should enroll in one of the 306 seminars although they may arrange with the 306 instructor to work on a research project with another faculty member.

PSYCH
306H 3348 1 2   Advanced Evaluation Science Practicum
TextbookTextbook
Stewart Donaldson, Christina Christie  -
No Room Needed Online class. This course does not follow the regular academic calendar and the days/times of the calls will be determined later. See department for details. This advanced 2 unit course is designed for students who are currently involved in an evaluation project, as part of their professional work. The purpose of the course is to apply evaluation theory and research literature to specific evaluation questions, methods, or issues; emphasize learning from participants’ experiences across projects; provide additional support to students (from faculty and other students) who are using project data for position papers, evaluation proposals, the implementation of an evaluation, or evaluation training.

PSYCH
308C 3024 1 2 M1 Applied Multiple Regression
TextbookTextbook
Andrew Conway TueThu 9:00AM -
11:50AM
Burkle 16 This module covers bivariate and multivariate correlation and regression with an emphasis on applications of multiple regression to data analysis.

PSYCH
308D 3025 1 2 M2 Categorical Data Analysis
TextbookTextbook
Andrew Conway TueThu 9:00AM -
11:50AM
Burkle 16 The purpose of this course is to introduce students to Categorical Data Analysis. This is a broad topic and includes various types of procedures. We will cover chi-square tests, binary logistic regression, discriminant function analysis, and moderation and mediation. We will also discuss resampling methods such as bootstrapping as well as non-parametric statistical tests. This course is required of all first-year students in the M.A. and the Ph.D. programs in DBOS. All examples are presented using both SPSS and R software.

PSYCH
311B 3341 1 0 - 2   Effective Professional Communication
TextbookTextbook
Kathy Pezdek Fri 9:00AM -
11:50AM
Academic Computing 119 Class meets 9am-12pm Friday 1/25, 2/8, 3/1, 3/15, 4/12, 4/26, 5/10 In this course, students will have experience presenting their research in many different formats to many different audiences. These include, a conference presentation, "elevator talk", a job talk, an executive summary, and papers of varying lengths. This course is appropriate for students at all levels in the program, as long as they have a research project well underway.

PSYCH
315A 3030 1 2 M2 Theory-Driven Program Evaluation
TextbookTextbook
Stewart Donaldson Tue 1:00PM -
3:50PM
Burkle 24 This module is designed to provide students with an in-depth understanding of theory-driven program evaluation. Special emphasis will be placed on teaching participants how to engage diverse stakeholders in the process of developing program theories, and how to design comprehensive, tailored, theory-driven evaluations.

PSYCH
315CC 3319 1 4   Study of Experience
TextbookTextbook
Jeanne Nakamura Fri 9:00AM -
11:50AM
Burkle 22 This course introduces methods used in the systematic study of experience, a topic that William James, the father of American psychology, viewed as the central issue of the discipline. Students will become familiar with the use of experience sampling methods to capture phenomenological states (motivations, emotions, cognitions) as they occur in everyday life contexts and with uses of the resulting data for educational, organizational, and basic research purposes. During the course, students will conduct research using state-of-the-art methods. There are no formal prerequisites for this course but prior completion of the PSYCH 308 statistics series is assumed and concurrent enrollment in multilevel modeling (PSYCH 315e) is encouraged.

PSYCH
315J 3296 1 2 M2 Survey Research Methods
TextbookTextbook
Jason Siegel Tue 9:00AM -
11:50AM
Burkle 14 This is a practically oriented course on methods of survey research that covers the planning and administration of survey questionnaires, sampling, the construction of questionnaires and interviews, principles of field work and coding, and the analysis of questionnaire data. During the module, class members will carry out a joint survey research project, making use of their learning about all phases of survey research.

PSYCH
315Z 3002 1 4   Comparative Evaluation Theory
TextbookTextbook
Leslie Fierro Mon 9:00AM -
11:50AM
Academic Computing 214 This course will provide students with a basic understanding of: prevalent evaluation theories, systems for categorizing these theories, the process of theory development in evaluation, connections between evaluation theory and practice, research on evaluation, and some professional issues in evaluation.

PSYCH
315Z 3020 2 4   Comparative Evaluation Theory
TextbookTextbook
Leslie Fierro Wed 9:00AM -
11:50AM
Academic Computing 214 This course will provide students with a basic understanding of: prevalent evaluation theories, systems for categorizing these theories, the process of theory development in evaluation, connections between evaluation theory and practice, research on evaluation, and some professional issues in evaluation.

PSYCH
316A 3347 1 2   Advanced Seminar in Evaluation Methods
TextbookTextbook
Rebecca Eddy, Tarek Azzam  -
No Room Needed Online class. This course does not follow the regular academic calendar and the days/times of the calls will be determined later. See department for details. In this course, we will examine various evaluation designs, data collection methods, data analysis techniques and strategies for communicating and reporting evaluation processes and findings. By the end of the course, students will understand various evaluation design options and under what conditions they should be used; understand the strengths and weaknesses of various data collection methods; understand how to approach the analysis of both quantitative and qualitative data; understand the wide range of ways to communicate and report evaluation processes and findings.

PSYCH
317A 3346 1 4   Advanced Seminar in Evaluation Theory, Practice & Research
TextbookTextbook
Stewart Donaldson, Christina Christie  -
No Room Needed Online class. This course does not follow the regular academic calendar and the days/times of the calls will be determined later. See department for details. This seminar will provide students with an advanced understanding of the discipline and profession of evaluation. Students will engage in intensive study of "cutting edge" evaluation topics and core concepts in three areas: evaluation theory, practice, and research. There are several course objectives: Understand the history, influences, and evolution of evaluation across the globe. Understand and identify the conceptual distinctions between contemporary theories of evaluation practice. Become familiar with systems for categorizing evaluation theories. Become familiar with the standards for the ethical conduct of evaluation. Become familiar with classic, current, and new directions for research on evaluation.

PSYCH
319E 3086 1 4   Doctoral Seminar in Positive Organizational Development
TextbookTextbook
Stewart Donaldson Wed 1:00PM -
3:50PM
McManus 33 This course is designed to provide students with an in-depth understanding of organizational development and change from a traditional and positive perspective. Recommending, planning, managing, surviving, and evaluating change are challenges that concern all types of organizations. The ability of organizations to gain and maintain a competitive advantage in today’s rapidly changing environmental context, given the evolving needs of the workforce, relies on the capability to adapt. The objective of this seminar will be to help you understand the latest theories, research, intervention design strategies, and evaluation approaches critical for leading planned change efforts in modern business, not-for profit, health care, and community-based organizations.

PSYCH
323 3135 1 4   Group Processes & Intergroup Relations
TextbookTextbook
Michael Hogg Thu 1:00PM -
3:50PM
Academic Computing 208 This advanced level core course in the social psychology program examines a broad range of topics in the social psychology of processes and phenomena that occur within and between social groups and categories. It focuses on both theory and empirical research and may include topics such as self and social identity, social exclusion, conformity and influence, group motivation and social dilemmas, group structure and decision making, protest and social change, conflict and cooperation between groups, and discrimination and prejudice. It pays to enroll early as a quota of 20 to 25 students may be imposed.

PSYCH
327 3019 1 4   Applying Principles of Social and Behavioral Change
TextbookTextbook
Eusebio Alvaro MonWed 1:00PM -
3:50PM
Academic Computing 208 This class will meet two times a week - Monday and Wednesday from 1-3:50pm every other week. This applied persuasion course will review social psychology theory and research in attitude and behavior change with the goal of informing attempts to influence changes in socially important contexts such as health and social justice. Students will become aware of persuasion theory and research in across a multitude of areas including: attitude formation and change, attitude-behavior congruity, cognitive and affective bases of attitudes and behavior, source and receiver issues impacting effective persuasion, etc. Moreover, they will learn how to apply this content to actual health and socially important contexts. Throughout the course, examples of applied persuasion will be drawn from past and ongoing real-world interventions and media campaigns.

PSYCH
329 3322 1 4   Foundations of Positive Psychology
TextbookTextbook
Jeanne Nakamura Wed 1:00PM -
3:50PM
Academic Computing 214 A general introduction to the history and intellectual sources of this new field. It will acquaint students with the main topics of research and application. These will include the phenomenology of positive experience, virtues and strengths, and institutional supports for positive development through the life course – e.g., families, schools, work environments, community involvement.

PSYCH
332 3026 1 4   Adolescent Development
TextbookTextbook
Kendall Bronk Tue 9:00AM -
11:50AM
Burkle 24 Designed to acquaint students with the major research and theories on adolescence, this course will explore the nature of adolescent development in terms of biological, cognitive, social, and emotional processes. With an emphasis on theory, students will learn to differentiate between myth and fact regarding adolescent development by critically examining research findings across disciplines. The course will begin with a general overview of the most influential theories of adolescent development. Next, attention will be focused on critically examining empirical findings supposedly supportive of the most renowned theories. Students will then be given the opportunity to explore theories from across disciplines with the goal of discovering new explanations of adolescent thought and behavior. At the end of the course, students will present and defend a theoretical rationale explaining behavior and thought indicative of adolescence.

PSYCH
350D 3134 1 4   Law & Psychology
TextbookTextbook
Kathy Pezdek Thu 1:00PM -
3:50PM
Academic Computing 119 In this seminar we will explore the scientific knowledge that psychologists bring to the courtroom when they testify about topics relevant to clinical, social, cognitive and developmental psychology. The legal standards that govern the admissibility of psychology expert testimony and define the adjudication of these issues will also be critically examined. Additionally, the policy implications of modifying the governing legal standards and the scope of psychological research will be discussed. Student research projects will be a central component of the course.

PSYCH
350EE 3369 1 4   Designing High Performance Organizations Using Neuroscience
TextbookTextbook
Paul Zak Mon 1:00PM -
3:50PM
Academic Computing 119 Leaders of organizations face a difficult problem: how to motivate a group of diverse individuals to achieve a common purpose. This course draws on recent developments in neuroeconomics and management, many of which resonate with the writings of Peter Drucker, to help students identify a new set of leverage points that both raise organizational performance and increase employee engagement and satisfaction. The course is case-based so students learn how to put principles into practice. Students will also develop and present their own analyses of their own or other organizations that have put these approaches into practice

PSYCH
350H 3088 1 4   Organizational Culture
TextbookTextbook
Michelle Bligh Wed 4:00PM -
6:50PM
Academic Computing 214 This course provides an overview of the methodological, epistemological, and problem-solving issues involved in the study of organizational culture. The course will examine the wide range of approaches to the study of organizational culture, the underlying assumptions of these competing approaches, and how these assumptions shape how culture is defined, developed, and changed. We will look at cultural artifacts such as language, metaphors, rites and ceremonies, stories and myths, symbols, dress, history, ways of doing things, buildings and heroes. Methodological approaches, including ethnographic and clinical perspectives, will be compared and contrasted. The course will also examine the role of leaders in shaping organizational culture, and special issues such as mergers and acquisitions, succession, and cultural deviance.

PSYCH
350KK 3029 1 4   Positive Organizational Psychology
TextbookTextbook
Jeffrey Kong Loong Yip Mon 1:00PM -
3:50PM
Academic Computing 108 Positive Organizational Psychology is the study of positive outcomes, processes, and attributes of organizations and their members. As the capstone of the Master’s program in Positive Organizational Psychology, this course will cover classic and contemporary perspectives in positive organizational psychology. In addition, emphasis will be given to organizational application and evidence-based interventions for improving employee well-being, learning, and performance. The course requires active participation and will culminate in an applied project designed by class members.

PSYCH
350PP 3133 1 2 M1 Positive Leadership
TextbookTextbook
Rebecca Reichard Thu 1:00PM -
3:50PM
Stauffer 106 In this course, students will explore the topic of leadership through a positive psychological lens. Recent advances in theoretical and empirical research related to new-genre leadership theories including authentic leadership, strengths-based leadership, shared leadership, followership, and values-based leadership will be discussed.

PSYCH
350XX 3384 1 4   Positive Relationships Across the Lifespan
TextbookTextbook
Saeideh Heshmati Wed 9:00AM -
11:50AM
Academic Computing 208 This course is intended as a selective review of psychological theory and empirical research on positive relationships across the lifespan. Through a variety of readings, the processes and dynamics of interpersonal relationships for each of the developmental life stages will be explored. For example, we will explore parent-child relationships in childhood, teacher-student and peer relationships during adolescence, romantic partner relationships, and work relationships in adulthood. In particular, the focus will be on examining interpersonal relationships as a mechanism for fostering positive development, although other types of relationships will be examined as well. The readings encompass a variety of methodological approaches to studying interpersonal processes. As a final project, students will develop an empirical research proposal on any topic of the students’ choosing related to positive relationships within a developmental framework.

PSYCH
352I 3084 1 4   Evaluating Developmental Interventions
TextbookTextbook
Tiffany Berry Wed 1:00PM -
3:50PM
Academic Computing 108 The main objective for this course is to discuss how developmental psychology and program evaluation work together to inform effective intervention programs serving children and families. The first half of the course will explore the development, implementation, and evaluation of childhood intervention programs within the context of a developmental framework. Key developmental issues will be identified and discussed within each of these three stages of intervention programs. The latter half of the course will be organized around in-depth case studies of intervention programs that target different age ranges (i.e., early childhood, school age, and adolescence). Along with discussing the policy implications for each case study examined, students will have the opportunity to review the empirical literature related to the intervention as well as critique the existing program theory, implementation, and program evaluation. Grades for this course will be based on three components: a term paper, two short (4-5 pgs) paper assignments, and an oral presentation.

PSYCH
352R 3028 1 4   Training & Development
TextbookTextbook
Rebecca Reichard Tue 1:00PM -
3:50PM
Burkle 22 Corporations in the United States spend more money annually on training than do all the public school systems in the country. As the gap widens between the knowledge, skills, and abilities of what entry level employees are required to know and do and what they actually know and do, training specialists and consultants become increasingly more valuable. The purpose of this course is to give you an introduction to the theories, principles, models, and practices related to designing, conducting, and evaluating training programs in organizational settings. In this course we will explore the challenges of training, examine the systematic approach organizational psychologists use to develop quality training programs (from needs assessment through evaluation), and examine the application of learning and motivation theories to training.

PSYCH
354H 3370 1 4   Motivation, Affect & Cognition
TextbookTextbook
Jason Siegel Wed 4:00PM -
6:50PM
Academic Computing 108 This 4-unit class will explore classic and contemporary research on motivational systems and processes (e.g., arousal, needs, expectations), Further, the class will cover the bi-directional influence of affect and cognition on motivation, as well as the role goals play in the motivational system. The class will begin with an exploration of the theoretical frameworks that represent the foundation of the motivation literature, including how these frameworks have developed, the empirical support they have received, and the current status of the foundational frameworks. From there, each week will explore a different topic of motivational scholarship (e.g., frustration, motivation and affect, motivation and cognition). The semester will conclude with a consideration of current motivation research and future directions for the field. Students will be expected to present on several theories throughout the semester, which will include the current status and perceived utility of the framework. Final projects will involve mapping the history of a motivational theory, reporting on its current status, and proposing a study that will push the literature in that domain forward.

PSYCH
354J 3344 1 2 M2 Evaluation Capacity Building
TextbookTextbook
Leslie Fierro Fri 9:00AM -
11:50AM
Burkle 24 Evaluation capacity building (ECB) is a phenomenon that has gained attention in the discipline of evaluation over the past decade as the field has struggled to meet the high demand for evaluation services. Although many definitions for ECB currently exist, the following is the most often recognized, “…the intentional work to continuously create and sustain overall organizational processes that make quality evaluation and its uses routine” (Stockdill et al., 2002, p. 14). In this course we will explore the existing definitions and frameworks of ECB, review several approaches for building evaluation capacity within organizations, connect ECB approaches and frameworks to other literature bases (e.g., organizational behavior, development, and learning; adult learning and development; positive psychology), and examine existing empirical work in this area. Students will work together to reflect critically on the current state of ECB and develop informed suggestions for how to enhance/improve this growing field.

PSYCH
354O 3413 1 2 M1 Current Issues in Evaluation and Applied Research Methodology
TextbookTextbook
Leslie Fierro Fri 9:00AM -
11:50AM
Harper 1 It seems that every day a new applied research methodology or innovative evaluation approach emerges. Although we often have an interest in such new and emerging issues, we sometimes just do not have the time available to explore, discuss, and consider the implications of such issues in our field. In this seminar course we intentionally carve out this time. Students will work with the professor to identify a finite set of new and innovative topics in the area of evaluation and applied research methodology to explore during this 8-week seminar course. Students will then identify relevant articles to share with peers and co-facilitate discussions with the instructor on the selected topic. This is the perfect course for students who are interested in applying innovative approaches/methods as they enter the professional workplace or who are embarking on the process of uncovering their thesis or doctoral dissertation topic.

PSYCH
400C 3101 1 0   Continuous Certificate Registration
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Continuous registration for Certificate of Advanced Study in Evaluation students.

PSYCH
400M 3099 1 0   Continuous Registration (MA Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Continuous Registration is the continuation course for a master's level student to complete requirements for the degree.

PSYCH
413 3343 1 2   Social Identity Research Practicum
TextbookTextbook
Michael Hogg Fri 9:00AM -
11:50AM
Academic Computing 208 Class meets Friday 1/25, 2/22, 3/8, 3/15, 4/5, 4/12, 4/19, 5/3 This social psychology course focuses on social identity theory, broadly defined. It examines its cognitive, motivational and social interactive dimensions, and studies a wide array of social identity and social identity-related processes and phenomena within and between small groups and large social categories. Students will engage with conceptual issues to advance theory, and will be involved in designing, operationalizing and conducting empirical research, and writing-up research for publication and conference presentation. The course is intended for social PhDs but also open to social MA and other psychology PhDs. Students wishing to enroll should obtain permission from Professor Hogg.

PSYCH
414 3131 1 2   Evaluation Procedures Practicum
TextbookTextbook
Tiffany Berry Thu 9:00AM -
11:50AM
Burkle 24 This class meets biweekly Evaluation Practicum is designed to help students implement the evaluation proposals they in Evaluation Procedures. This course is intended to be an applied class that extends students' learning from the classroom into actual organizations. Using the evaluation proposal from Evaluation Procedures, this course will facilitate students' implementation of their evaluation proposals. We will focus on measures/methods, how to collect data within an organizational context efficiently and accurately, analyzing data for an applied audience, and writing a user-friendly report that sufficiently answers stakeholders' key evaluation questions.

PSYCH
415 3345 1 0 - 2   Research Practicum on Applied Memory
TextbookTextbook
Kathy Pezdek Fri 12:00PM -
4:50PM
Academic Computing 119 Class meets 12pm-5pm each Friday. The purpose of this practicum is to introduce students to basic and applied research on working memory. Working memory allows for the temporary maintenance of information in the service of complex cognition. Individual differences in working memory capacity predict a wide range of important cognitive outcomes, such as general intelligence and academic achievement. In this practicum students will learn about contemporary theoretical and computation models of working memory and discuss more applied research that examines the role of working memory in various real-world settings. There are no formal pre-requisites but a background in cognitive psychology is preferred.

PSYCH
450 3349 1 0 - 4   Field Placement
TextbookTextbook
Stewart Donaldson Thu 7:00PM -
9:50PM
Claremont Evaluation Ctr Conf The course will meet on 1/31, 2/21, 3/28 and 4/25. Class meets at Claremont Evaluation Center (175 E. 12th Street, Claremont, CA.) A field placement is a working internship in an organization relevant to students' professional training in psychology. A field placement is usually arranged with the help of each student's faculty advisor as well as with aid from the Research Institute in the department. Four semester units is the minimum for which a student should enroll (425 and 450 combined). If appropriate, the placement may be for a greater number of units and may extend beyond one semester. Simultaneous participation in Psychology 425 (Field Placement Seminar) is required. All students are required to take this course OR Psychology 310 (Supervised Teaching Seminar) during their first three years of enrollment.

PSYCH
499 3097 1 0   Doctoral Study (PhD Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Doctoral Study is the continuation course for a doctoral student to complete their dissertation and other requirements for the degree.

RELCSTH
437TWR 3414 1 4   Future of Religions: the Baha'i Faith
TextbookTextbook
Roland Faber Thu 8:30AM -
11:20AM
CST, Craig-110 Claremont School of Theology Course. Instructor consent and CGU Registration Form-Claremont Colleges Courses required, located at https://mycampus.cgu.edu/web/registrar/forms . The Baha'i Faith is in its own understanding the newest of the world's universal religions. Although still nascent, but with a wide distribution throughout continents, countries, ethnicities, cultural and religious backgrounds only second to Christianity, it offers unique resources for social, cultural and interreligious discourses on pressing global issues today and a renewal of life to which only mystical and spiritual wisdoms can contribute. This course will explore the becoming, origins and developments of the Baha'i Faith, its persistent and still ongoing struggles with persecution, its structures and essential elements of spiritual life, its founders, its revelation, vast sacred text and thought as well as its worldwide reception. In introducing to a faith tradition of non-violence and universal peace, interreligious integrity and spiritual renewal, this course offers the unique opportunity to witness religion in the making today.

RELCSTH
461TTH 3422 1 4   Trinity Revisited: Models, Alterations, Alternatives
TextbookTextbook
Roland Faber Wed 1:00PM -
3:50PM
CST, Craig-110 Claremont School of Theology Course. Instructor consent and CGU Registration Form-Claremont Colleges Courses required, located at https://mycampus.cgu.edu/web/registrar/forms . This seminar will draw on the development of the doctrine of the Trinity, relate the diversity of models, explore the alternations and alternatives to it within and outside of established Christian doctrine, and recover the multireligious presence of trinitarian thought patterns, as well as arguments and counter-arguments as to their relevance. It is the aim of such a transreligious approach to loosen the grip of a possession model of religious doctrines and transform it into a model of transreligious mutuality in the interest of a common and peaceful future of religions.

RELCSTH
496TIR 3421 1 4   Transreligious Discourse: Buddhism and Christianity
TextbookTextbook
Roland Faber Wed 8:30AM -
11:20AM
CST, Craig-111 Claremont School of Theology Course. Instructor consent and CGU Registration Form-Claremont Colleges Courses required, located at https://mycampus.cgu.edu/web/registrar/forms . "Transreligious Discourse" is a new approach to interreligious studies that is interested in processes of transformation between religions with regard to their ways of life, doctrines and rituals. Theoretically, it studies the possibility of such a transfer, not by comparison but by following the trajectories of mutual influences and traces of one religion (way of life, doctrine, or ritual) in the other or by examining their reflection in diverse theologies, Practically it studies matters and ways of transfer. In this seminar, the perspective is upon Buddhism and Christianity, highlighting the mutual reception of various doctrines, which are considered central and irreplaceable in one religion or the other, and the creative transformation they issue in the other religion. Questions will involve: How are transreligious processes possible and how are they happening? what are the theological presuppositions, implications, and consequences when a tradition not only practically allows for such transfers but also reflects on them as part of its own development? Is there a Buddhist Christology? Is there a Christian doctrine of Emptiness? How do the diverse traditions dare to adopt mutually challenging notions of God and Nothingness? Is there a mutual concept of a "Buddha-Christ"?

RELIGION
311 3109 1 4   Women and Witchcraft
TextbookTextbook
Nicola Denzey Wed 4:00PM -
6:50PM
McManus 33 Women and Witchcraft: Why have these two been so consistently associated over the centuries? We’ll examine Latin literature featuring witches including Apuleius’ satirical novel The Golden Ass, Graeco-Roman and Graeco-Egyptian magic spells and magic handbooks, the inquisitorial handbook Malleus Maleficarum (“the “Witches’ Hammer”) designed as a guide to interrogating women suspected of witchcraft, Arthur Miller’s The Crucible, even selections from the Harry Potter series – and read these in conjunction with studies from historical, anthropological, and sociological perspectives. Course may be of interest to AWS/WGS students.

RELIGION
323 3381 1 4   The Origins and Influences of the Zoroastrian Tradition
TextbookTextbook
Jennifer A Rose TueThu 9:35AM -
10:50AM
No Room Needed This course is held on Pomona campus, please view 5C course schedule for room location. This course examines the background and beginnings of the Zoroastrian religion, then explores its role in the three great Iranian Empires – Ancient Persian, Parthian and Sasanian – and considers its relationship with other developing religions, including Judaism, Buddhism, Manichaeism, Christianity and Islam. The course concludes with a focus on the forms and function of Zoroastrianism in Iran, India, and diaspora up to the present day, and its impact upon some of the great European literati, including Voltaire, Mozart and Nietzsche.

RELIGION
365 3112 1 4   The Book of Mormon
TextbookTextbook
Patrick Q Mason, Caroline E Kline Thu 1:00PM -
3:50PM
IAC Library With over 150 million copies printed since it first appeared in 1830, and with the runaway success of the eponymous Broadway musical, the Book of Mormon is arguably the most successful book of scripture to have its origins in the modern West. Yet until quite recently the book has been largely ignored or dismissed by scholars. Designed for students with any level of previous familiarity with the book (ranging from considerable to none), this course will introduce students to the Book of Mormon's origins, content, reception history, and influence. In so doing, we will consider a number of broader themes, including the possibilities and limits of religious studies methodologies; the influence of historical context and reading practices on the formation and maintenance of a scriptural community; the global export of American religious, cultural, and national ideologies; epistemological certainty and uncertainty; and scripture as literature (or literature as scripture). This interdisciplinary course is open to all students, and will be of particular value to those interested in comparative scripture, American religion, American literature, American history, and Mormon studies.

RELIGION
366 3113 1 4   Migration and Religion in America: E Pluribus Unum
TextbookTextbook
Daniel Ramirez Wed 4:00PM -
6:50PM
Burkle 24 Samuel P. Huntington’s premonition about the “clash of civilizations” (between Islam and the West) earned him plaudits as a prescient herald, especially after the events of 9/11. Less known is his concern over the precarious condition of the Anglo Protestant “core” of U.S. culture, a lodestar clouded by the demographic assault of non-Protestant immigration—chiefly Mexican and Catholic. The cool jeremiads, issued from the ivy citadel founded by Puritans, echoed the warning preached by Massachusetts Bay Colony governor John Winthrop aboard the ship Arabella in 1630. The image of a “City upon a Hill” continues to represent, for some, a chartering covenant from which we stray at our peril; hence, the need to always forge a unum (one) out of the pluribus (many). Although that unum was stretched by Will Herberg at mid-twentieth century (to include “Protestant, Catholic, Jew”), our politics continue to reflect a perennial disagreement over American religious cultural identity. The stakes remain high, especially against the backdrop of intensified non-European immigration in the late twentieth century. This is not a strictly American problem. Europe, the other metropole of late modernity, is also wrestling with the challenge of seemingly unassimilable religious and ethnic minorities in ostensibly secular polities borne of the Enlightenment. The chickens of globalization have come home to roost precariously in the global North. Yet, other scholars argue that religion and human movement strengthen and bind as much as they weaken and fragment society; Bible scholars and theologians have illumined the bright thread of migration throughout Jewish and Christian scriptures. In other words, religion and migration impact each other today as much as they have in prior human epochs.

RELIGION
384 3114 1 4   Royal Women in the Hebrew Bible
TextbookTextbook
Tammi Schneider Wed 9:00AM -
11:50AM
IAC Library This course will examine the female characters throughout the Hebrew Bible who are considered "royal." The course will highlight the text in Hebrew, with those reading the text in other languages learning how to assess a translated text and the issues surrounding translation as an interpretative reality. Since the focal characters of this course range over different biblical books so this course will include a detailed reading of each character while also paying careful attention to the differences between books, their storylines, presentation, and theologies to better understand both the role of women in those specific books but within the Hebrew Bible in general.

RELIGION
400M 3275 1 0   Continuous Registration (MA Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Continuous Registration is the continuation course for a master's level student to complete requirements for the degree.

RELIGION
401 3115 1 4   Classical Theories and History of Religious Studies
TextbookTextbook
Daniel Ramirez Mon 4:00PM -
6:50PM
Burkle 24 This course will train students in the key themes, figures, and theories in the historical emergence and practice of the field of religious studies until ca. 1970. Course is required for all Religion PhD students. MA students are welcome.

RELIGION
423 3478 1 4   Readings in 19th Century Philosophy of Religion and Theology
TextbookTextbook
Anselm Min Wed 7:00PM -
9:50PM
IAC Library This course deals with the reading list for one of the Philosophy of Religion and Theology (PRT) qualifying exams, 19th Century Philosophical, Religious, and Theological Thought. There are eight thinkers on the list: Hegel, Schleiermacher, Schelling, Feuerbach, Kierkegaard, Newman, Nietzsche, and James. We will spend about two classes on the readings assigned for each. We will also spend some time on how to compose the dissertation proposal and how to go about writing theoretical papers in PRT. Students taking the course for credit will have to write the usual 20-30 page paper in addition to faithful attendance and participation in the discussion. Auditors are expected to attend and participate in the discussions faithfully, and will, in addition, write a dissertation proposal to go over with the instructor toward the end of the semester. This course prepares the students for the PRT 19th century qualifying exam by familiarizing them with the intellectual content of the reading list, but it does not guarantee passing the exam. It also helps them with the writing of the dissertation proposal and the basics of writing theoretical papers.

RELIGION
484 3053 1 4   The Idea of Love
TextbookTextbook
Ingolf Dalferth Tue 6:00PM -
8:50PM
IAC Library Love is a central idea in Christianity. God is seen as the source and ground of love, and human relationships are called to be molded on the self-giving love which God has shown towards a creation that has no interest in God. In recent years a number of new studies have come out that explore the idea of love in philosophy, sociology, and theology from a variety of perspectives. The course will study some of the most important of those writings in order to see how the idea of love shapes human life and how life changes where it follows the rule of love.

RELIGION
490TH 3054 1 4   Analytic Philosophy of Religion: The Beginnings
TextbookTextbook
Ingolf Dalferth Tue 9:00AM -
11:50AM
IAC Library Analytic Philosophy of Religion is a way of doing philosophy of religion that came to dominate the English-speaking and Scandinavian countries in the 20th century. Its beginnings were tied up with the style of philosophy developed in Cambridge (G.E. Moore, B. Russell, L. Wittgenstein) and Oxford (G. Ryle, W.L. Austin) in the first part of the century, and it was shaped by the disputes with logical positivism, the debates about verification or falsification as an empirical criterion of meaning, and the close attention of ordinary language philosophy to linguistic detail and the manifold uses of language in human life and practices. The course will concentrate in particular on the beginnings of analytic philosophy in Cambridge and Oxford, and the use of the new conceptual tools of logic and analysis to attack, defend or make sense of religious discourse about God.

RELIGION
499 3280 1 0   Doctoral Study (PhD Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Doctoral Study is the continuation course for a doctoral student to complete their dissertation and other requirements for the degree.

SP&E
318 3350 1 4   Cost Benefit Analysis
TextbookTextbook
Heather Campbell Thu 4:00PM -
6:50PM
Stauffer 106 Cost-benefit analysis is at the core of evaluation and decision making in business, government, education, public health, and nonprofit organizations. This course provides foundational concepts and practical skills, with a focus on how to do and use cost-benefit analysis. Examples are drawn from education, public health, international development, transportation, and disaster mitigation.

SP&E
349F 3214 1 4   US Health Policy
TextbookTextbook
Deborah Freund Sat 9:00AM -
5:30PM
Harper, Board of Trustees Rm Do you ever wonder why despite being the wealthiest country in the world, Americans are sicker and in poorer health on average than elsewhere? Or why our health care and pharmaceutical costs are higher? Or why there are disparities in health by income, race and ethnicity? Do you wonder why legislators in California and Vermont have proposed the adoption of universal insurance through a single payor system? How about what we can do to improve the situation and what the trade-offs are? Do you wonder what the future portends for students as they enter the workforce and must face their own health choices? This class will tackle these questions by studying our country’s health policy choices, those of other countries, and what we can do to improve health in communities and for individuals. And, we will stay up-to date with proposed changes in health policy in Washington. To understand health policy we will ensure an understanding of topics which underpin all of current policies including the socio economics determinants of health, the costs of care, paying for care, health disparities, how patients should be treated including collaboration and integration of care, access to care, our health workforce. The class will feature several very well-known and prominent guest speakers including physicians, hospital executives and others who will share their views of health policy issues and meet the members of class.

SP&E
350 3313 1 4   Theories and Issues in Comparative Politics
TextbookTextbook
Melissa Rogers Wed 4:00PM -
6:50PM
McManus 31 This course introduces major topics in comparative politics and provides basic training for comparative politics graduate students. The main purpose of this course is to introduce key questions as well as classic and modern approaches in comparative politics. The course focuses not on facts but on the task of causal (positive) explanation. It explores the major theoretical and conceptual building blocks in the sub-fields: theory, method, development, violence, culture, institutions, parties, regimes, governance, etc. Each week we discuss a subset of the pertinent scholarly literature, mainly focusing on a major theoretical controversy. We compare and contrast answers to important questions and ask what makes an explanation “good.” We discuss when a theory is most useful and if a complementary theory could be posited that would subsume previously conflicting or incompletely successful theories. Upon completion of this course, students should have an understanding of the intellectual trends in the study of comparative politics, knowledge of key concepts and spheres of debate, and an ability to articulate the strengths and weaknesses of different approaches and issues in comparative politics.

SP&E
352 3317 1 4   Comparative Political Economy
TextbookTextbook
Melissa Rogers Tue 4:00PM -
6:50PM
McManus 31 This course examines the interaction between capitalism and democracy. This class studies how the economy affects politics and how politics—in particular, political institutions—shapes economic policies and outcomes. It explores the impact of global markets on national politics and the impact of politics on economic development in both developed and developing countries. We will also examine how various domestic political conditions (e.g. regime type, partisan politics, and constitutional features) affect economic policies (e.g. tax and welfare, growth, inequality, and poverty). This class has two major goals. First, I want students to be able to understand and critically evaluate the major topics of political economy. Second, students will develop a research paper which can be published and/or presented at a major conference. I know that most graduate students do not have a publishable research paper before they finish their dissertations. However, it is important for students to practice writing their own research papers. We will not only study the major debates in the field, but also write a paper which criticizes the existing literature and suggests proposals for improving it. The paper is a great opportunity for you to develop your dissertation proposal.

SP&E
359 3361 1 4   International Development: Finance, Institutions, and Policy
TextbookTextbook
Graham Bird Wed 9:00AM -
11:50AM
McManus 31 The course will examine economic issues of international finance, in the context of economic development. Material covered will include a review of exchange rate theory, exchange rate policy and the role of international capital flows in the development process.

SP&E
411 3318 1 4   International Political Economy
TextbookTextbook
Yi Feng Mon 7:00PM -
9:50PM
McManus 35 This course offers an introduction to major theories and topics in international political economy for graduate students. It is intended to help graduate students begin to think about how to contribute to the current research frontier in IPE. Readings in the seminar will be a sample of both classics and recent articles on a number of topics across the spectrum of IPE. (PP481 and 482 required prerequisite).

SP&E
448 3315 1 4   Seminar in Social Network Analysis
TextbookTextbook
Zining Yang Tue 7:00PM -
9:50PM
McManus 35 The study of social network analysis, as both a paradigm and quantitative methodology, has attracted an enormous amount of interest in the last few years. This course brings together theoretical concepts and empirical applications from the information and social sciences for the purpose of exploring behavioral relationships across individual, group, and system levels. Topics covered include the measurement and structure of networks, the collection and analysis of network data, and network modeling. This course presents a "hands on" approach to modeling and analysis. Students will be exposed to the mechanics of network analysis, including analytical methods developed in physics, mathematics, statistics, and sociology; across graph theory, computer algorithms, and mathematical models. Special emphasis will be given on various visualizations and applications across different fields, including politics, economics, sociology, and business.

SP&E
471 3316 1 4   Strategic Modeling for Politics, Economics, & Business Decisions
TextbookTextbook
Mark Abdollahian Tue 7:00PM -
9:50PM
Burkle 12 The goal of this course is to provide students with an understanding of several decision-making approaches in political science. The course is divided into four substantive sections emphasizing both theory and applications. The first section deals with a general overview of approaches and assumptions underlying positive decision making in political science. The second section focuses on game theory, the third section centers on expected utility theory and finally the final section deals with spatial bargaining models.

SP&E
486 3320 1 4   Data Analytics & Visualization
TextbookTextbook
Mark Abdollahian Mon 7:00PM -
9:50PM
Stauffer 106 Ready or not, the future is here: more data has been generated in the last 3 years than all of previous human history combined while your smart phone has more computing power than all of NASA in 1969. So what are you going to do about it? This course is a hands on, introduction to applied data analytics and visualization. Political, economic or business strategy drives which best practice theories, data, models and methods get implemented, turning insights into action for data driven decision making. Thus we will cover current state-of-art business intelligence, data analytics, predictive analytics and visualization techniques used across academia, industry and policy circles. We will survey and apply over 20 different methods and tools (including econometrics, big data, game theory, network analysis, social media, machine learning, sentiment analysis and data mining) to solve real world political, economic and business issues. Successful course completion will give you directly marketable and differentiable analytic and software skills in both academic research and private sector professions. The course can count as a methods class for across SPE MA and PhD fields.

SP&E
488 3321 1 4   Data Analysis Using SAS/R
TextbookTextbook
Yi Feng Mon 1:00PM -
3:50PM
Academic Computing 126 There are two aspects in the purpose of this course. First, it is designed to train and prepare students in the Statistical Applications Software (SAS), one of the most extensively used statistical software in academic research as well as government and private sectors such as banks and insurance companies. Second, it teaches research methodology with SAS techniques, particularly relevant for international studies as applications. The primary activity of the course will be a series of coding training in the computer lab. Students will learn specialized techniques of data management and reporting. The class will also cover through SAS various methods for political and economic analysis, forecasting techniques, economic and financial modeling, time series analysis, financial reporting, categorical data analysis, limited dependent variable estimation, simultaneous equations estimation, mixed model applications, statistical graphics, geographical information, and a great deal of other modules. The expected learning outcomes include an increase in students’ quantitative and computer skills in research, data management, and statistical analysis as well as improvement of students’ competiveness in the job market where SAS skills are required.

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405I 3339 1 4   Data Analytical Tools, Technologies and Applications Across the Disciplines
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Hovig Tchalian Wed 5:30PM -
8:20PM
Reef 771-2 (1933 S Broadwy LA) Class meets in Los Angeles (CGU @ The Reef, 1933 S. Broadway, Los Angeles). This course focuses on using Big Data tools and technologies effectively across various disciplines and settings – social sciences, humanities, information systems, policy, and healthcare. The enormous volume, velocity, and variety of data created every day from social media in the form of Twitter feeds, Facebook posts, and countless other platforms and sensors show no signs of abating. This constant stream of data has created enormous hype and promise around what big data can do for all of us – researchers, managers, policy-makers, patients, and consumers. However, this hype often overshadows evidence and examples of genuinely productive applications of data analytical tools and techniques. This course assumes that data, no matter how “big,” can’t become information or true knowledge until users know not only what it is but what it’s for. We therefore take an applied, hands-on approach to learning about, using, and managing data-analytic tools, exploring not only the what, but the how and the why, of big data tools. The course is built around numerous case studies and an applied project that uses data analytics to solve a real-world problem, concluding with findings and a presentation.

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407O 3338 1 4   Corruption
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Robert Klitgaard Mon 4:00PM -
6:50PM
McManus 35 Around the world, corruption is high on the list of challenges. This course examines corruption from a variety of academic perspectives, and then what might be done to reduce, though alas never eradicate, corruption. By working through case studies, we assess the uses and limitations of theory, data, and international collaboration. We study countries such as Afghanistan, Brazil, China, Colombia, Georgia, Haiti, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Mexico, the Philippines, Singapore, South Sudan, Uganda, and the United States. Although the course focuses on corruption, it engages with fundamental issues about the possibilities and limitations of theory, data, and working across cultures.

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407P 3330 1 4   Diplomacy
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Sallama Shaker Tue 4:00PM -
6:50PM
Burkle 16 Isaac Newton defined diplomacy as "tact is the knack of making a point without making an enemy." This seminar will introduce students to the Art of Diplomacy by providing them with the necessary tools to practice diplomacy. Using case studies of diplomatic practices, past and the present, engaging with Ambassadors-at-Large, and working through collaborative simulation exercises, students will gain a better understanding of the strategies and tactics used to overcome conflicts and build bridges in a complex, globalized world. Additionally, the course will analyze Sustainable Development Goals as an applied multilateral case study in diplomacy that will enable students to visit the United Nations during the course.

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407Q 3329 1 4   The Epicness of Gilgamesh: Sex, Power, and Placement
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Tammi Schneider Tue 9:00AM -
11:50AM
Art 126 CGU recently received a collection by an important Syrian artist centered around the Epic of Gilgamesh, an ancient Akkadian text with third millennium Sumerian prototypes. In this course, we will examine the ancient myth of Gilgamesh, its modern discovery and impact it had on its interpretation, as well as concepts of religion, masculinity and gender revealed in the ancient text. We will also study CGU’s own art collection and its roots in the Syrian context of the late twentieth century, and students will mount the initial exhibit of the collection at CGU, incorporating experiential learning around the issues and mechanics of mounting and presenting and exhibit rich with historical and modern significance.

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407R 3325 1 4   The Practice of Self-Management
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Jeremy Hunter Mon 1:00PM -
3:50PM
Burkle 26 Class meets Mondays starting 1/27. Additional meeting dates: Sun 2/24 (10am-3:30pm in Downtown Los Angeles), Sun 4/14 (10am-3:30pm at Los Angeles County Museum of Art). See department for meeting location details. The Practice of Self-Management systematically develops skills that lead to personal and professional effectiveness. The primary assumption of the class holds that nothing else is done well without first having solid skills in personal management. The class is oriented around reading, exercises and discussion, and is writing intensive.

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407S 3328 1 4   Globalization and Its Human Challenges
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Anselm Min Mon 7:00PM -
9:50PM
IAC Library This is a comprehensive study of globalization. On the basis of important recent publications we will study the many aspects of globalization, economic, ecological, political, military, cultural, religious, and migratory, study them in their interconnectedness, not in isolation, ask about their total consequences and impact on humanity, who are both agents and victims of globalization, especially on human dignity and human solidarity, and raise critical questions about how to promote human dignity and human solidarity against the many challenges of division and oppression often produced by globalization today. We are not interested in any of those aspects—economic, political, etc.-- for its own sake but always for what it does for human well-being, human suffering, and solidarity among human beings who have to learn to live together with a minimum of justice and peace for all their differences. This is a broadly ethical approach to globalization but also based on the empirical facts of globalization as discovered by studies in the seven different areas (economic, ecological, political, military, cultural, religious, and migratory). This is an essentially multidisciplinary approach to globalization from the human perspective. We will ask how globalization—in its many aspects—concretely promotes human dignity and human solidarity and/or further destroys human dignity and human solidarity and how to respond to the many ethical issues it raises.

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301 3055 1 4   Introduction to Women's & Gender Studies
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Candida Jaquez Mon 7:00PM -
9:50PM
Burkle 22 This course is a highly theoretical introduction to some of the key historical and current theoretical concepts in women and gender studies from transnational and interdisciplinary perspectives as informed by diverse communities. The only REQUIRED course for the Women's and Gender Studies Program.

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340 3116 1 4   Queer and Trans People of Color
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Victor Corona Wed 7:00PM -
9:50PM
Burkle 22 Using an interdisciplinary approach, the purpose of this course is to explore the narratives and expressive culture of QTPOC (Queer and Transgender People of Color) individuals and communities. Topics such as gender, sexuality, race, ethnicity, and other intersections of identity (e.g., ability, age, class, religion, etc.) will be used to explain and comprehend how QTPOC live as minorities within minorities/dual minorities. The course will use Queer of Color Critique and draw from Intersectionality and Queer Theory to frame in-class discussions of how historical, cultural, educational, social, and political movements have shaped the lived experiences of QTPOC. The course is comprised of three modules that will first introduce students to theory, followed by an understanding of research, and finally how both can be merged into practice. Students will utilize research, literature, media, art, films, along with guest and personal narratives to understand how QTPOC constitute, subvert, and reinvent multiple social identities in the larger social world.