1. Choose  "Term" from drop-down & click  "Confirm choice."
2. Choose "Subject" click "Search" & click "+" icon in "Subj" column for detail.
3. Sort columns by clicking headings.

 

- *ALL
Keyword filter:
Subj Cat# Class# Sect Units Mod Course Faculty Day Time Location Note Description

AFR
405 1255 W 4   Franz Fanon
TextbookTextbook
Darrell Moore Mon 1:10PM -
3:00PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. In many scholarly accounts, Frantz Fanon (1925-1961) was a seminal thinker of decolonization in the 20th century. In an oeuvre brought into print in a nine-year period between 1952-1961, Fanon’s struggle to imagine and bring into language and action de-colonial thinking engaged and transformed major cultural, philosophical, political intellectual currents of his historical time and place including existentialism, Marxism, Negritude, phenomenology, and psychoanalysis. His engagements oriented toward decolonial practice transformed those intellectual currents. In this course, we will read Fanon’s collected works – plays, philosophical and political essays, newspaper articles, and lectures, to inquire into how he problematized the pressing issues of his present. In addition, we will read contemporary thinkers (e.g., Homi Bhabha, Achille Mbembe, Gayatri Spivak, Sylvia Wynter) to consider how they bring Fanon’s mode of problematization and inquiry into the 21st century.

AGS
300 1258 W 4   Applied Feminist Applications
TextbookTextbook
Linda Perkins Tue 5:50PM -
7:40PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. Applied Gender Studies 300 is a course designed to incorporate contemporary practices with activist-based perspectives. This course presents an overview of domestic and global feminism through the examination of advocacy, nonprofit organizations, and community service utilizing the perspectives from a variety of sources.

AGS
400M 1158 1 0   Continuous Registration (MA Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Continuous Registration is the continuation course for a master's level student to complete requirements for the degree.

ARCH
310 1133 W 4   Introduction to Archival Studies
TextbookTextbook
Gabriele Carey Mon 8:30AM -
10:20AM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. This course introduces students to archival theory and practice, covering a variety of issues and principles related to professional work with archives, records, and special collections. It will introduce students to fundamental archival skills and methods. Specific topics will include accessioning and appraisals, arrangement and description, preservation, security, archives users, and ethics and standards. Students will also get a chance to work with original materials and do some hands-on work in archival processing at Special Collections, Honnold/Mudd Library. ARCH 310 counts as a Research methods course.

ARMGT
300 1128 W 4   Arts Organization Dynamics
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Thu 8:30AM -
10:20AM
TBA Instructor: Laura Zucker. Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. This survey course explores the theories, processes, and practices behind operations of nonprofit arts organizations today. Practical applications will focus on developing skills to manage arts organizations. Topics covered will be working with boards, human resources, facilities, and program development, including arts education and community engagement, and may change topically. Guest speakers who are leaders in the field will add diverse perspectives. Focus on specifics types of arts organizations will depend upon the interests of the students in the course. In teams, students will create each component of a new organization from mission statement to the final presentation that includes all aspects of the organization. Students individually will also select an arts organization, similar in some way(s) to the virtual organization that they will develop during the semester. Through conversations with this organization's staff they will research how course issues play out in this institution.

ARMGT
301 1101 W 4   Legal Foundations for Creative Industries
TextbookTextbook
Kibum Kim Tue 8:30AM -
10:20AM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. Beginning with a brief history of the United States' legal system, we will trace the evolution of laws that affect creative expression and business ventures. We will explore the differences amongst protections available for intellectual properties; examine the construction and application of contracts; and distinguish the various business models available to creative entrepreneurial endeavors. Our study and discussion will also include coverage of Autheticity and Title, First Amendment issues and Artists' Rights. Students will engage in hands-on exercises like developing mission and vision statements for creative organizations and negotiating art world deals. Classes may also include presentations from guest speakers addressing how the law affects specific roles and concerns of artists, dealers, collectors, curators and/or auctioneers. Active participation is required from all students.

ARMGT
308 1123 W 0 - 1 M1 Arts Management On-Site (Field Study Travel)
TextbookTextbook
Amy Shimshon-Santo ThuFriSatSun  -
TBA Online class. Arts Management on Site introduces students to the businesses, institutions, artists, innovators, and leaders that shape the art world at present through travel to both regional and international venues where the art business is at its most active. Travel is shaped by the art world calendar and its ever changing menu of events. All students are required to participate in field study travel.

ARMGT
310A 1124 W 2 M1 Principals & Practices of Fundraising 1
TextbookTextbook
Robin R Sukhadia Tue 5:50PM -
7:40PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. Principles and Practices of Fundraising (310A) introduces students to the fundamentals of philanthropy and fundraising in the arts. The course presents critical concepts and pragmatic applications for raising funds for the visual and performing arts across different genres, settings, and scales. Informative reading, case study review, critical discussions, written assignments, and guest speakers will immerse students in the key ideas, pragmatic tools, and core relationships needed for successful fundraising in the arts. Students will become familiar with comprehensive fundraising planning, cultivation, solicitation, and stewardship using old and new technologies. Participation in this course will prepare students to enhance the impact of the arts on our lives and communities through thoughtful planning and action.

ARMGT
310B 1127 W 2 M2 Principals & Practices of Fundraising 2
TextbookTextbook
Robin R Sukhadia Tue 5:50PM -
7:40PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. (Pre-requisite ArtBus/Artmgt 310A) Fundraising has become a key responsibility of qualified leaders in the arts. In this pragmatic and critical course students will study cutting edge trends in development, form a leadership vision for arts fundraising, and practice core development competencies that prepare them to raise funds for visual and performing arts organizations across genre, scale, and setting. Course readings, case studies, critical discussions, written assignments, and guest speakers will deepen students’ understanding of key ideas, historical foundations, and catalytic changes shaping philanthropy today. Building from the comprehensive fundraising plans developed in 310A, students will gain hands-on experience in cultivation, solicitation, and stewardship — from prospect research to proposal development, reporting to evaluation, and analogue to online relationship building. Students will deepen their understanding of how fundraising can enhance the impact of the arts on our lives and communities.

ARMGT
317 1096 W1 4   Finance and Accounting for Creative Industries
TextbookTextbook
Jay Prag Iv, James Wallace Mon 8:30AM -
10:20AM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. Finance is the study of the allocation of capital (money) from lenders or savers to borrowers. Typically, the ultimate borrower is a firm or an entrepreneur who is attempting to build or acquire productive, profitable assets. When this process is studied from the point of view of the lender, the class is usually called "Investments". When the borrower's point of view is studied, we generally call the class "Corporate Finance." Many of the same theories are studied in both classes because these two classes are studying the same fundamental process. We will draw on many areas in constructing a method for financing a profitable corporation. Obviously finance theories are important but we will also use economics, accounting and management concepts. There are essentially two philosophies regarding the proper approach to teaching financial accounting. Perhaps the more traditional approach takes the perspective of the preparer, whereby the emphasis is on the proper recording of transactions. This debits and credits approach is very useful for anybody contemplating a career as an accountant. It is my belief that this approach is also responsible for accounting’s reputation as “"boring" and just a bunch of rules to be learned. We will be following a second teaching philosophy, whereby we study accounting from the perspective of the user/manager. The ultimate goal from this section will be for you to read and understand the output from the financial accounting process, the financial statements. While this is not a class is either statement preparation or statement analysis, we will do a little of each. Still, the goal is understand the basic rules governing the preparation of financial statements, the flexibility that exists within these rules, the possible incentives of management to make choices from within these rules, and the output from this environment.

ARMGT
317 1098 W2 4   Finance and Accounting for Creative Industries
TextbookTextbook
Jay Prag Iv, James Wallace Mon 1:10PM -
3:00PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. Finance is the study of the allocation of capital (money) from lenders or savers to borrowers. Typically, the ultimate borrower is a firm or an entrepreneur who is attempting to build or acquire productive, profitable assets. When this process is studied from the point of view of the lender, the class is usually called "Investments". When the borrower's point of view is studied, we generally call the class "Corporate Finance." Many of the same theories are studied in both classes because these two classes are studying the same fundamental process. We will draw on many areas in constructing a method for financing a profitable corporation. Obviously finance theories are important but we will also use economics, accounting and management concepts. There are essentially two philosophies regarding the proper approach to teaching financial accounting. Perhaps the more traditional approach takes the perspective of the preparer, whereby the emphasis is on the proper recording of transactions. This debits and credits approach is very useful for anybody contemplating a career as an accountant. It is my belief that this approach is also responsible for accounting’s reputation as “"boring" and just a bunch of rules to be learned. We will be following a second teaching philosophy, whereby we study accounting from the perspective of the user/manager. The ultimate goal from this section will be for you to read and understand the output from the financial accounting process, the financial statements. While this is not a class is either statement preparation or statement analysis, we will do a little of each. Still, the goal is understand the basic rules governing the preparation of financial statements, the flexibility that exists within these rules, the possible incentives of management to make choices from within these rules, and the output from this environment.

ARMGT
321A 1105 W 2 M2 Marketing Management
TextbookTextbook
Steven Chen Wed 8:30AM -
10:20AM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. Marketing Management focuses on marketing and its role within organizations. It introduces the marketing concept, examines its relationship to other functions in the firm and looks at techniques and frameworks used to examine marketing environments, understand consumer and organizational buying behavior, segment markets and position products, develop new products, manage existing products and promote, price and place products. No pre-requisites.

ARMGT
325 1107 W 2 M1 Strategic Communications for Art, Culture, and Media
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Thu 10:50AM -
12:40PM
TBA Instructor: Leticia Buckley. Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. This course will cover the application of strategic communications for the arts, culture, and media. "Strategic communications" is the coordinated and planned delivery of messages, actions, images, and other forms of engagement to inform, influence, or persuade selected audiences in support of organizational objectives. In today’s 21st century digital environment the design of the customer experience (CX) in arts, cultural, and media organizations is critical to the development of audience affinity, engagement, and support. The question is how to build support with various audiences, especially millennial audiences, and provide the compelling emotional and spiritual benefits they desire through the strategic use of communications across different platforms (social media, streaming video, podcasts, etc.). This course will examine how to leverage the tools of communications and marketing during a time when society and technology are changing faster than most companies' and organizations' abilities to adapt to that rapid change. To effectively compete, leaders in the arts, culture, and media must become nimble, agile, and audience-centric. Strategic communication is how firms and organizations respond, compete, and succeed.

ARMGT
353 1125 W 2   Strategic Planning in the Arts
TextbookTextbook
John E McGuirk, Hovig Tchalian Sat 10:00AM -
5:50PM
TBA Online class. Class meets on Saturday (10am-6pm) 9/19, 10/17, 11/7. Strategic planning is the process of defining an organization's mission and goals and allocating the resources necessary to achieve them over time. Smart, savvy planning has become critical for success within the rapidly changing environment for not-for-profit arts and culture organizations. In this course, Arts Management students will examine multiple approaches to developing and implementing a strategic plan. Students will also learn and apply methods and frameworks for critical reasoning, complex problem-solving and oral and written communication. Coupled with a foundation in the strategic planning process, these core strategic thinking skills will help students design effective solutions to strategic challenges by asking the right questions, first. The course will include lectures, case studies, group discussions, and hands-on experiential activities. The course format is practice-based, with a focus on learning by doing. We will therefore directly apply the approaches and frameworks we learn, often to a case or mini-project. Note that this course is team taught, with some sessions led by one of the two instructors but an integrated structure that applies all concepts and frameworks taught in the course in each assignment and course session.

ARMGT
377C 1126 W 2 M1 Curatorial Practice: Exhibition Organization/Opening
TextbookTextbook
Irene Tsatsos, Alma Ruiz Mon 5:50PM -
7:40PM
TBA Instructors: Alma Ruiz and Irene Tsatsos. Online class. The course covers exhibition planning and scheduling; artist, curator, collector, and agency relations; loans; budgeting and funding; insurance, shipping, and handling; third-party contracts; catalog and collateral materials production; marketing; programming; and staffing. We will investigate a broad range of practices, policies, and protocols in museums as well as in non- profit organizations, artist-run/alternative galleries, site-specific installations, and other kinds of public interventions. ARTBUS/ARMGT 377A and 377B are mandatory prerequisites.

ARMGT
377D 1309 W 2 M2 Curatorial Practices: Exhibition, Program, and Assessment
TextbookTextbook
Irene Tsatsos, Alma Ruiz Mon 5:50PM -
7:40PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. Part practicum, part lab, this class is a continuation of 377C and will result in a group exhibition, organized by students (under the direction of faculty), who will work collaboratively on one of several teams. Students are asked to come up with an exhibition design, education program, and marketing plan, and to develop and execute other aspects of exhibition-making and managing, with creative solutions to exhibition problems governed by different kinds of constraints, such as limited budgets, availability of key works, or visitor access. This class requires time flexibility; students should be prepared to do work between classes. ARTBUS/ARMGT 377A, 377B, and 377C are mandatory prerequisites.

ARMGT
380A 1114 W 2 M2 Collections Management
TextbookTextbook
Rebecca M Norris Mon 3:30PM -
5:20PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. The ability to manage a museum or private collection is a fundamental component in maintaining a sustainable art collection both from a conservation standpoint as well from a market value perspective. Collections management practices establish the basis for creating and implementing policies on acquisition, de-acquisition, documentation, storage and conservation. This course will provide a solid foundation in collection management theory, policy and practice in both museum and private collection contexts.

ARMGT
383 1111 W1 2 M1 Economics of Strategy
TextbookTextbook
Jay Prag Iv Mon 8:30AM -
10:20AM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. The Economics of Strategy uses the business-related tenets of economics (old and new) to generate a modern, consistent, formal framework for strategic decision-making. Using economic intuition we will be able to address issues ranging from outsourcing to new product lines. We will be able to explain why some firms actively compete through price changes and while others in apparently similar competitive industries do not. Economic theories seem very abstract to many students because these theories usually assume many unrealistic things about people and society. Students must be mindful of the fact that these assumptions are what allow economists to answer many otherwise intractable questions. The results that we attain usually hold even without these simplifying assumptions. This class will show how some of these economic models can provide a powerful, formal framework for answering managerial questions ranging from dealing with competition to setting proper incentives for managers.

ARMGT
383 1112 W2 2 M1 Economics of Strategy
TextbookTextbook
Jay Prag Iv Mon 1:10PM -
3:00PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. The Economics of Strategy uses the business-related tenets of economics (old and new) to generate a modern, consistent, formal framework for strategic decision-making. Using economic intuition we will be able to address issues ranging from outsourcing to new product lines. We will be able to explain why some firms actively compete through price changes and while others in apparently similar competitive industries do not. Economic theories seem very abstract to many students because these theories usually assume many unrealistic things about people and society. Students must be mindful of the fact that these assumptions are what allow economists to answer many otherwise intractable questions. The results that we attain usually hold even without these simplifying assumptions. This class will show how some of these economic models can provide a powerful, formal framework for answering managerial questions ranging from dealing with competition to setting proper incentives for managers.

ARMGT
401B 1122 1 4   Arts Management Practicum
TextbookTextbook
Genevieve Kaplan, Amy Shimshon-Santo Wed 1:10PM -
3:00PM
To Be Determined Additional hour of online content required each week. Class meets in Los Angeles (CGU @ The Reef, 1933 S. Broadway, Los Angeles). All classes held at The Reef require a parking fee of $6.00 (Pre-requisite: Course #401A) Successful completion of this course prepares students to fulfill the practicum thesis option for the master’s degree in Arts Management. Building on the plan of applied study defined in course 401A, students implement and complete an arts management project serving an arts organization, collective, or network. Students work individually, or in teams, to fulfill a contract for services, conduct a project, create a deliverable for a client, and compose a final report. Participants will gain expertise in how arts organizations work, expand their social networks in the arts and culture, and grow as creative thinkers and qualified arts management practitioners.

ARMGT
410 1338 W 0   Creative Industries Colloquium
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty, Kibum Kim, Amy Shimshon-Santo Thu 6:30PM -
8:00PM
TBA Instructors: Jonathan Neil, Kibum Kim, Amy Shinshon-Santo. Online class. Class meets on 9/3, 9/17, 10/1, 10/15, 10/29, 11/12. The series of Arts and Culture Conversations give students in the Arts Management and Art Business degree programs an introduction to the artists and professionals that are shaping the landscape and discourse of the arts in Los Angeles and beyond. Taking place over seven evenings, each session is built around a specific theme or area of activity that is affecting the LA arts and cultural community. Participants speak to their own experiences in their industries and to the challenges and opportunities facing their fields, businesses, and organizations today. Students are given opportunities to engage the invited artists, leaders, and industry professionals in Q&A’s following the conversations and to network during the receptions that follow.

ART
301 1068 1 1 - 3   Studio Art
TextbookTextbook
David Amico Tue 11:00AM -
4:50PM
Studios Individual studio visits scheduled on Tuesdays from 11am-5pm and Wednesdays from 10am-3pm. See department for details. Art 301 Studio Art is a graduate-level course in which the student meets one-on-one with core faculty to discuss the student's work.

ART
301 1069 2 1 - 3   Studio Art
TextbookTextbook
David Pagel Tue 10:00AM -
2:30PM
Studios Individual studio visits scheduled on Tuesdays from 10am-2:30pm. See department for details. Art 301 Studio Art is a graduate-level course in which the student meets one-on-one with core faculty to discuss the student's work.

ART
302 1070 1 1 - 2   Studio Art
TextbookTextbook
Carmine Iannaccone Fri 10:00AM -
3:30PM
Studios Art 302 Studio Art is a graduate-level course in which the student meets one-on-one with adjunct faculty to discuss the student's work.

ART
302 1071 2 1 - 2   Studio Art
TextbookTextbook
Julian Hoeber Tue 12:30PM -
5:20PM
Studios Art 302 Studio Art is a graduate-level course in which the student meets one-on-one with adjunct faculty to discuss the student's work.

ART
302 1072 3 1 - 2   Studio Art
TextbookTextbook
Michael Reafsnyder Tue 9:00AM -
2:30PM
Studios Art 302 Studio Art is a graduate-level course in which the student meets one-on-one with adjunct faculty to discuss the student's work.

ART
302 1073 4 1 - 2   Studio Art
TextbookTextbook
Iva Gueorguieva Tue 11:30AM -
5:20PM
Studios Art 302 Studio Art is a graduate-level course in which the student meets one-on-one with adjunct faculty to discuss the student's work.

ART
302 1074 5 1 - 2   Studio Art
TextbookTextbook
Amy Santoferraro Tue 11:00AM -
4:30PM
Studios Art 302 Studio Art is a graduate-level course in which the student meets one-on-one with adjunct faculty to discuss the student's work.

ART
302 1465 6 1 - 2   Studio Art
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Mon 11:00AM -
4:30PM
Studios Instructor: Kyla Hansen Art 302 Studio Art is a graduate-level course in which the student meets one-on-one with adjunct faculty to discuss the student's work.

ART
302 1469 7 1 - 2   Studio Art
TextbookTextbook
Erik N Frydenborg Wed 11:00AM -
3:50PM
Studios Art 302 Studio Art is a graduate-level course in which the student meets one-on-one with adjunct faculty to discuss the student's work.

ART
302 1481 8 1 - 2   Studio Art
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Wed 10:00AM -
3:30PM
Studios Instructor: Umar Rashid Art 302 Studio Art is a graduate-level course in which the student meets one-on-one with adjunct faculty to discuss the student's work.

ART
344A 1075 W 4   Ideas in Contemporary Art
TextbookTextbook
Carmine Iannaccone Thu 1:10PM -
3:00PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. "The Grand Tour". Many commentators believe that what has been called the Golden Age of critical theory is now over. They're probably right, but just because it's over, doesn't mean it's finished. Anything as far-reaching as the body of thought that is also known as "Continental Theory" will permanently bend the light through which all successive history is viewed, to one degree or another. These theories were influential not just because they got written, but also because of how they were interpreted, discussed, unloaded and applied by legions of others in a process that (for better or for worse) is certainly still underway. And that may make it crucial to understand the theories now more than ever. The process of exegesis can become vapid and attenuate the original ideas, to the point where we forget what made them revolutionary in the first place. As more and more people talk about them, the key terms become markers of fashion rather than insight. Anyone can now throw around the word "deconstruction" and sound very informed, hip, and up-to-date without needing to know what deconstruction means. That's a problem.

ART
349 1076 W 4   Survey of Contemporary Art
TextbookTextbook
David Pagel Fri 12:20PM -
3:10PM
TBA Online class This class introduces students to some of the most influential art made in California, New York, and Europe from just before the beginning of the 1960s to just after. It examines the transatlantic and transcontinental dialogues that emerged among artists before globalism transformed the art-world into what is now: a multinational, corporate-style enterprise that combines aspects of the entertainment industry, the education business, and naked commercial speculation.

ART
395 1077 W 2   Written Statement Seminar
TextbookTextbook
David Pagel Tue 3:30PM -
5:20PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. Second and third semester seminar for preparation of written statement to accompany advancement meeting and final thesis exhibition.

ART
396 1078 1 3 - 15   MFA Project
TextbookTextbook
David Amico Tue 10:00AM -
4:50PM
No Room Needed Thesis defense with the three members of your MFA committee.

ART
396 1079 2 3 - 15   MFA Project
TextbookTextbook
Rachel Lachowicz Tue 10:00AM -
4:50PM
No Room Needed Thesis defense with the three members of your MFA committee.

ARTBUS
300A 1099 W 4   Art Market Dynamics
TextbookTextbook
Kibum Kim Tue 1:10PM -
3:00PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. This course introduces students to the structures and dynamics of international art markets: the people, places, institutions and organizations responsible for the flow of works around the globe as well as by and through which they gain their value. In fact, value is a core organizing concept around which this course is built. What makes works of art valuable? What determines their price? Why are some artists considered relevant and others not? What confers relevance, and hence, scarcity? From the artist’s studio to art history, from the museum to the auction house, from the art fair to the international biennial, from the arts pages of the major daily newspapers to the esoteric world of academic journals, and from the law courts to insurance policies – what confers value on a work of art, and how?

ARTBUS
301 1100 W 4   Legal Foundations for Creative Industries
TextbookTextbook
Kibum Kim Tue 8:30AM -
10:20AM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. Beginning with a brief history of the United States' legal system, we will trace the evolution of laws that affect creative expression and business ventures. We will explore the differences amongst protections available for intellectual properties; examine the construction and application of contracts; and distinguish the various business models available to creative entrepreneurial endeavors. Our study and discussion will also include coverage of Autheticity and Title, First Amendment issues and Artists' Rights. Students will engage in hands-on exercises like developing mission and vision statements for creative organizations and negotiating art world deals. Classes may also include presentations from guest speakers addressing how the law affects specific roles and concerns of artists, dealers, collectors, curators and/or auctioneers. Active participation is required from all students.

ARTBUS
309B 1102 W 4   Startup Studio
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty, Hovig Tchalian Wed 1:10PM -
3:00PM
TBA Instructors: Jonathan Neil and Hovig Tchalian. Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. Students who pursue the entrepreneurship sequence in the CMCI finish their degree with the Startup Studio. The studio is designed as an open forum in which students work on their final MA capstone projects, usually entrepreneurial enterprises of one genre or another that are presented to panels of faculty and professionals at the end of the semester in which the studio is taken. The studio offers students an open, collaborative environment in which to develop their ideas and to learn from one another. Regular visits from industry professionals, entrepreneurs, institutional leaders, and visiting faculty provide feedback on projects in development.

ARTBUS
312 1108 W 2 M1 Fine Art as a Financial Asset
TextbookTextbook
Rosemary Ringwald, Thu 5:50PM -
7:40PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. Art is an asset but it is increasingly being purchased as an investment asset despite its lack of return and the expenses associated with maintaining it. This course will examine the individual art investor who wants to (1) leverage his or her collection; (2) gift art to family members or charitable organizations during life; (3) leave art to family members or charitable organizations upon death; (4) establish a private art museum to house the investor’s collection; and finally (5) explore corporate art collecting as an investment asset. The course will begin by laying the foundation for an understanding of the planning process by lectures on educational modules devoted to income tax, gift tax, estate tax, trust and estate planning basics. Planning strategies will be reviewed and discussed for their applicability to a client’s particular situation as will the advantages and disadvantages of each strategy. The course will provide an understanding of the mechanics behind the art lending process and provide real life examples of clients who are utilizing this form of leverage with their art collections.

ARTBUS
314 1478 W 2   Intensive: The Art Auction Business
TextbookTextbook
Jeffrey Moran Wed 6:30PM -
9:00PM
TBA Online class. Meets on specific dates: Wed. 9/9, 9/23, 10/7, 10/21, 11/4, 11/18, 12/9. Additional online content required. This course introduces students to the inner workings of the auction business by focusing on what actually happens in the auction sale room and behind the scenes. Key moments in auction house history are combined with the evolution of the rules and regulations that govern the auction world. Students are given an inside perspective to buying and selling at auction, the fine points of “saleroom science,” and how the major auction houses compete for business, clients and market share. Students are given a unique opportunity to understand how auctioneers practice their trade by learning the skills required and the techniques employed in conducting fine art auctions. The life line of a piece of art at auction will be followed behind the scenes from loading dock to auction block.

ARTBUS
317 1095 W1 4   Finance and Accounting for Creative Industries
TextbookTextbook
Jay Prag Iv, James Wallace Mon 8:30AM -
10:20AM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. Finance is the study of the allocation of capital (money) from lenders or savers to borrowers. Typically, the ultimate borrower is a firm or an entrepreneur who is attempting to build or acquire productive, profitable assets. When this process is studied from the point of view of the lender, the class is usually called "Investments". When the borrower's point of view is studied, we generally call the class "Corporate Finance." Many of the same theories are studied in both classes because these two classes are studying the same fundamental process. We will draw on many areas in constructing a method for financing a profitable corporation. Obviously finance theories are important but we will also use economics, accounting and management concepts. There are essentially two philosophies regarding the proper approach to teaching financial accounting. Perhaps the more traditional approach takes the perspective of the preparer, whereby the emphasis is on the proper recording of transactions. This debits and credits approach is very useful for anybody contemplating a career as an accountant. It is my belief that this approach is also responsible for accounting’s reputation as “"boring" and just a bunch of rules to be learned. We will be following a second teaching philosophy, whereby we study accounting from the perspective of the user/manager. The ultimate goal from this section will be for you to read and understand the output from the financial accounting process, the financial statements. While this is not a class is either statement preparation or statement analysis, we will do a little of each. Still, the goal is understand the basic rules governing the preparation of financial statements, the flexibility that exists within these rules, the possible incentives of management to make choices from within these rules, and the output from this environment.

ARTBUS
317 1097 W2 4   Finance and Accounting for Creative Industries
TextbookTextbook
Jay Prag Iv, James Wallace Mon 1:10PM -
3:00PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. Finance is the study of the allocation of capital (money) from lenders or savers to borrowers. Typically, the ultimate borrower is a firm or an entrepreneur who is attempting to build or acquire productive, profitable assets. When this process is studied from the point of view of the lender, the class is usually called "Investments". When the borrower's point of view is studied, we generally call the class "Corporate Finance." Many of the same theories are studied in both classes because these two classes are studying the same fundamental process. We will draw on many areas in constructing a method for financing a profitable corporation. Obviously finance theories are important but we will also use economics, accounting and management concepts. There are essentially two philosophies regarding the proper approach to teaching financial accounting. Perhaps the more traditional approach takes the perspective of the preparer, whereby the emphasis is on the proper recording of transactions. This debits and credits approach is very useful for anybody contemplating a career as an accountant. It is my belief that this approach is also responsible for accounting’s reputation as “"boring" and just a bunch of rules to be learned. We will be following a second teaching philosophy, whereby we study accounting from the perspective of the user/manager. The ultimate goal from this section will be for you to read and understand the output from the financial accounting process, the financial statements. While this is not a class is either statement preparation or statement analysis, we will do a little of each. Still, the goal is understand the basic rules governing the preparation of financial statements, the flexibility that exists within these rules, the possible incentives of management to make choices from within these rules, and the output from this environment.

ARTBUS
318 1121 W 2   Looking at and Writing about Art for Arts Professionals
TextbookTextbook
Edward D Schad, . Faculty Wed 5:50PM -
7:40PM
TBA Instructors: Jonathan Neil and Edward Schad. Online class. Class meets Wed 9/16, 9/30, 10/14, 10/28, 11/11, 12/2, 12/16. Additional hour of online content required each week. This course teaches practical writing about visual art. Whereas many writing courses focus on the theory and practice of ‘criticism’ exclusively, as if this were the only genre of art writing that matters, this course will look at a wider range of genres of, and contexts for, writing about art and artists. Participants will focus on describing the specifics of what they see and encounter, in terms of artworks themselves and the institutional settings that frame and inform them. Genres and forms that will be introduced, and which students in the course will write themselves, include artist profiles, wall texts, and press releases, as well as short critical reviews and coverage pieces. Except for a final writing assignment, artists and topics for writing will be assigned at random to mimic the type of writing that arises in art world jobs. It is exceedingly rare to have a choice of topics to write about, therefore topics will be assigned by the instructors (just as they would be by a Department Head, an Editor, a Museum Director or a Chief Curator).

ARTBUS
321A 1104 W 2 M2 Marketing Management
TextbookTextbook
Steven Chen Wed 8:30AM -
10:20AM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. Marketing Management focuses on marketing and its role within organizations. It introduces the marketing concept, examines its relationship to other functions in the firm and looks at techniques and frameworks used to examine marketing environments, understand consumer and organizational buying behavior, segment markets and position products, develop new products, manage existing products and promote, price and place products. No pre-requisites.

ARTBUS
325 1106 W 2 M1 Strategic Communications for Art, Culture, and Media
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Thu 10:50AM -
12:40PM
TBA Instructor: Leticia Buckley. Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. This course will cover the application of strategic communications for the arts, culture, and media. "Strategic communications" is the coordinated and planned delivery of messages, actions, images, and other forms of engagement to inform, influence, or persuade selected audiences in support of organizational objectives. In today’s 21st century digital environment the design of the customer experience (CX) in arts, cultural, and media organizations is critical to the development of audience affinity, engagement, and support. The question is how to build support with various audiences, especially millennial audiences, and provide the compelling emotional and spiritual benefits they desire through the strategic use of communications across different platforms (social media, streaming video, podcasts, etc.). This course will examine how to leverage the tools of communications and marketing during a time when society and technology are changing faster than most companies' and organizations' abilities to adapt to that rapid change. To effectively compete, leaders in the arts, culture, and media must become nimble, agile, and audience-centric. Strategic communication is how firms and organizations respond, compete, and succeed.

ARTBUS
350 1117 1 4   Sotheby's Institute of Art NY Track I
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Please contact the department for more information regarding the courses details. COURSE OPEN ONLY TO THIRD SEMESTER STUDENTS ATTENDING SIA NY

ARTBUS
351 1118 1 4   Sotheby's Institute of Art NY Track II
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Please contact the department for more information regarding the courses details. COURSE OPEN ONLY TO THIRD SEMESTER STUDENTS ATTENDING SIA NY

ARTBUS
352 1119 1 2 - 4   Sotheby's Institute of Art NY Track III
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Please contact the department for more information regarding the courses details. COURSE OPEN ONLY TO THIRD SEMESTER STUDENTS ATTENDING SIA NY

ARTBUS
353 1179 1 4   Sotheby's Institute of Art London Track I
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Please contact the department for more information regarding the courses details. COURSE OPEN ONLY TO THIRD SEMESTER STUDENTS ATTENDING SIA LONDON

ARTBUS
354 1180 1 4   Sotheby's Institute of Art London Track II
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Please contact the department for more information regarding the courses details. COURSE OPEN ONLY TO THIRD SEMESTER STUDENTS ATTENDING SIA LONDON

ARTBUS
355 1181 1 2 - 4   Sotheby's Institute of Art London Track III
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Please contact the department for more information regarding the courses details. COURSE OPEN ONLY TO THIRD SEMESTER STUDENTS ATTENDING SIA LONDON

ARTBUS
377C 1186 W 2 M1 Curatorial Practice: Exhibition Organization/Opening
TextbookTextbook
Irene Tsatsos, Alma Ruiz Mon 5:50PM -
7:40PM
TBA Online class. The course covers exhibition planning and scheduling; artist, curator, collector, and agency relations; loans; budgeting and funding; insurance, shipping, and handling; third-party contracts; catalog and collateral materials production; marketing; programming; and staffing. We will investigate a broad range of practices, policies, and protocols in museums as well as in non- profit organizations, artist-run/alternative galleries, site-specific installations, and other kinds of public interventions. ARTBUS/ARMGT 377A and 377B are mandatory prerequisites.

ARTBUS
377D 1308 W 2 M2 Curatorial Practices: Exhibition, Program, and Assessment
TextbookTextbook
Irene Tsatsos, Alma Ruiz Mon 5:50PM -
7:40PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. Part practicum, part lab, this class is a continuation of 377C and will result in a group exhibition, organized by students (under the direction of faculty), who will work collaboratively on one of several teams. Students are asked to come up with an exhibition design, education program, and marketing plan, and to develop and execute other aspects of exhibition-making and managing, with creative solutions to exhibition problems governed by different kinds of constraints, such as limited budgets, availability of key works, or visitor access. This class requires time flexibility; students should be prepared to do work between classes. ARTBUS/ARMGT 377A, 377B, and 377C are mandatory prerequisites.

ARTBUS
380A 1113 W 2 M2 Collections Management
TextbookTextbook
Rebecca M Norris Mon 3:30PM -
5:20PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. Through readings, lectures, sites visits, and hands-on practice, this course will introduce students to the fundamental principles of collection development and collection management applicable across private collections, galleries, and museums. In addition to teaching students to theorize, tailor, and adapt curatorial development policies and budgets to the needs of an evolving collection, the course will also guide students through the practical work of acquisitions, registration, and cataloguing that enable the safe and accurate storage, transportation, and exhibit of art pieces.

ARTBUS
383 1109 W1 2 M1 Economics of Strategy
TextbookTextbook
Jay Prag Iv Mon 8:30AM -
10:20AM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. Economics of Strategy uses the business-related tenets (old and new) to generate a modern, consistent, formal framework for strategic decision making. Using economic intuition we will be able to address issues ranging from outsourcing to new product lines. We will be able to explain why some firms actively compete through price changes while others in apparently similar competitive industries do not. Economic theories seem very abstract to many students because these theories usually assume many unrealistic things about people and society. Students must be mindful of the fact that these assumptions are what allow economists to answer many otherwise intractable questions. The results that we attain usually hold even without these simplifying assumptions. This class will show how some of these economic models can provide a powerful, formal framework for answering managerial questions ranging from dealing with competition to setting proper incentives for managers. Economics is a mathematical discipline with a strong intuitive component. This class uses a range of math skills from simple graphs to calculus. The instructor endeavors to refresh students whose math skills have atrophied over the years and always shows the intuition behind the math.

ARTBUS
383 1110 W2 2 M1 Economics of Strategy
TextbookTextbook
Jay Prag Iv Mon 1:10PM -
3:00PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. Economics of Strategy uses the business-related tenets (old and new) to generate a modern, consistent, formal framework for strategic decision making. Using economic intuition we will be able to address issues ranging from outsourcing to new product lines. We will be able to explain why some firms actively compete through price changes while others in apparently similar competitive industries do not. Economic theories seem very abstract to many students because these theories usually assume many unrealistic things about people and society. Students must be mindful of the fact that these assumptions are what allow economists to answer many otherwise intractable questions. The results that we attain usually hold even without these simplifying assumptions. This class will show how some of these economic models can provide a powerful, formal framework for answering managerial questions ranging from dealing with competition to setting proper incentives for managers. Economics is a mathematical discipline with a strong intuitive component. This class uses a range of math skills from simple graphs to calculus. The instructor endeavors to refresh students whose math skills have atrophied over the years and always shows the intuition behind the math.

ARTBUS
406 1442 W 2 M2 Secondary Art Markets
TextbookTextbook
Kejia Wu FriSat  -
TBA Online class. Class meets Fri 11/20 & Sat 11/21 (times TBD, see department for details). Additional online content required. The course aims to provide students with a profound understanding of the Secondary Art Market, which contributes to the majority value of the global art transaction. The course will review the fundamental economics of the Secondary Art Market, the history and mechanism of art collecting, and how the Secondary Art Market has evolved to the dominating scale today. The course will analyze the behaviors of the key stakeholders, including dealers, galleries, collectors, auction houses, art fairs and museums, in order to better understand the complexity of their roles within the marketplace. In addition, by reviewing the interaction between the Primary Art Market and the Secondary Art Market, the course will discuss the approach of expanding global art trade and how to make it more relevant to our society today.

ARTBUS
410 1337 W 0   Creative Industries Colloquium
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty, Kibum Kim, Amy Shimshon-Santo Thu 6:30PM -
8:00PM
TBA Instructors: Jonathan Neil, Kibum Kim, Amy Shimshon-Santo. Online class. Class meets 9/3, 9/17, 10/1, 10/15, 10/29, 11/12. The series of Arts and Culture Conversations give students in the Arts Management and Art Business degree programs an introduction to the artists and professionals that are shaping the landscape and discourse of the arts in Los Angeles and beyond. Taking place over seven evenings, each session is built around a specific theme or area of activity that is affecting the LA arts and cultural community. Participants speak to their own experiences in their industries and to the challenges and opportunities facing their fields, businesses, and organizations today. Students are given opportunities to engage the invited artists, leaders, and industry professionals in Q&A’s following the conversations and to network during the receptions that follow.

BOT
303A 1059 1 2   Advanced Botanical & Evolutionary Research: Intro to RSABG & CUC
TextbookTextbook
Lucinda McDade, Carrie Kiel  -
No Room Needed See department for meeting details. Class may include online and in person requirements. This course provides an introduction to the RSABG/CGU graduate program in Botany. Items to be covered in this course are: -Insight into the goals and expectations that the program and the faculty have for each student -Explanation of our philosophical approach to plant comparative biology and the curriculum that has been developed, emphasizing common themes and information reinforcement. [What do we expect you to know when you graduate?] -Session with each faculty member on his/her research interests, scientific approach to life, etc. -Laboratory skills and safety -Introduction to some of the important technical skills necessary for success in the program in Botany and a career in research. -Data management and maintenance of a database -Botanical collections: permit acquisition, note keeping, label preparation, specimen mounting, specimen handling; curatorial skills? -General aspects of field work, including preparation for the field (data acquisition (sleuthing), mapping, field equipment, etc.), in the field techniques (what to collect, how to collect-field press? silica gel? liquid nitrogen? FPA?; photographs; 4-wheel driving; etc.) -Introduction to the writing skills vital for success in the program in Botany and a career in research. -The importance of, and guidelines for, successful grant writing -The importance of, and guidelines for, successful manuscript preparation and submission. -The importance of oral presentations and in particular, PowerPoint preparation and presentation

BOT
303B 1060 1 2   Advanced Botanical & Evolutionary Research: Skills to succeed in graduate school
TextbookTextbook
Lucinda McDade, Carrie Kiel  -
No Room Needed See department for meeting details. Class may include online and in person requirements. This course provides an orientation to the important research resources available through the program in Botany and at CGU: labs, libraries, herbarium, growing facilities; resources at CGU/CUC/the 5Cs. It covers writing grant proposals for national international funding sources (e.g., U.S. National Science Foundation) and the publication process: from preparing and submitting a manuscript to dealing with the reviews and revisions of multiple scales (includes starting the process of growing a thick skin of managing reviews). This course is taught every other year.

BOT
400M 1065 1 0   Continuous Registration (MS Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Continuous Registration is the continuation course for a master's level student to complete requirements for the degree.

BOT
401 1061 1 1   Seminar Series
TextbookTextbook
Lucinda McDade Fri 4:00PM -
4:50PM
No Room Needed See department for meeting details. Class may include online and in person requirements. Students enrich their educational program by actively participating in a semester-long series of seminars presented by outstanding visiting researchers. Students are directly involved in the development of the series by inviting speakers whose research and areas of expertise parallel individual student interests. Students serve as hosts for their invited speakers, coordinating visit details with appropriate Botany program staff, students, and faculty. Students also evaluate each seminar presentation in terms of the quality of the research presented and the quality of the style of the presentation. These evaluations are discussed by all participants in several class meetings over the course of the semester.

BOT
411 1062 1 1   Special Topics in Plant Systematics: Botanical Nomenclature
TextbookTextbook
Travis Columbus  -
No Room Needed See department for meeting details. Class may include online and in person requirements. Taxonomy and nomenclature are distinct in that the former deals with the delimitation of taxa whereas the latter involves how taxa are named. Students will read and discuss the International Code of Nomenclature for Algae, Fungi, and Plants, investigate the nomenclatural history of plant groups of interest, and solve nomenclatural problems.

BOT
412 1063 1 1   Special Topics in Plant Systematics: Readings in Phylogenetics
TextbookTextbook
Travis Columbus  -
No Room Needed See department for meeting details. Class may include online and in person requirements. Review and discussion of phylogenetics based on the current literature.

BOT
413 1064 1 2   Special Topics in Biological Conservation: Rare Plant Conservation Plans
TextbookTextbook
Naomi Fraga  -
No Room Needed See department for meeting details. Class may include online and in person requirements. Students will learn to produce plant conservation plans that include assessment of known occurrences, evaluation of conservation status and needs, and advice for landowners and regulatory agencies charged with managing natural resources. Each student will choose a regionally rare California native plant and for which little or no information has yet been assembled. It is anticipated that some plans will be published in the Occasional Publications series of Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden.

BOT
499 1066 1 0   Doctoral Study (PhD Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Doctoral Study is the continuation course for a doctoral student to complete their dissertation and other requirements for the degree.

CGH
300 1013 W 4   Theoretical Foundations in Health Promotion & Education
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Mon 3:30PM -
5:20PM
TBA Instructors: Lyzette Blanco and Christopher Cappelli. Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. This course provides an opportunity for students to explore the theoretical issues and current methodologies related to understanding and influencing health behavior change in diverse populations. The course will focus on the social and behavioral determinants of health on the individual, interpersonal, community, institutional and policy levels. The course features guest appearances by representatives from community-based organizations who relate course material to current challenges in public health practice.

CGH
300C 1014 W 4   Theoretical Foundations in Health Promotion & Education
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Mon 3:30PM -
5:20PM
TBA Instructors: Lyzette Blanco and Christopher Cappelli. Online class. CGH 300c for certificate in the foundations of public health. Additional hour of online content required each week. This course provides an opportunity for students to explore the theoretical issues and current methodologies related to understanding and influencing health behavior change in diverse populations. The course will focus on the social and behavioral determinants of health on the individual, interpersonal, community, institutional and policy levels. The course features guest appearances by representatives from community-based organizations who relate course material to current challenges in public health practice. Course registration limited to students in the Certificate in Foundations of Public Health program.

CGH
301 1015 W 4   Biostatistics
TextbookTextbook
Bin Xie Mon 8:30AM -
12:20PM
TBA Online class. Scheduled time includes lecture and lab. Students are trained in the most commonly used statistical methods in clinical and experimental research. Students learn to select the most appropriate data analytic methods; how to apply these methods to actual data; and how to read and interpret computer output from commonly used statistical packages. In addition, the students learn to read, critique and interpret statistical concepts in the health science literature.

CGH
301C 1016 W 4   Biostatistics
TextbookTextbook
Bin Xie Mon 8:30AM -
12:20PM
TBA CGH 301c for the certificate in the foundations of public health. Online class. Scheduled time includes lecture and lab. Students are trained in the most commonly used statistical methods in clinical and experimental research. Students learn to select the most appropriate data analytic methods; how to apply these methods to actual data; and how to read and interpret computer output from commonly used statistical packages. In addition, the students learn to read, critique and interpret statistical concepts in the health science literature. Course registration limited to students in the Certificate in Foundations of Public Health program.

CGH
302 1017 W 4   Epidemiology
TextbookTextbook
Nicole Gatto Tue 8:30AM -
10:20AM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. This course provides an overview of the causes, distribution, and control of disease in populations. Students are provided with the skills and knowledge to investigate the epidemiology of a specific disease or other health-related phenomenon and to critically evaluate population-based research studies designed to test health-related hypotheses

CGH
302C 1018 W 4   Epidemiology
TextbookTextbook
Nicole Gatto Tue 8:30AM -
10:20AM
TBA CGH 302c for the certificate in the foundations of public health. Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. This course provides an overview of the causes, distribution, and control of disease in populations. Students are provided with the skills and knowledge to investigate the epidemiology of a specific disease or other health-related phenomenon and to critically evaluate population-based research studies designed to test health-related hypotheses. Course registration limited to students in the Certificate in Foundations of Public Health program.

CGH
306 1021 1 4   Supervised Field Training in Public Health
TextbookTextbook
Darleen Peterson  -
No Room Needed Departmental consent required. Scheduled independently with instructor. The goal of the supervised field training course is to enrich students' educational training in public health by providing an opportunity to apply theory and skills acquired from their concentration to community based research and service in a practice setting. Students contribute to an agency's resources and to the solution of public health problems while developing personal confidence and leadership as a public health professional.

CGH
307 1022 1 0 - 2   Public Health Capstone
TextbookTextbook
Jamie Felicitas-Perkins  -
No Room Needed Departmental consent required. Enrolling in a 0-unit course without concurrent registration into either a unit-earning course or Continuous Registration or Doctoral Study does not maintain student status. Students enrolled only in CGH 307 will also need t The Public Health Capstone is the culminating experience for the MPH degree. Through this experience, students must demonstrate proficiency with public health core and track specific competencies. Student portfolios can be used to determine whether program student learning competencies have been met. Working with advisement from the Program Director, students will collect evidence of work in their courses and practice opportunities that have enabled them to master program competencies. Also documented are program experiences outside the classroom, including formal employment in public health, leadership skills (i.e. professional presentations, publications, professional conference attendance, professional association membership, leadership positions, and civic engagement) and a reflection of diversity and cultural competence within their role as a practitioner. Students will also prepare a scholarly paper based on requirements for their concentration.

CGH
309 1067 W 4   Monitoring & Evaluation of Global Public Health Programs
TextbookTextbook
Eusebio Alvaro Thu 1:10PM -
3:00PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. This course introduces students to the language and theory of program evaluation to undertake their own evaluation, including how to pose evaluation research questions, data collection methodologies and appropriate methods for various evaluation objectives, and various evaluation designs.

CGH
310 1023 W 4   Foundations of Global Health: A Transdisciplinary Approach
TextbookTextbook
Paula Palmer Thu 8:10PM -
10:00PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. This course provides an interdisciplinary approach to understanding key public health challenges that transcend local and national boundaries and require collaborative solutions. Threats to the health security and well being of communities in the U.S. and abroad are extensive ranging from natural and technical disasters to environmental degradation, poverty and health disparities, and emerging and non-communicable disease. Topics that impact health outcomes, including globalization and climate change, over- and under nutrition, substance use, accidents and injuries, disasters and complex humanitarian emergencies, poor reproductive and maternal child health practices, and cultural influences will be addressed from a multi-sectoral perspective. Innovative solutions to public health problems, including use of technology, micro credit, public-private collaboration, and community and grassroots activities will be highlighted. The course will utilize interactive, participatory learning methods, including in-depth cases studies, class debates, and a field study project to provide maximum opportunity to develop problem-solving strategies for public health application.

CGH
314 1025 W 4   Emerging Chronic & Infectious Diseases Worldwide
TextbookTextbook
Nicole Gatto Thu 8:30AM -
10:20AM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. This course provides an overview of the causative factors and demographic distribution of the major chronic diseases and infectious in the world. Epidemiologic concepts, methods and research design are emphasized. Necessary tools for applying epidemiologic approaches to chronic disease prevention are provided. The course will also cover topics in microbiology, immunology, laboratory diagnosis, outbreak investigation, infectious disease diagnosis and control in populations and very basic analytic methods. It provides students with exposure to local public health department experts in various important contemporary topics such as vector control, emerging infections and bioterrorism.

CGH
317 1028 W 4   Ethics, Human Rights & Cultural Diversity
TextbookTextbook
Paula Palmer Thu 1:10PM -
3:00PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. This course explores ethical principles in the distribution of health resources, the conduct of global public health research and the implementation of public health initiatives and practices across different nations, cultures and religions, as well as differences in the concepts of right and wrong. Specific areas that are explored include the role of national and international Institutional Review Boards, research integrity, the ethics of health as a political entitlement, state obligation, or a commercial commodity, the right to health, the ethical challenges of institutionalizing world wide western concepts of informed consent procedures and confidentiality while at the same time seeking to advance scientific discovery and promote universal public health justice for the poor and disadvantaged.

CGH
349F 1036 W 4   US Health Policy
TextbookTextbook
Deborah Freund Sat 9:00AM -
5:30PM
TBA Online class. Class meets 9am-5:30pm 9/12, 9/26, 10/10, 11/07, 12/05 Do you ever wonder why despite being the wealthiest country in the world, Americans are sicker and in poorer health on average than elsewhere? Or why our health care and pharmaceutical costs are higher? Or why there are disparities in health by income, race and ethnicity? Do you wonder why legislators in California and Vermont have proposed the adoption of universal insurance through a single payor system? How about what we can do to improve the situation and what the tradeoffs are? Do you wonder what the future portends for students as they enter the workforce and must face their own health choices? This class will tackle these questions by studying our country’s health policy choices, those of other countries, and what we can do to improve health in communities and for individuals. And, we will stay up-to date with proposed changes in health policy in Washington. To understand health policy we will ensure an understanding of topics which underpin all of current policies including the socio economics determinants of health, the costs of care, paying for care, health disparities, how patients should be treated including collaboration and integration of care, access to care, our health workforce. The class will feature several very well-known and prominent guest speakers including physicians, hospital executives and others who will share their views of health policy issues and meet the members of class.

CGH
400 1032 W 4   Advanced Theoretical Foundations in Health Education & Promotion
TextbookTextbook
Kim Reynolds Mon 3:30PM -
5:20PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. This course provides detailed coverage of theories in Health Promotion Sciences and expands on the exploration and evaluation of the theories of social and behaviors influences introduced in CGH 300. The course also introduced and evaluates theories on the influence of the built environment, social and implicit cognition, self-determination theory and theories of social influence. An emphasis will be placed on the critical examination of theories, the degree to which they explain variance in human behavior, and ways in which novel theories can be developed and tested in an effort to enhance the prediction of health behavior.

CGH
400M 1031 1 0   Continuous Registration (MA Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Required for MPH students who are not taking courses, but have remaining degree requirements. Continuous Registration is the continuation course for a master's level student to complete requirements for the degree.

CGH
401B 1041 W 4   Advanced Statistical Methods II
TextbookTextbook
Bin Xie Thu 5:50PM -
9:30PM
TBA Online class. Scheduled time includes lecture and lab. This course is designed for graduate students in public health to learn structural equation modeling (SEM) analysis frequently utilized in behavioral science research. Specific techniques cover advanced topics in latent variables, path analysis, confirmatory factor analysis, single- and multiple-group structural equation models, and latent growth curve models. Prerequisite: CGH 301, 401a

CGH
402 1033 W 4   Advanced Research Methods
TextbookTextbook
Alan Stacy Tue 1:10PM -
3:00PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. This course will provide students with a theoretical and practical introduction to advanced topics in research methodology. Topics to be covered include multilevel and longitudinal experimental designs, mediation and moderation models, sampling, program development, measurement and psychometrics, analysis with missing data, recruitment and retention, effect sizes and power analysis, and preparation of a research grant proposal with an emphasis on the approach (research design) section.

CGH
403 1467 1 4   Manuscript Development
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Enrollment Contract & Registration Form for Independent Coursework required, located at https://mycampus.cgu.edu/web/registrar/forms . No registration available via student portal. This course guides students through the process of writing a manuscript for publication in a peer-reviewed scientific journal. Students learn to evaluate the existing health literature to formulate new hypotheses, conduct statistical analysis on health-related data to test the hypotheses, interpret the results, and present the theoretical and applied implications of their findings. Students gain experience in scientific writing and graphical presentation of results. The course also familiarizes students with the process of submitting manuscripts to scientific journals.

CGH
407B 1039 W 0   Advanced Integrative Practicum in Public Health (Seminars)
TextbookTextbook
Carl Johnson Wed 1:10PM -
3:00PM
TBA Online class. Department consent required. Enrolling in a 0-unit course without concurrent registration into either a unit-earning course or Continuous Registration or Doctoral Study does not maintain student status. Additional online content required. The advanced integrative practicum in public health is comprised of three incremental practice experiences engaging students in health system leadership and management and complementing the DrPH didactic curriculum. The integrative practicum begins with an introduction to the health system, continues with interactive instruction from experts in public health, and culminates in a high-level practice-based project. This course is the second in the series of experiences. Students participate in interactive seminars by key leaders in public health covering current issues and challenges not typically addressed by coursework. [2 semesters required; Pre-requisite: CGH 407A (2 semesters)]

CGH
407C 1040 1 0   Advanced Integrative Practicum in Public Health (Project)
TextbookTextbook
Jamie Felicitas-Perkins  -
No Room Needed Enrolling in a 0-unit course without concurrent registration into either a unit-earning course or Continuous Registration or Doctoral Study does not maintain student status. The advanced integrative practicum in public health is comprised of three incremental practice experiences engaging students in health system leadership and management and complementing the DrPH didactic curriculum. The integrative practicum begins with an introduction to the health system, continues with interactive instruction from experts in public health, and culminates in a high-level practice-based project. This course is the third in the series of three experiences. Through placement with an external entity, students synthesize, integrate and apply the skills, knowledge and training to develop and complete a significant project that is meaningful for the organization and to advance public health practice. [Pre-requisite: CGH 407B (1 semester)]

CGH
409 1034 W 4   Designing and Evaluating Health Behavior Interventions
TextbookTextbook
Eusebio Alvaro Thu 1:10PM -
3:00PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. This course focuses on the evaluation of health behavior interventions. Health behavior interventions are implemented with the goal of causing health behavior change. Evaluations of such programs must consider whether the program was implemented as intended, whether the program caused the change it was intended to cause, and why this did or did not occur. This class will begin with students developing an intervention designed to influence health behavior, then students will develop an evaluation plan for assessing every aspect of an intervention developed by a classmate.

CGH
414 1037 W 4   Advanced Topics in Public Health Management
TextbookTextbook
Jay Orr Tue 3:30PM -
5:20PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. This course focuses on both theoretical models, and day to day responsibilities of public health management. Principles of program management and design thinking will also be explored. It aims to better equip public health managers to lead, plan effectively, anticipate challenges, and marshal resources.

CGH
417 1038 W 4   Population Health System Engineering
TextbookTextbook
Carl Johnson Wed 1:10PM -
3:00PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. The purpose of this course is to teach the principles of systems engineering and integration for application in complex population health settings that include two or more separate and prior-existing systems including public health, community clinic (ambulatory care), hospital, and traditionally non-health organizations such as schools, NGOs, community centers, churches, etc. to bring each into concert with the other(s) for a common population health objective. This course is conducted as a workshop or clinic to produce one or more systems engineering products with students and their community counterparts working as teams.

CGH
499 1035 1 0   Doctoral Study (DrPH and PhD Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Doctoral Study is the continuation course for a doctoral student to complete their dissertation and other requirements for the degree.

CLST
316 1286 W 4   Latinx and Latin American Cultural Studies
TextbookTextbook
David Luis-Brown Tue 10:50AM -
12:40PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. See department for details. An overview of key texts in Chicano/a, Latino/a and Latin American cultural studies that have alternately built on the writings of Birmingham School of Cultural Studies scholars like Hazel Carby, Paul Gilroy, Stuart Hall, and Raymond Williams and their theoretical foundations in Marxist, post-structural and postcolonial theory (particularly Gramsci and Althusser) or have grown out of an autonomous tradition of Latin American cultural theory. Course texts may include writings by the following cultural theorists: Gloria Anzaldúa, Guillermo Bonfil Batalla, Néstor García Canclini, Aimé Cesaire, Enrique Dussel, Franz Fanon, Jean Franco, Paulo Freire, Maria Lugones, Gabriel García Márquez, José Carlos Mariátegui, Fernando Ortiz, Américo Paredes, Octavio Paz, Emma Pérez, Mary Louise Pratt, Aníbal Quijano, Nelly Richard, Josefina Saldaña-Portillo, Chela Sandoval, Diana Taylor, Catherine E. Walsh, Gareth Williams, Sylvia Wynter as well as films and literary texts. Topics may include the coloniality, postcoloniality and subaltern studies, hybridity and mestizaje, immigration, indigeneity, neoliberalism, public humanities, queer Latinx interventions, and race.

CLST
327 1327 W 4   Art as Critique
TextbookTextbook
Darrell Moore Thu 3:30PM -
5:20PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. In "What is Critique?" (1978) Michel Foucault defined critique as "the art of not being governed like that and at that cost…the art of not being governed quite so much…the will not to be governed thusly, like that, by these people, at this price." This course will explore the possibilities of Foucault’s phrase "the art of not being governed quite so much" through an examination of how art (e.g., literature, performance art, poetry, theatre, time-arts) created within the milieu of social movements from the 1960s through the present created spaces where participants could imagine how to be governed otherwise. We will examine exemplary events of art created within racial and ethnic social movements, queer activism, and protests against neoliberal culture. Our examination of particular performances and objects will be traversed by an examination of thinkers who have written about art’s relation to critique (e.g., Walter Benjamin, Herbert Marcuse, Jacques Ranciere) and art historical and curatorial texts art movements (e.g., Okwui Enwezor, Grant Kestor, Laura Marks, Fred Moten, Sarah Schulman). The primary questions of the course will be what does critical art do and how does it do what it does?

CLST
337 1246 W 4   Cultural Studies, Activism and Social Justice
TextbookTextbook
Eve Oishi Wed 3:30PM -
5:20PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. This course introduces students to some of the theoretical writings in Cultural Studies that ground the field in a commitment to social justice and social change. Readings in the course will include key writings that have influenced the field of Cultural Studies, particularly Marxist theory, as well as historical, theoretical and artistic work that covers specific social and political movements such as the prison abolition movement, labor organizing and social movements around issues of ethnic and indigenous studies, feminism, LGBT rights, and immigration.

CLST
346 1428 W 4   Durable Empires and Medias of Mass Culture
TextbookTextbook
Nadine Su-Lin Chan Tue 3:30PM -
5:20PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. This course is an introduction to the field of Cultural Studies via the theme of "durable empires and medias of mass culture." Taking a deliberately broad view of "empire" to include formations of power under colonialism, nationalism, neoliberalism, and more, we seek to understand how visible and invisible structures of power define our world through cinematic and mediated forms. In particular, we are interested in how hegemony (and resistance) articulates with medias of mass culture. How do mass media such as cinema, television, the internet, and big data represent, disseminate, intercept, and/or resist imperial formations? We will be reading foundational and contemporary texts at the intersection of cultural studies, postcolonial studies, new empire studies, environmental humanities, and cinema/media studies.

CLST
400M 1159 1 0   Continuous Registration (MA Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Continuous Registration is the continuation course for a master's level student to complete requirements for the degree.

CLST
415 1334 W 4   Ethnographic Field Research Methods in Cultural Studies
TextbookTextbook
Paul Faulstich Wed 1:10PM -
3:00PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. This course provides an introduction to a range of strategies for field research in cultural studies, including participant observation, life histories, interviewing, socio-linguistic analysis, and other qualitative methods. At the heart of the course are two concerns: the opportunity for students to immerse themselves in coming to understand particular field situations, and the broader question of how the textually-derived approaches more characteristic of cultural studies can be articulated with and enriched by such field experience.

CLST
418 1226 W 4   Digital Media Studies
TextbookTextbook
Thomas Connelly Thu 8:30AM -
10:20AM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. This course introduces students to a survey of topics and concepts pertaining to digital culture. We will explore histories, theories, and critical debates of new media; read topics on cyberspace as well as considering geographical and political questions of time and space. We will also examine how digital media are informing aesthetics of the moving-image, as well as their impact on the archive, ownership, fandom, and music.

CLST
420 1256 W 4   Franz Fanon
TextbookTextbook
Darrell Moore Mon 1:10PM -
3:00PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. In many scholarly accounts, Frantz Fanon (1925-1961) was a seminal thinker of decolonization in the 20th century. In an oeuvre brought into print in a nine-year period between 1952-1961, Fanon’s struggle to imagine and bring into language and action de-colonial thinking engaged and transformed major cultural, philosophical, political intellectual currents of his historical time and place including existentialism, Marxism, Negritude, phenomenology, and psychoanalysis. His engagements oriented toward decolonial practice transformed those intellectual currents. In this course, we will read Fanon’s collected works – plays, philosophical and political essays, newspaper articles, and lectures, to inquire into how he problematized the pressing issues of his present. In addition, we will read contemporary thinkers (e.g., Homi Bhabha, Achille Mbembe, Gayatri Spivak, Sylvia Wynter) to consider how they bring Fanon’s mode of problematization and inquiry into the 21st century.

CLST
441 1335 W 4   Museums, History and Storytelling
TextbookTextbook
Carolyn E Brucken Mon 3:30PM -
5:20PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. This course, a partnership between the Autry Museum of the American West and Claremont Graduate University, is designed as an introduction to curatorial work and an exploration of the issues, methods, and politics of museum exhibitions. The course will meet both on the Claremont campus and at the Autry Museum. Using the Autry Museum’s upcoming exhibition Investigating Griffith Park as a jumping off point, we will explore issues in the interpretation of Los Angeles history and environment, the analysis and display of artifacts, tools for engaging with visitors, museum collection practices and ethics, and, ultimately, the many ways museum staff tell stories about our past and present within the museum. Students enrolled in this class will have multiple opportunities for behind-the-scenes access, to meet with a range of Autry staff involved in creating exhibitions, and to contribute to research and interpretation of an exhibition on Griffith Park. Together we will explore what museums create and how, as well as the opportunities and constraints inherent in the process.

CLST
455 1329 W 4   Visual Research Methods
TextbookTextbook
Eve Oishi Thu 1:10PM -
3:00PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. This class will provide a theoretical and historical background for considering three scholarly traditions—from the arts, humanities, and social sciences—that research about and/or with visualization tools (cameras; digital media) and/or visual objects (art, photography, film, video, digital media). You will be asked to write about and also within visual technologies including the video essay, ethnography, documentary, and new media “storytelling.” You will be asked to consider the practical, intellectual, and disciplinary stakes of translating academic writing to other, non-traditional, visual formats. You will learn to keep an academic blog. (Research Tool)

CLST
463 1239 W 4   Genocide and the Human Rights in the Modern Era
TextbookTextbook
Joshua Goode Tue 1:10PM -
3:00PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. While not an invention of the 20th Century, genocides saw their greatest proliferation between 1915 and the present. We will begin this class with a look at the ways in which contemporary scholars have tried to categorize and understand genocide, what regimes perpetrate them and why. We will examine the wide literature that explores social, political, personal and psychological conditions that were fundamental in producing genocidal acts, and in memorializing them, or coming to terms with them. We will also examine efforts to respond to the killings. How is justice meted out? How does one punish nations and individuals? How do we configure a belief in human rights in a genocidal age? Is this belief effective in curtailing or punishing genocidal acts? Lastly, we will engage the question of the uniqueness and similarity of genocidal acts.

CLST
499 1153 1 0   Doctoral Study (PhD Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Doctoral Study is the continuation course for a doctoral student to complete their dissertation and other requirements for the degree.

ECON
309 1388 W 4   Urban Economics
TextbookTextbook
Matthew Ross Fri 9:00AM -
11:50AM
TBA Instructor: TBD. Online class. See department for details. Businesses and individuals face a critical economic decision when deciding where to locate within a city or whether to locate in a city at all. Location is a major contributor to a firm’s profit through productivity, input cost, market size, level of competition, and policy environment. Location is also a key determinant of an individual’s job opportunities, schooling, crime/safety, peers, and housing. This course will analyze the economics of cities and urban areas from an applied microeconomic perspective and survey the current economic and policy literature. This course will provide students with the theoretical and empirical foundations necessary for carrying out research in a variety of topics related to urban economics.

ECON
310 1389 W 4   Economics of Crime
TextbookTextbook
Carlywill Sloan Wed 8:10PM -
10:00PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. This is a course in the economics of crime. It will introduce the major topics studied by crime economists and to the methods that they use. At the end of the course you should have a good idea of research questions, the most relevant literature, as well as what the research frontier looks like. This should help you come up with your own research questions and equip you with the methods to answer these questions.

ECON
313 1251 W 4   Microeconomic Analysis
TextbookTextbook
Robert Klitgaard MonWed 10:50AM -
12:40PM
TBA Online class. This course presents the neoclassical theory of welfare economics, demand, cost, the firm, and competitive and monopoly price in product and factor markets under conditions of certainty in a rigorous way. Introduction to positive transaction costs economics. Emphasis is placed on the student's ability not only to understand the materials presented and to apply them to concrete problems.

ECON
316 1316 W 4   Consumer Theory and General Equilibrium
TextbookTextbook
Joshua Tasoff TueThu 10:50AM -
12:40PM
TBA Online class. A modern mathematical treatment of consumer demand, theory of the firm, markets, welfare optimization, and general equilibrium. Prerequisites: ECON 313.

ECON
318 1317 W 4   Foundations of Psychology & Economics
TextbookTextbook
Joshua Tasoff TueThu 5:50PM -
7:40PM
TBA Online class. This course presents psychological and experimental economics research demonstrating departures from perfect rationality, self-interest, and other classical assumptions of economics and explores ways that these departures can be mathematically modeled and incorporated into mainstream positive and normative economics. The course will focus on the behavioral evidence itself, especially on specific formal assumptions that capture the findings in a way that can be used by economists. Economic applications will be used for illustrative purposes, but the course will emphasize formal theory. Prereq: Ec317

ECON
320 1312 W 4   Experimental Economics
TextbookTextbook
Claudia Monica Capra Seoane Wed 3:30PM -
5:20PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. This course introduces the subject matter, methods, and results of experimental economics. The course will stress the interaction of theory and experiment, seeking to relate questions in the theory of markets, games, and decisions to issues in experimental design and the analysis and interpretation of results.

ECON
322 1315 W 2   Behavioral Economics & Institutions Seminar
TextbookTextbook
Joshua Tasoff, Claudia Monica Capra Seoane Thu 1:10PM -
3:00PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. This seminar series will feature distinguished guest speakers who present their recent research using a variety of methodologies ranging from economic theory, applied microeconomics, experimental economics and neuroeconomics, with a particular emphasis on topics that are behavioral or relate to institutions. The community is welcome to attend the seminar without any official registration. Students must get permission from the instructor to take this course for credit. Credit requires attendance and additional assignments. The course is not graded.

ECON
328 1433 W 4   Programming for Economists
TextbookTextbook
Jeffrey Borowitz Thu 5:50PM -
7:40PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. This course will focus on building skills in R and Python. We will learn how to program in each of the languages, read in data, access packages, and create functions. Furthermore, we will cover topics such as web scarping, data visualization, smart dashboards, and an introduction to machine learning. The aim of the class is to equip you with a set of powerful computational tools that will help you in pursuing research, or, industry roles. While having some programming experience before the class will be helpful, it is not required. The class will be extremely hands on and applied.

ECON
350 1314 W 4   Global Money & Finance
TextbookTextbook
Graham Bird Wed 8:30AM -
10:20AM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. Survey of international monetary and financial analysis. Topics include balance of payments and exchange rate analysis, forward exchanges, international capital flows, open economy macroeconomics, and international monetary problems.

ECON
381 1254 W 4   Probability & Statistics for Econometrics
TextbookTextbook
Pierangelo De Pace Tue 1:10PM -
3:00PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. This course covers probability and statistics. Topics include the fundamental concepts of probability theory, Bayes’ rule, notions of discrete and continuous distributions, hypothesis testing, and other necessary statistical instruments, which are widely used in almost every phase of your academic career. A firm understanding of mathematical techniques and its applications covered in this class is essential for successful graduate studies in economics. Students will be introduced to STATA applications. Prerequisites: Econ 300 or equivalent courses.

ECON
383 1311 W 4   Econometrics II
TextbookTextbook
Gregory J. Deangelo Wed 1:10PM -
3:00PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. Topics in econometrics, including large sample theory, stochastic regressors, measurement error, missing data, limited dependent variables, seemingly unrelated regressions, pooled cross-sectional and time series models, non-normal disturbances. Prerequisite: ECON 382.

ECON
450 1313 W 2   Research Workshop on International Money, Finance and Economic Policy
TextbookTextbook
Graham Bird Fri 12:20PM -
3:10PM
TBA Online class. The workshop is designed to help students who are planning to embark upon, or have already embarked upon writing a doctoral dissertation in the fields of international money and finance or international economics and development policy. It is required for all PhD students taking these fields. Students should have completed or be completing Econ 350: Global Money and Finance The workshop will discuss and analyze many leading-edge topics in international money and finance as well as in aspects of international development. The discussion will be heavily based on presentations on specific topics given by students. In addition, presentations will occasionally be given by the workshop conveners and guest speakers. There will also be 'round table' group discussions of key recent research articles. The workshop will help students learn to critique papers in an effective manner and prepare for their dissertation proposals and defenses and will also give them experience in presenting their ideas in a 'conference style' and in answering questions from an audience of their peers. It will give guidance on preparing research papers for consideration by academic journals as well as by policy makers in governmental, international and commercial organizations. Both students auditing and those taking it for credit are expected to attend regularly. Students taking the course for credit are required to prepare and present several short papers. These will often be critiques of recent literature.The workshop will normally meet every two weeks and carries a two unit credit.

ECON
499 1423 1 0   Doctoral Study (PhD Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Doctoral Study is the continuation course for a doctoral student to complete their dissertation and other requirements for the degree.

EDUC
PCU102 1282 W 1   Prof Dev: Social Justice in Teacher Education
TextbookTextbook
Danielle Centeno  -
TBA Online meetings scheduled independently with Instructor A day long training session by CGU staff and guest speakers for professional development focusing incorporating social justice into teaching practice. One PCU unit is earned for attending the full session.

EDUC
PCU115 1279 W 1 - 2   Intersegmental Training for Mentors
TextbookTextbook
Danielle Centeno  -
TBA Online meetings scheduled independently with Instructor. Professional development in coaching adult learning, inclusion, and instructional strategies for district employed supervisors, master teachers, and mentors of California P-12 schools who support candidates in teacher preparation programs. Up to 2PCUs can be earned for completing all the required modules.

EDUC
PCU116 1280 W 1 - 2   Prof Development: Supporting Novice Teachers
TextbookTextbook
Danielle Centeno  -
TBA Online meetings scheduled independently with Instructor. Professional development in supporting novice teachers for district employed supervisors, mentor teachers, and mentors of California P-12 schools who support candidates in teacher preparation programs. Up to 2PCUs can be earned for completing all the required modules.

EDUC
PCU117 1281 W 1 M1 Prof Devlp: National Board Certification Science Workshop 1
TextbookTextbook
Sheila Nguyen Sat 9:00AM -
11:50AM
TBA Online class. Class meets on Sat 10/17only. Professional development workshops on National Board Certifcation for Science components 1 and 2. Component 1 will help teachers develop content knowledge. Component 2 will help teachers differentiate instruction, record, and lesson plan. 1 PCU can be earned for attending both component 1 and 2 sessions.

EDUC
PCU120 1301 W 1 M2 Prof Dev: National Board Certification Science Workshop 2
TextbookTextbook
Sheila Nguyen Sat 9:00AM -
11:50AM
TBA Online class. Class meets on Sat 11/21 only. Professional development workshops on National Board Certification for Science components 1 and 2. Component 1 will help teachers develop content knowledge. Component 2 will help teachers differentiate instruction, record, and lesson plan. This session focused on component 2. 1 PCU can be earned for attending both component 1 and 2 sessions.

EDUC
PCUI1 1302 W 6 - 10   Clinical Induction I
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
TBA Instructor: Janette Neumann. Online meetings scheduled independently with Instructor. This class is for teachers in the first term of CGU's Induction Program. This clinical course is aligned to FACT and strives to help the novice teacher reflect upon and develop in his/her teaching acumen. In this course, candidates will learn how to incorporate critical social justice dispositions and culturally sustaining practices into their teaching.

EDUC
PCUI3 1303 W 6   Clinical Induction III
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
TBA Instructor: Janette Neumann. Online meetings scheduled independently with Instructor. This class is for teachers in the third term of CGU's Induction Program. This clinical course is aligned to FACT and strives to help the novice teacher reflect upon and develop in his/her teaching acumen. In this course, candidates will learn how to incorporate critical social justice dispositions and culturally sustaining practices into their teaching.

EDUC
303 1283 W 2   Teaching & Learning Process 2: Differentiating Content and Language for All Learners- Multiple Subj
TextbookTextbook
Samara Suafoa, . Faculty Fri 6:00PM -
7:50PM
TBA Instructors: Claudia Bermudez and Samara Suafo'a. Online class. Class meets online on select Fridays: Aug 14, Aug 21, Aug 28, Sept 11, Sept 25, Oct 9, Oct 23, Nov 6, Nov 13, Dec 4. Additional online content required. The second in a four-part series, TLP II is a course designed to prepare candidates for working within the K-12 school system; it is the academic complement to the clinical component of the Fall semester. In this class multiple subject candidates explore their own funds of knowledge as professional educators; the funds of knowledge that ELs and students with special needs bring to the classroom; and the funds of knowledge that students’ households possess. Candidates continue their ethnographic narrative project work by conducting home visits and interviewing three focus students: an English learner, a student with an IEP or 504 plan, and a student with significant life experience.  In this course, candidates will learn how to incorporate critical social justice dispositions and culturally sustaining practices into their teaching.  Our collective focus will be on developing teacher competencies and specifically on learning how to create and sustain healthy classroom ecologies that affirm all students.

EDUC
303A 1259 1 2   Internship Teaching 1. Multiple Subject
TextbookTextbook
Danielle Centeno  -
No Room Needed Clinical course. No scheduled meeting dates/times. This class is for candidates working in area schools as “interns” or “residents.”  EDUC 303A (for interns) and EDUC 303C (for residents) accompanies Teaching/Learning Process II. It is the first clinical class in a two-course series specifically designed for interns and residents. The focus is on classroom management; student engagement; strong lesson planning; establishing positive rapport; establishing positive behavior supports; and differentiated curriculum. Interns are employed as the teacher of record and are working on “internship credentials.”  They are supported on-site by a district-employed Site Support Provider.  Residents are working under the tutelage of a CGU-trained, district-employed Master Teacher.  Interns and Residents are mentored by CGU Faculty Advisors who provide on-site guidance, support, and evaluation of the candidates.  Candidates work to develop proficiency per the TPEs.  Candidates self-assess strengths and areas for growth in the TPEs by collecting artifacts and reflecting on their teaching practice. In this course, candidates will learn how to incorporate critical social justice dispositions and culturally sustaining practices into their teaching.

EDUC
303ASM 1260 1 2   Internship Teaching 1. Special Education Mild/Moderate
TextbookTextbook
Danielle Centeno  -
No Room Needed Clinical course. No scheduled meeting dates/times. This class is for candidates working in area schools as "interns" or "residents."  EDUC 303A (for interns) and EDUC 303C (for residents) accompanies Teaching/Learning Process II. It is the first clinical class in a two-course series specifically designed for interns and residents. The focus is on classroom management; development and implementation of standards-based IEPs; student engagement; strong lesson planning; establishing positive rapport; establishing positive behavior supports; and differentiated curriculum. Interns are employed as the teacher of record and are working on "internship credentials." They are supported on-site by a district-employed Site Support Provider.  Residents are working under the tutelage of a CGU-trained, district-employed Master Teacher.  Interns and Residents are mentored by CGU Faculty Advisors who provide on-site guidance, support, and evaluation of the candidates.  Candidates work to develop proficiency per the TPEs.  Candidates self-assess strengths and areas for growth in the TPEs by collecting artifacts and reflecting on their teaching practice. In this course, candidates will learn how to incorporate critical social justice dispositions and culturally sustaining practices into their teaching.

EDUC
303ASS 1261 1 2   Internship Teaching 1. Special Education Moderate/Severe
TextbookTextbook
Danielle Centeno  -
No Room Needed Clinical course. No scheduled meeting dates/times. This class is for candidates working in area schools as "interns" or "residents."  EDUC 303A (for interns) and EDUC 303C (for residents) accompanies Teaching/Learning Process II. It is the first clinical class in a two-course series specifically designed for interns and residents. The focus is on classroom management; student engagement; strong lesson planning; establishing positive rapport; establishing positive behavior supports; and differentiated curriculum. Interns are employed as the teacher of record and are working on "internship credentials."  They are supported on-site by a district-employed Site Support Provider.  Residents are working under the tutelage of a CGU-trained, district-employed Master Teacher.  Interns and Residents are mentored by CGU Faculty Advisors who provide on-site guidance, support, and evaluation of the candidates.  Candidates work to develop proficiency per the TPEs.  Candidates self-assess strengths and areas for growth in the TPEs by collecting artifacts and reflecting on their teaching practice. In this course, candidates will learn how to incorporate critical social justice dispositions and culturally sustaining practices into their teaching.

EDUC
303B 1262 1 0 - 2   Student Teaching 1. Multiple Subject
TextbookTextbook
Danielle Centeno  -
No Room Needed Clinical course. No scheduled meeting dates/times. This clinical class is designed to give students who aren't yet eligible for an "internship" or a "residency" time in a classroom in order to gain authentic context in order to understand university-based theoretical discussions.  This class allows candidates to complete assignments that necessitate access to a clinical setting. In this course, candidates will learn how to incorporate critical social justice dispositions and culturally sustaining practices into their teaching.

EDUC
303BSM 1263 1 2   Student Teaching 1. Special Education Mild/Moderate
TextbookTextbook
Danielle Centeno  -
No Room Needed Clinical course. No scheduled meeting dates/times. This clinical class is designed to give students who aren't yet eligible for an "internship" or a "residency" time in a classroom in order to gain authentic context in order to understand university-based theoretical discussions.  This class allows candidates to complete assignments that necessitate access to a clinical setting. In this course, candidates will learn how to incorporate critical social justice dispositions and culturally sustaining practices into their teaching.

EDUC
303BSS 1264 1 0 - 2   Student Teaching 1: Special Education Moderate/Severe
TextbookTextbook
Danielle Centeno  -
No Room Needed Clinical course. No scheduled meeting dates/times. This clinical class is designed to give students who aren't yet eligible for an "internship" or a "residency" time in a classroom in order to gain authentic context in order to understand university-based theoretical discussions. This class allows candidates to complete assignments that necessitate access to a clinical setting.

EDUC
303C 1265 1 2   Residency Teaching 1. Multiple Subject
TextbookTextbook
Danielle Centeno  -
No Room Needed Clinical course. No scheduled meeting dates/times. This class is for candidates working in schools as "interns" or "residents."  EDUC 303A (for interns) and EDUC 303C (for residents) accompanies Teaching/Learning Process II. It is the first clinical class in a two-course series specifically designed for interns and residents. The focus is on classroom management; student engagement; strong lesson planning; establishing positive rapport; establishing positive behavior supports; and differentiated curriculum. Interns are employed as the teacher of record and are working on "internship credentials." They are supported on-site by a district-employed Site Support Provider.  Residents are working under the tutelage of a CGU-trained, district-employed Master Teacher.  Interns and Residents are mentored by CGU Faculty Advisors who provide guidance, support, and evaluation of the candidates.  Candidates work to develop proficiency per the TPEs.  Candidates self-assess strengths and areas for growth in the TPEs by collecting artifacts and reflecting on their teaching practice. In this course, candidates will learn how to incorporate critical social justice dispositions and culturally sustaining practices into their teaching. 

EDUC
303CSM 1267 1 2   Residency Teaching 1. Special Education Mild/Moderate
TextbookTextbook
Danielle Centeno  -
No Room Needed Clinical course. No scheduled meeting dates/times. This class is for candidates working in schools as "interns" or "residents."  EDUC 303A (for interns) and EDUC 303C (for residents) accompanies Teaching/Learning Process II. It is the first clinical class in a two-course series specifically designed for interns and residents. The focus is on classroom management; development and implementation of standards-based IEPs; student engagement; strong lesson planning; establishing positive rapport; establishing positive behavior supports; and differentiated curriculum. Interns are employed as the teacher of record and are working on "internship credentials." They are supported on-site by a district-employed Site Support Provider.  Residents are working under the tutelage of a CGU-trained, district-employed Master Teacher.  Interns and Residents are mentored by CGU Faculty Advisors who provide guidance, support, and evaluation of the candidates.  Candidates work to develop proficiency per the TPEs.  Candidates self-assess strengths and areas for growth in the TPEs by collecting artifacts and reflecting on their teaching practice. In this course, candidates will learn how to incorporate critical social justice dispositions and culturally sustaining practices into their teaching.

EDUC
303CSS 1268 1 2   Residency Teaching 1. Special Education Moderate/Severe
TextbookTextbook
Danielle Centeno  -
No Room Needed Clinical course. No scheduled meeting dates/times. This class is for candidates working in schools as "interns" or "residents."  EDUC 303A (for interns) and EDUC 303C (for residents) accompanies Teaching/Learning Process II. It is the first clinical class in a two-course series specifically designed for interns and residents. The focus is on classroom management; development and implementation of standards-based IEPs; student engagement; strong lesson planning; establishing positive rapport; establishing positive behavior supports; and differentiated curriculum. Interns are employed as the teacher of record and are working on "internship credentials." They are supported on-site by a district-employed Site Support Provider.  Residents are working under the tutelage of a CGU-trained, district-employed Master Teacher.  Interns and Residents are mentored by CGU Faculty Advisors who provide guidance, support, and evaluation of the candidates.  Candidates work to develop proficiency per the TPEs.  Candidates self-assess strengths and areas for growth in the TPEs by collecting artifacts and reflecting on their teaching practice. In this course, candidates will learn how to incorporate critical social justice dispositions and culturally sustaining practices into their teaching.

EDUC
303S 1438 W 2   Teaching & Learning Process 2: Differentiating Content and Language for All Learners-SPED
TextbookTextbook
Samara Suafoa Fri 6:00PM -
7:50PM
TBA Online class. Class meets online on select Fridays: Aug 14, Aug 21, Aug 28, Sept 11, Sept 25, Oct 9, Oct 23, Nov 6, Nov 13, Dec 4. Additional online content required. The second in a four-part series, TLP II is a course designed to prepare candidates for working within the K-12 school system; it is the academic complement to the clinical component of the Fall semester. In this class education specialist candidates explore their own funds of knowledge as professional educators; the funds of knowledge that ELs and students with special needs bring to the classroom; and the funds of knowledge that students’ households possess. Candidates continue their ethnographic narrative project work by conducting home visits and interviewing three focus students: an English learner, a student with an IEP or 504 plan, and a student with significant life experience.  In this course, candidates will learn how to incorporate critical social justice dispositions and culturally sustaining practices into their teaching.  Our collective focus will be on developing teacher competencies and specifically on learning how to create and sustain healthy classroom ecologies that affirm all students.

EDUC
304 1436 W1 2   Teaching & Learning Process 2: Differentiating Content and Language for All Learners- Sngl Subject
TextbookTextbook
Rebecca S Hatkoff Fri 6:00PM -
7:50PM
TBA Class meets online on select Fridays: Aug 14, Aug 21, Aug 28, Sept 11, Sept 25, Oct 9, Oct 23, Nov 6, Nov 13, Dec 4. Additional online content required. The second in a four-part series, TLP II is a course designed to prepare candidates for working within the K-12 school system; it is the academic complement to the clinical component of the Fall semester. In this class single subject candidates explore their own funds of knowledge as professional educators; the funds of knowledge that ELs and students with special needs bring to the classroom; and the funds of knowledge that students’ households possess. Candidates continue their ethnographic narrative project work by conducting home visits and interviewing three focus students: an English learner, a student with an IEP or 504 plan, and a student with significant life experience.  In this course, candidates will learn how to incorporate critical social justice dispositions and culturally sustaining practices into their teaching.  Our collective focus will be on developing teacher competencies and specifically on learning how to create and sustain healthy classroom ecologies that affirm all students.

EDUC
304 1437 W2 2   Teaching & Learning Process 2: Differentiating Content and Language for All Learners- Sngl Subject
TextbookTextbook
Sheila Nguyen Fri 6:00PM -
7:50PM
TBA Online class. Class meets online on select Fridays: Aug 14, Aug 21, Aug 28, Sept 11, Sept 25, Oct 9, Oct 23, Nov 6, Nov 13, Dec 4. Additional online content required. The second in a four-part series, TLP II is a course designed to prepare candidates for working within the K-12 school system; it is the academic complement to the clinical component of the Fall semester. In this class single subject candidates explore their own funds of knowledge as professional educators; the funds of knowledge that ELs and students with special needs bring to the classroom; and the funds of knowledge that students’ households possess. Candidates continue their ethnographic narrative project work by conducting home visits and interviewing three focus students: an English learner, a student with an IEP or 504 plan, and a student with significant life experience.  In this course, candidates will learn how to incorporate critical social justice dispositions and culturally sustaining practices into their teaching.  Our collective focus will be on developing teacher competencies and specifically on learning how to create and sustain healthy classroom ecologies that affirm all students.

EDUC
304A 1269 1 2   Internship Teaching 1. Single Subject
TextbookTextbook
Danielle Centeno  -
No Room Needed Clinical course. No scheduled meeting dates/times. This class is for candidates working in schools as "interns" or "residents."  EDUC 304A (for interns) and EDUC 304C (for residents) accompanies Teaching/Learning Process II. It is the first clinical class in a two-course series specifically designed for interns and residents. The focus is on classroom management; student engagement; strong lesson planning; establishing a positive learning environment; and differentiated curriculum. Interns are employed as the teacher of record and are working on "internship credentials." They are supported by a district-employed Site Support Provider.  Residents are working under the tutelage of a CGU-trained, district-employed Master Teacher.  Interns and Residents are mentored by CGU Faculty Advisors who provide on-site guidance, support, and evaluation of the candidates.  Candidates work to develop proficiency per the TPEs.  Candidates self-assess strengths and areas for growth in the TPEs by collecting artifacts and reflecting on their teaching practice. In this course, candidates will learn how to incorporate critical social justice dispositions and culturally sustaining practices into their teaching.

EDUC
304B 1270 1 2   Student Teaching 1. Single Subject
TextbookTextbook
Danielle Centeno  -
No Room Needed Clinical course. No scheduled meeting dates/times. This clinical class is designed to give students who aren't yet eligible for an "internship" or a "residency" time in a classroom in order to gain authentic context in order to understand university-based theoretical discussions.  This class allows candidates to complete assignments that necessitate access to a clinical setting. In this course, candidates will learn how to incorporate critical social justice dispositions and culturally sustaining practices into their teaching.

EDUC
304C 1271 1 2   Residency Teaching 1. Single Subject
TextbookTextbook
Danielle Centeno  -
No Room Needed Clinical course. No scheduled meeting dates/times. This class is for candidates working in schools as "interns" or "residents."  EDUC 304A (for interns) and EDUC 304C (for residents) accompanies Teaching/Learning Process II. It is the first clinical class in a two-course series specifically designed for interns and residents. The focus is on classroom management; student engagement; strong lesson planning; establishing a positive learning environment; and differentiated curriculum. Interns are employed as the teacher of record and are working on "internship credentials."  They are supported on-site by a district-employed Site Support Provider.  Residents are working under the tutelage of a CGU-trained, district-employed Master Teacher. Interns and Residents are mentored by CGU Faculty Advisors who provide guidance, support, and evaluation of the candidates.  Candidates work to develop proficiency per the TPEs.  Candidates self-assess strengths and areas for growth in the TPEs by collecting artifacts and reflecting on their teaching practice. In this course, candidates will learn how to incorporate critical social justice dispositions and culturally sustaining practices into their teaching.

EDUC
305A 1272 1 2   Internship Teaching 2: Multiple Subject
TextbookTextbook
Danielle Centeno  -
No Room Needed Clinical course. No scheduled meeting dates/times. This class is for candidates working in schools as "interns" or "residents."  EDUC 305A, 306A, 305ASm, and 305ASs are for interns.  EDUC 305C, 306C, 305CSm, and 305CSs are for residents.  This is the second class in a two-course series and accompanies Teaching/Learning Process III.   Candidates must have a passing grade in the first course in order to enroll.  The focus of this course is on assessment planning and progress monitoring, meeting the needs of learners with special needs, health and wellness strategies for successful classroom environments, restorative justice strategies and working with stakeholders. Interns are employed as the teacher of record and are supported by a district-employed Site Support Provider.  Residents work with a CGU-trained, district-employed Master Teacher.  Both are mentored by CGU Faculty Advisors.  Candidates self-assess strengths and areas for growth for proficiency in the TPEs by collecting artifacts and reflecting on their teaching practice. In this course, candidates will learn how to incorporate critical social justice dispositions and culturally sustaining practices into their teaching.

EDUC
305ASS 1486 W 2   Internship Teaching 2: Special Education Mod/Severe
TextbookTextbook
Danielle Centeno  -
TBA Clinical course. No scheduled meeting dates/times. This class is for candidates working in schools as “interns” or “residents.”  EDUC 305A, 306A, 305ASm, and 305ASs are for interns.  EDUC 305C, 306C, 305CSm, and 305CSs are for residents.  This is the second class in a two-course series and accompanies Teaching/Learning Process III.   Candidates must have a passing grade in the first course in order to enroll.  The focus of this course is on assessment planning and progress monitoring, meeting the needs of learners with special needs, health and wellness strategies for successful classroom environments, restorative justice strategies and working with stakeholders. Interns are employed as the teacher of record and are supported by a district-employed Site Support Provider.  Residents work with a CGU-trained, district-employed Master Teacher.  Both are mentored by CGU Faculty Advisors.  Candidates self-assess strengths and areas for growth for proficiency in the TPEs by collecting artifacts and reflecting on their teaching practice. In this course, candidates will learn how to incorporate critical social justice dispositions and culturally sustaining practices into their teaching.

EDUC
306A 1273 1 2   Internship Teaching 2: Single Subject
TextbookTextbook
Danielle Centeno  -
No Room Needed Clinical course. No scheduled meeting dates/times. This class is for candidates working in schools as “interns” or “residents.”  EDUC 305A, 306A, 305ASm, and 305ASs are for interns.  EDUC 305C, 306C, 305CSm, and 305CSs are for residents.  This is the second class in a two-course series and accompanies Teaching/Learning Process III.   Candidates must have a passing grade in the first course in order to enroll.  The focus of this course is on assessment planning and progress monitoring, meeting the needs of learners with special needs, health and wellness strategies for successful classroom environments, restorative justice strategies and working with stakeholders. Interns are employed as the teacher of record and are supported by a district-employed Site Support Provider.  Residents work with a CGU-trained, district-employed Master Teacher.  Both are mentored by CGU Faculty Advisors.  Candidates self-assess strengths and areas for growth for proficiency in the TPEs by collecting artifacts and reflecting on their teaching practice. In this course, candidates will learn how to incorporate critical social justice dispositions and culturally sustaining practices into their teaching.

EDUC
307A 1166 W 0   Clinical Teaching 3
TextbookTextbook
Danielle Centeno  -
TBA Clinical course. No scheduled meeting dates/times. Class meetings will individually take place online. This class is for candidates working in schools to complete their Preliminary Credential. The focus of this course is to ensure candidates meet teaching proficiencies, TPEs, and to support candidates in completion of CalTPA requirements. Interns are employed as the teacher of record and are supported by a district-employed Site Support Provider. Residents work with a CGU-trained, district-employed Mentor Teacher. Both are mentored by CGU Faculty Advisors. In this course, candidates will learn how to incorporate critical social justice dispositions and culturally sustaining practices into their teaching. They will continue to develop their ability to create healthy classroom ecologies to support the needs of all learners.

EDUC
309SG1 1275 W 2   TLP Part 1. Special Education Adding General Education
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
TBA Instructor: Claudia Bermudez. Online meetings scheduled independently with Instructor This is the first course of a two course series designed for Education Specialists wanting to add a general education credential. The candidates learn how to design lesson that are purposeful, relevant, and standards based, and that have a high probability of enhancing student achievement in all subject areas in all grade levels. They apply numerous evidence-based instructional strategies within various subject areas including: reading, writing, math, social studies, science, World Languages and social skills (based on the type of credential they are going for). Candidates learn about various assessment measures and how to analyze individual and full class data to inform instruction. In this course, candidates will learn how to incorporate critical social justice dispositions and culturally sustaining practices into their teaching.

EDUC
309SG2 1276 W 2   TLP Part 2. Special Education Adding General Education
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
TBA Instructor: Claudia Bermudez. Online meetings scheduled independently with Instructor This is the second course of a two course series designed for Education Specialists wanting to add a general education credential. The course requires the teacher candidate to implement what they have learned about purposeful, relevant and standards-based lessons; research-based strategies; and differentiation to execute a lesson study that is aimed at critical literacy skills and complex output (writing and speaking). In addition, the teacher candidate will utilize various forms of assessment in order to gather data to purposefully inform next steps for teaching and learning. The readings and resources used in this course will augment the skills and experiences of Education Specialist as well as provide the necessary skills for accelerating student achievement with the new State Standards in the general education classroom. In this course, candidates will learn how to incorporate critical social justice dispositions and culturally sustaining practices into their teaching.

EDUC
309SM 1225 W 2   TLP for Special Education Moderate/Severe adding Mild/Moderate
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
TBA Instructor: TBD. Online meetings scheduled independently with Instructor This course is designed for Education Specialists with a moderate/severe credential who want to add a mild/moderate credential. It works in coordination with a clinical placement (internship or residency) in a mild/moderate classroom and provides candidates with information specific to mild/moderate competencies, including positive behavior support, assessment for mild/moderate students, planning and curricular adaptation, and communication and social networks. In this course, candidates will learn how to incorporate critical social justice dispositions and culturally sustaining practices into their teaching.

EDUC
309SS 1224 W 2   TLP for Special Education Mild/Moderate adding Moderate/Severe
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
TBA Instructor: TBD. Online meetings scheduled independently with Instructor This course is designed for Education Specialists with a moderate/moderate credential who want to add a moderate/severe credential. It works in coordination with a clinical placement (internship or residency) in a moderate/severe classroom and provides candidates with information specific to moderate/severe competencies, including positive behavior support, assessment for moderate/severe students, planning and curricular adaptation, and communication and social networks. In this course, candidates will learn how to incorporate critical social justice dispositions and culturally sustaining practices into their teaching.

EDUC
324-2 1247 W 2   Literacy & Methods 2: Multiple Subject
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Sat 9:00AM -
11:50AM
TBA Instructors: Claudia Bermudez. Online class. Class meets online on select Sat: Aug 15, Aug 22, Aug 29, Sept 12, Sept 26, Oct 10, Oct 24, Nov 7, Nov 14, Dec 5 Literacy and Methods courses are grouped by content area in order to allow candidates to explore the best strategies to deliver rigorous, student-centered instruction. These courses introduce research-based strategies, materials, and assessment practices consistent with the CA Teaching Performance Expectations and the TEP Critical Social Justice Competencies. The focus of this class is on a) intentional literacy teaching and, b) general education elementray pedagogy. Candidates will deepen their understanding of the concrete actions evidenced by “warm demanders” (Kleinfeld, 1975) including lesson planning, assessment practices, monitoring student learning, academic language instruction, Universal Design for Learning (UDL), and using resources and materials to promote higher-order thinking.

EDUC
326-2 1245 W 2   Literacy & Methods 2: English
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Sat 9:00AM -
11:50AM
TBA Instructor: Katherine Jackson. Online class. Class meets online on select Sat: Aug 15, Aug 22, Aug 29, Sept 12, Sept 26, Oct 10, Oct 24, Nov 7, Nov 14, Dec 5 Literacy and Methods courses are grouped by content area in order to allow candidates to explore the best strategies to deliver rigorous, student-centered instruction. These courses introduce research-based strategies, materials, and assessment practices consistent with the CA Teaching Performance Expectations and the TEP Critical Social Justice Competencies. The focus of this class is on a) intentional literacy teaching and, b) English pedagogy. Candidates will deepen their understanding of the concrete actions evidenced by “warm demanders” (Kleinfeld, 1975) including lesson planning, assessment practices, monitoring student learning, academic language instruction, Universal Design for Learning (UDL), and using resources and materials to promote higher-order thinking.

EDUC
338 1341 W 2   Emotional, Behavior, and Health Issues in Special Education
TextbookTextbook
Miyoko Itokazu Tue 5:50PM -
7:40PM
TBA Online class. Class meets online Tuesdays from 10/6-11/17. Additional hour of online content required each week. Candidates will learn advanced emotional and behavior methodology that supports the academic and social needs of students with disabilities that encourage social justice. Candidates will explore assessment and observation practices necessary to conduct effective functional behavior analysis (FBA) assessments as well as utilize assessment data and research-based methodology to create positive behavior support and intervention plans. Applied behavior analysis methodologies as well as the impact of environmental design and instruction of replacement behaviors will be integrated. Implementation of functional replacement behaviors as well as differential reinforcements will be emphasized. Participants will use the process of the development of positive behavior support plans to collaborate with general educators, parents, and related service providers to make data-based regarding the needs of diverse learners.

EDUC
348-2 1243 W 2   Literacy & Methods 2: Science
TextbookTextbook
Sheila Nguyen Sat 9:00AM -
11:50AM
TBA Online class. Class meets online on select Sat: Aug 15, Aug 22, Aug 29, Sept 12, Sept 26, Oct 10, Oct 24, Nov 7, Nov 14, Dec 5 Literacy and Methods courses are grouped by content area in order to allow candidates to explore the best strategies to deliver rigorous, student-centered instruction. These courses introduce research-based strategies, materials, and assessment practices consistent with the CA Teaching Performance Expectations and the TEP Critical Social Justice Competencies. The focus of this class is on a) intentional literacy teaching and, b) science pedagogy. Candidates will deepen their understanding of the concrete actions evidenced by "warm demanders" (Kleinfeld, 1975) including lesson planning, assessment practices, monitoring student learning, academic language instruction, Universal Design for Learning (UDL), and using resources and materials to promote higher-order thinking.

EDUC
349-2 1241 W 2   Literacy & Methods 2: Mathematics
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Sat 9:00AM -
11:50AM
TBA Instructor: Guillermo Lopez. Class meets online on select Sat: Aug 15, Aug 22, Aug 29, Sept 12, Sept 26, Oct 10, Oct 24, Nov 7, Nov 14, Dec 5. Additional hour of online content required each week. Literacy and Methods courses are grouped by content area in order to allow candidates to explore the best strategies to deliver rigorous, student-centered instruction. These courses introduce research-based strategies, materials, and assessment practices consistent with the CA Teaching Performance Expectations and the TEP Critical Social Justice Competencies. The focus of this class is on a) intentional literacy teaching and, b) mathematics pedagogy. Candidates will deepen their understanding of the concrete actions evidenced by "warm demanders" (Kleinfeld, 1975) including lesson planning, assessment practices, monitoring student learning, academic language instruction, Universal Design for Learning (UDL), and using resources and materials to promote higher-order thinking.

EDUC
353-2 1240 W 2   Literacy & Methods 2: Social Science
TextbookTextbook
Elizabeth Ramos Sat 9:00AM -
11:50AM
TBA Class meets online on select Sat: Aug 15, Aug 22, Aug 29, Sept 12, Sept 26, Oct 10, Oct 24, Nov 7, Nov 14, Dec 5. Additional hour of online content required each week. Literacy and Methods courses are grouped by content area in order to allow candidates to explore the best strategies to deliver rigorous, student-centered instruction. These courses introduce research-based strategies, materials, and assessment practices consistent with the CA Teaching Performance Expectations and the TEP Critical Social Justice Competencies. The focus of this class is on a) intentional literacy teaching and, b) social science pedagogy. Candidates will deepen their understanding of the concrete actions evidenced by "warm demanders" (Kleinfeld, 1975) including lesson planning, assessment practices, monitoring student learning, academic language instruction, Universal Design for Learning (UDL), and using resources and materials to promote higher-order thinking.

EDUC
357 1439 W 2   Clinical Support Seminar
TextbookTextbook
Danielle Centeno Sat 11:30AM -
12:30PM
TBA Online class. Class meets online on Sat 8/1 (11:30am-12:30pm) and on select Thurs (6pm-8pm): 8/20, 9/3, 9/17, 10/1, 10/15, 10/29, 11/19, 12/10. Class begins before start of term. This course has been designed for Resident teacher candidates who did not participate in a pre-teaching course in Phase 1 of the Teacher Education Program. Our focus will be on early teaching competencies and practical tools for application in the classroom setting. 

EDUC
358 1435 W 2   Literacy & Methods 2: Special Education
TextbookTextbook
Samara Suafoa Sat 9:00AM -
11:50AM
TBA Class meets online on select Sat: Aug 15, Aug 22, Aug 29, Sept 12, Sept 26, Oct 10, Oct 24, Nov 7, Nov 14, Dec 5. Additional hour of online content required each week. Literacy and Methods courses are grouped by content area in order to allow candidates to explore the best strategies to deliver rigorous, student-centered instruction. These courses introduce research-based strategies, materials, and assessment practices consistent with the CA Teaching Performance Expectations and the TEP Critical Social Justice Competencies. The focus of this class is on a) intentional literacy teaching and, b) K-12 special education pedagogy. Candidates will deepen their understanding of the concrete actions evidenced by “warm demanders” (Kleinfeld, 1975) including lesson planning, assessment practices, monitoring student learning, academic language instruction, Universal Design for Learning (UDL), and using resources and materials to promote higher-order thinking.

EDUC
400M 1277 1 0   Continuous Registration (MA Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Continuous Registration is the continuation course for a master's level student to complete requirements for the degree.

EDUC
410 1394 W 4   An Introduction to Community Engaged Education and Social Change
TextbookTextbook
Torie L Weiston Wed 5:50PM -
7:40PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. An introduction to the CEESC program, this course provides an overview of the program itself as well as engages students in a broad discussion of the issues with which the program is designed to address. Maintaining a focus on "bridging the divide between education and activism," this course provides students with opportunities to explore the issues impacting youth and education as well as the various solutions being offered by various stakeholders. Connecting readings, discussions and assignments with field trips and guest speakers to illuminate the critical connection between school and community, this course will provide preliminary opportunities for students to explore their CEESC Capstone projects and to make important connections to community organizations engaging in critical work.

EDUC
413 1456 W 4   Foundations of Education Policy
TextbookTextbook
Jacob Adams Mon 5:50PM -
7:40PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. This course examines challenges facing public education in the United States and the policy-driven reforms that are re-configuring the nation’s elementary and secondary schools. An introductory course in Policy and Evaluation, its goals are to enhance students’ understanding of (1) federal-state-local education policy making and implementation and (2) the relationship between “policy” and “reform” in public education, particularly whether and how policy contributes to school improvement and student performance. While students will read about the history of education reform, the major focus of the course is on the nature of K-12 problems the policy system acknowledges and the federal, state, and local initiatives designed to address them.

EDUC
418 1455 W 4   Community Engagement and America’s Future
TextbookTextbook
Jacob Adams Tue 8:10PM -
10:00PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. This course examines the challenges and opportunities citizens confront, individually and collectively, in shaping the nation’s well-being. At a time when distrust of leaders and institutions, legislative gridlock, widespread disinformation, extreme partisanship, and attacks on core American institutions hamper our collective ability to address public concerns (such as climate change, inequality, and public health), this course equips students to appraise anew the foundations of American community life and engagement. Specifically, students will examine the rights, responsibilities, and privileges that underlie community engagement, and the structural, legal, and political contexts in which they operate; assess our individual and collective experiences in contemporary public life; explore the risks and rewards of those experiences; understand ways education has before and may again prepare citizens for effective community roles; and structure educational, research, and practice agendas that move our collective interests to the forefront of civic life.

EDUC
419 1395 W 2 M1 The Undocumented Experience: Historical & Contemporary Perspectives
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Thu 5:50PM -
7:40PM
TBA Instructor: Gloria Montiel. Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. This 2-unit course is part of the Allies of Dreamers Certificate Program and is specifically designed for student affairs professionals, community leaders, and K-12 educators who want to effectively meet the needs of undocumented students (PreK-20) and their families. Students who aren’t in the Allies of Dreamers Program are welcome to take this course. It should be noted, however, that students who are taking the course as part of the Allies Certificate Program should take the class in a sequenced order: 419, 420, 421 and 422. This specific class introduces students to the critical study of U.S. immigration and citizenship by exploring the historical, political, legal, social, and cultural factors that have shaped the experiences of unauthorized immigrants.

EDUC
420 1396 W 2 M2 Higher Education Access & Professional Experiences for Undocumented Youth
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Thu 5:50PM -
7:40PM
TBA Instructor: Iliana Perez. Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. This 2-unit course is part of the Allies of Dreamers Certificate Program and is specifically designed for student affairs professionals, community leaders, and K-12 educators who want to effectively meet the needs of undocumented students (PreK-20) and their families. Students who aren’t in the Allies of Dreamers Program are welcome to take this course. It should be noted, however, that students who are taking the course as part of the Allies Certificate Program should take the class in a sequenced order: 419, 420, 421 and 422. This specific class examines seminal scholarship on higher education access and workforce transition for undocumented students, focusing on state and federal policies that have expanded this access.

EDUC
435 1450 W 4   Sociology of Education
TextbookTextbook
Guan Kung Saw Wed 8:10PM -
10:00PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. This course is an introduction to key sociological theories in studying sociocultural contexts in education, including social organization of schooling, social capital, cultural capital, and life course theories. It focuses on the effects of school, peer, family, and neighborhood on educational outcomes for diverse student groups, defined by race/ethnicity, gender identity, sexual orientation, socioeconomic status, and immigration generation, etc. Topics of this course cover the entire span of a student's academic career, from preschool to postsecondary education.

EDUC
445 1398 W 4   Introduction to Educational Evaluation, Assessment & Effectiveness
TextbookTextbook
Gwen E. Garrison Tue 5:50PM -
7:40PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. This course will introduce the concepts of educational evaluation, assessment, and effectiveness. The course begins with a foundation in program evaluation as the formal process of systematic quantitative or qualitative data collection and analysis to describe the success of educational policy, program or process. Assessment is the deliberate data collection process that supports evaluation often using metrics at regular intervals to monitor progress. Effectiveness explores the way we can determine if a policy, program, or process produces the desired result. By exploring these topics, this course provides an important foundation in educational research methods. The outcome of this course will be the ability to gauge effectiveness through a detailed plan that supports external evaluation requirements with internal assessment practices. This course is offered as a hybrid with both CGU and online meetings. This class is being designed to be hybrid with some sessions being at CGU and some sessions being held with virtual tools. It has not yet been determined what the ratio will be between traditional and online sessions. Given the online sessions, it is imperative that students have access to a working computer that has a microphone and camera and that the student has access to reliable internet service. Students can always utilize the CGU computer labs if needed.

EDUC
448 1399 W 4   Introduction to Data System Management & Governance
TextbookTextbook
Gwen E. Garrison Thu 5:50PM -
7:40PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. This course will explore the aspects to strengthen and enhance educational system data in short- and long-term topics through leading data management and governance efforts in security, compliance, data storage, and technologies. Outcome of this course will be fundamental knowledge and promising practices of data management and data stewardship. This course is offered as a hybrid with both CGU and online meetings. This class is being designed to be hybrid with some sessions being at CGU and some sessions being held with virtual tools. It has not yet been determined what the ratio will be between traditional and online sessions. Given the online sessions, it is imperative that students have access to a working computer that has a microphone and camera and that the student has access to reliable internet service. Students can always utilize the CGU computer labs if needed.

EDUC
450 1400 W 4   Practicum in Student Affairs
TextbookTextbook
Anna K Gonzalez Mon 3:30PM -
5:20PM
TBA Online class; meets online on 4 dates, to be arranged with instructor. For Education MA students in the Student Affairs and Educational Justice program only. Practicum in Student Affair provides you with an opportunity to apply what you have learned in your coursework in the authentic context of a student affairs office or related students affairs position. Students in this class are expected to work on an authentic project within their office at a college or university. The practicum placement is paired with university-based sessions where the students make sense of their practicum experiences as a collective and discuss professional expectations and norms. Central to this approach is your progress toward becoming a practitioner-scholar, a professional who can apply research and scholarship in the field to the everyday demands of a position in student affairs. Students will develop competencies around theories and conceptual frameworks; communication; access & equity; policy & law; and professional socialization.

EDUC
459 1401 W 4   Historical Foundations in Higher Education
TextbookTextbook
Linda Perkins Wed 5:50PM -
7:40PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. This course is an historical overview of American higher education from the Colonial period to the present. The founding of nine colleges by Protestant denominations for the training of white male leadership characterized the first 150 years of American higher education. The first half of the course will concentrate on these early “old time colonial colleges” and their curricula and the later proliferation of colleges that occurred in the nineteenth century. Attention shall be given to the movement from “elite” education of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries to “mass” education in the late and early nineteenth and twentieth centuries. These later time periods resulted in the growth of state universities and the founding of institutions for “special” populations of students (e.g. women, African Americans and Catholics). The second half of the course will discuss the rise and growth of the research university and its relationship to federal and private funding and the impact that this funding has had on higher education in the twentieth century. Throughout the course, attention shall be given to the history of the undergraduate curriculum for various types of institutions, the changing purposes of higher education, and the growth in hierarchical categorization of higher education.

EDUC
464 1402 W 4   College Student Development: Research, Theory, and Practice
TextbookTextbook
Dina Maramba Mon 5:50PM -
7:40PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. This seminar provides an overview of college student development theory and learning in the U.S. Attention is given to historical and emerging perspectives, relevant research, and critiques influential in understanding students in post-secondary institutions. Emphasis is placed on the integration of theory, research, and practice.

EDUC
473 1403 W 4   Introduction to Qualitative Research Methods
TextbookTextbook
Dina Maramba Tue 5:50PM -
7:40PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. The purpose of this working seminar is to become familiar with the theoretical perspectives and purposes that inform a variety of qualitative research as well as the various models and methods that can be employed. Seminar participants will examine selected works in education that have employed qualitative research and relate to their own interests. Application of the theory, models and methods will be integrated as we work as a class to help one another develop their theoretical orientation, research question, and choose the most appropriate model and methods. Participants will develop a brief qualitative research proposal during the course of the semester and develop an interview protocol and conduct, transcribe and evaluate one interview using the protocol. Participants will also hear from graduates who have used qualitative research in their own work that has been published.

EDUC
478 1404 W 4   Introduction to Quantitative Research Methods
TextbookTextbook
David Drew Mon 5:50PM -
7:40PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. This course provides a solid foundation for conducting quantitative research in education. There are no mathematical prerequisites. Taken by itself, without additional quant courses, it will provide students with the statistical literacy needed to understand much of the published research in journals. In addition, it is the prerequisite for Advanced Statistics & Data Analytics. Through my research and teaching, I have learned that many graduate students avoid statistics because they believe that this subject requires a deep knowledge of mathematics—which is false. Or they have been told that “women can’t master statistics” or that “students from poverty backgrounds lack the skills to learn statistics”—also false. I address the psychological barriers created by these false myths early in this course—and how we will remove those barriers. The course begins with definitions of some basic concepts employed in research and then covers methods for acquiring research data: how to design a questionnaire, sampling methods, and survey techniques. Next descriptive statistics are presented, especially measures of central tendency and variation. Following this, methods for assessing whether two variables are related, and how strongly they are related, are presented, including chi square, t tests, analysis of variance, and correlation. Students are introduced to SPSS, a user-friendly statistical package. The course concludes with an introduction to linear regression. Students read and discuss research articles in journals. You learn how to design your own questionnaire. More generally, this course will provide you with the basic statistical tools to conduct empirical research in education.

EDUC
484 1405 W 4   Advanced Doctoral Research
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
TBA Instructor: TBD. Online class. See department for details. This course is designed for students who have finished their coursework who need additional support or structure to complete their programs. This class can only be taken satisfactory/unsatisfactory (pass/fail).

EDUC
499 1411 1 0   Doctoral Study (PhD Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Doctoral Study is the continuation course for a doctoral student to complete their dissertation and other requirements for the degree.

EDUC
580A 1406 W 2   Proseminar for Doctoral Study
TextbookTextbook
Thomas Luschei, Guan Kung Saw Fri 4:00PM -
9:50PM
TBA Online class. Class meets on select Fridays: 9/18, 10/9, 10/23, and 11/6. Class meets 4pm-10pm, with break time. The seminar will provide an introduction to the work and thought of School of Educational Studies faculty through a series of lectures, readings and discussions. Althought designed to introduce new students to the intellectual life of SES faculty, the seminar is open to all graduate students in education. The seminar will also provide information to reinforce the basic structure of the graduate program and how to successfully complete a program doctorate. Mandatory for new students, except by permission from the student's advisor. Available for all students by credit or audit.

EDUC
580B 1407 W 2   Capstone for Doctoral Research
TextbookTextbook
David Drew Mon 8:10PM -
10:00PM
TBA Online class. Class meets on select Mondays: 9/14, 9/28, 10/12, 10/26, 11/9, 11/23, 12/7. Additional hour of online content required each week. Students may register for the waitlist only; department consent is required. This course is primarily designed to prepare doctoral students for the process of writing their research outlines and dissertation proposals. In addition, it will allow students to gain the skills necessary to critically evaluate the design of published research in their respective areas of expertise. The target audience for the course is doctoral students in the School of Educational Studies (SES) who have completed their first qualifying exam, research tools (i.e., taken qualitative, mixed, and/or quantitative methods courses), and who are at or near the proposal stage of their doctoral programs. Students will be required to work with their peers and the instructor to craft a mock dissertation proposal which will include the following sections:  (1) introduction (i.e., purpose, statement, and research questions), (2) literature review map, (3) theoretical framework, and (4) methods (i.e., sample, data collection, data analysis, and limitations). Prerequisite: Departmental approval, pending confirmation of 62 units of completed coursework (including transfer units), two filed research tools, and one approved qualifying exam. Note: This course is required for all doctoral students in SES entering in Summer 2013 or later. Although the focus will be on proposal development, it does not take the place of the doctoral advisor and dissertation committee. Students must consult with their advisor regarding the expected format and content of their dissertation proposal.  Enrollment Instructions: Students who have no holds on their account can register to the waitlist for the course via the Student Portal (myCGU). The SES Office will review the readiness (including both fulfillment of requirements and length of time in the program) of each person on the waiting list and, upon dean/instructor approval, register eligible waitlisted students on a space available basis.

EDUC
608UL 1410 W 4   Research Methods and Design for School Leaders
TextbookTextbook
Susan Paik Sat 9:00AM -
3:50PM
TBA Online class. Class meets on select Saturdays: 9/26, 10/3, 10/17, 10/31, 11/14, 11/21, 12/5 The purpose of this course is to introduce quantitative and qualitative educational research traditions, procedures, theories, and methods. Emphasis is placed on identifying methods appropriate for particular research questions and conducting disciplined inquiry regardless of method selected. Students will be expected to compare and contrast various measurement tools used in educational research and to label those tools that will be useful in their own research. Students must be enrolled in the Urban Leadership doctoral program to register for the course.

EDUC
632UL 1412 W 4   Models of Leadership
TextbookTextbook
Frances M. Gipson Fri 4:00PM -
9:50PM
TBA Online class. Class meets on select Fridays: 9/25, 10/2, 10/16, 10/30, 11/13, 11/20, 12/4 The purpose of this course is to introduce doctoral-level education students (school leaders in Urban Leadership Program) to quantitative and qualitative educational research traditions, procedures, theories, methods, and design. Emphasis is placed on identifying methods appropriate for particular research questions and conducting disciplined inquiry regardless of method selected. Students will be expected to compare and contrast various measurement tools used in educational research and to label those tools that will be useful in their own research.

EDUC
667 1408 W 4   Research and Theory on Effective Schools & Teachers
TextbookTextbook
Mary Poplin Fri 4:00PM -
9:50PM
TBA Online class. Class meets on select Fridays: 9/11, 9/25, 10/2, 10/16, 10/30, 11/13, 12/4 Participants will review the literature on school and teacher effectiveness particularly as it relates to academically vulnerable children, adolescents and young adults, as well as study the history and current status of the achievement gap by race, language and economic status. We will examine these issues from elementary school through high school and into college transitions. Each participant will take a specific issue to study more in depth and build a literature review to share with other seminar participants.

EDUC
689 1409 W 4   Education Across the Americas: Cross-national Educational Trends and Issues
TextbookTextbook
Thomas Luschei Tue 5:50PM -
7:40PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. This course draws on theory and evidence in international comparative education to explore common educational issues across the Americas, such as the education of migrant and transnational youth, the cross-national exchange of educational practices and policies, and the role of international organizations in educational change. The course begins with an overview of theory and research from the field of international comparative education, drawing on various disciplines including economics, sociology, political science, and anthropology. The course will then examine cross-national differences in educational achievement and attainment using a framework of access, equity, and quality. Finally, students will engage in case studies of several cross-national educational innovations across the Americas, including conditional cash transfer programs in Mexico and Brazil; the expansion of Colombia’s Escuela Nueva rural school program across Latin America; and the emergence of United States innovations like Teach for America in many Latin American countries.

ENGLISH
352 1249 W 4   The Jazz Aesthetic in American Literature and Culture from the Civil War to Present
TextbookTextbook
Wendy Martin Mon 3:30PM -
5:20PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. This seminar will provide an over-view of the complex origins and antecedents of jazz and its impact on American language, cultural values and practices as well as the visual arts, music and literature. This Introduction will explore the origin and rich history of the word "Jazz" which was often called "The Devil’s Music," by traditionalists; we will also trace the trajectory of the evolution of the many forms of jazz from the Field Songs, Spirituals, and Blues of the American South, and the melange of musical traditions that flowed through New Orleans and moved up the Mississippi to Chicago, Kansas City, New York and California, and it will explore traditional jazz through its many permutations including "Swing," "Bebop," "Cool," "Fusion" and Avant Garde. The question of the "Jazz Aesthetic" and its impact on American literature and culture will be discussed in detail. In short, this seminar will focus on the impact of jazz in its many forms on American Literature from Emily Dickinson to Toni Morrison and beyond. This course fulfills the American Literature before 1900 or American Literature after 1900 requirement, but not both.

ENGLISH
370 1257 W 4   Introduction to Literary Theory
TextbookTextbook
David Luis-Brown Wed 3:30PM -
5:20PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. What is literature? How does it differ from other forms of human communication? And why, finally, does it matter? These are some of the questions that literary theorists and philosophers have posed in an effort to explain how language and art, in their various forms, function. This course provides a broad overview of some of the major developments in literary theory, which may include aesthetic theory, Marxist theory, psychoanalytic approaches, structuralism, poststructuralism, film theory, textual criticism, gender studies and feminist theory, new historicism, queer theory, critical race theory, postmodernism, postcolonialism, ecocriticism, hemispheric studies and the transnational turn and world literature. Readings may vary from year to year. THIS COURSE FULFILLS THE ENGLISH REQUIREMENT FOR LITERARY THEORY.

ENGLISH
378 1294 W 4   Quest, Desire and Salvation: Unfulfilled Longings in Early Modern Texts
TextbookTextbook
Lori Ferrell Tue 10:50AM -
12:40PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. Spiritual desire and Romantic desire swiftly shade into each other in late medieval and early modern literatures. In this course, we will contemplate all the ways an author's – and a reader's – reach attempts to exceed their grasp, in matters of the heart and soul. Authors we will study will include Malory, Wyatt, Luther, Calvin, Elizabeth I, Spenser, Sidney (Mary, Countess of Pembroke), Shakespeare, Andrewes, Donne, Lanyer, Herbert, Marvell, Milton, Bunyan, Congreve, and Pope. We will also read portions of the English Language Bible, the Book of Common Prayer, and popular devotional material in the vernacular. It will cover many of the texts on the Early Modern Literature qualifying exam as well as the Reformation exam in theology.

ENGLISH
383 1242 W 4   Reading Proust
TextbookTextbook
Eric Bulson Thu 8:30AM -
10:20AM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. Ever wondered what searching for lost time feels like? Now’s your chance. A semester-long close reading of all seven volumes of Marcel Proust’s masterpiece (1913-1927) accompanied by essays from critics who have tried, many of them failed, to describe the experience. In addition to the enormous quantities of novel-reading, students will keep a weekly reading journal, take quizzes on the assigned material, write a few short essays, and pursue an ambitious critical project on the topic of their choice.

ENGLISH
400M 1163 1 0   Continuous Registration (MA Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Continuous Registration is the continuation course for a master's level student to complete requirements for the degree.

ENGLISH
436 1332 W 4   Visual Storytelling
TextbookTextbook
Eric Bulson Tue 1:10PM -
3:00PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. "Relax, it’s just lines on paper, folks." Here’s what the rebel comics artist Robert Crumb had to say about the medium when it was banned, burned, and boycotted in the 1950s. A lot has changed since then, and we are currently witnessing the golden age of graphic forms. This course is devoted to a medium that has been developing for thousands of years. We will concentrate particularly on advances within the 20th century and examine how comic strips, histoires en estampes (‘picture stories’), collage and wordless novels, manga, graphic histories, comix journalism and memoirs have been adapted to tell stories about life, love, death, and, sometimes, happiness. Included on the syllabus will be works by Rodolphe Töpffer, Hergé, Winsor McCay, Lynd Ward, Max Ernst, Keiji Nakazawa, Art Spiegelman, Alison Bechdel, Lynda Barry and Chris Ware. This course fulfills the English department’s requirement for American literature after 1900, and British literature after 1750.

ENGLISH
449 1248 W 4   The American Century: U.S. Fiction and Culture, 1900-2000
TextbookTextbook
Wendy Martin Mon 1:10PM -
3:00PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. This course is designed to provide an over-view of major 20th century novels and short stories in the historical, cultural and economic context in which they were written. We will begin with the emergence of modernism, technological developments such as the increasing use of the automobile and the first airplane flight of the Wright brothers, WW I, the enfranchisement of women, the Jazz Age, the Harlem Renaissance and Great Depression followed by WWII, the retreat to domesticity and the Cold War in the 50's, the various wars in Asia including the Korean War, the Vietnam War and Cambodia, the Civli Rights and Anti-War Movements, and the invention of the birth control pill; we will conclude with the popularization of the Internet, and increasingly globalization Some of the authors we will read will include Wharton, Dreiser, Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Faulkner, Cather, Hurston, Ellison, Mailer, McCarthy, Plath, Barth, Roth,, Bellow, Heller, Pynchon, Didion, Morrison, Kingston, Erdrich and Diaz. (FULFILLS REQUIREMENT FOR POST-1900 AMERICAN LITERATURE; ALSO EXAM FIELD PREP COURSE)

ENGLISH
499 1157 1 0   Doctoral Study (PhD Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Doctoral Study is the continuation course for a doctoral student to complete their dissertation and other requirements for the degree.

EVAL
310 1416 W 4   Theory-Driven Evaluation Science
TextbookTextbook
Stewart Donaldson Wed 5:50PM -
7:40PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. This course provides an in-depth understanding of theory-driven evaluation science, with special emphasis on the foundations of evaluation theory and practice; how to use evaluation, program, and social science theory to improve evaluation practice; how to engage diverse stakeholders in the process of developing logic models and theories of change; and how to design comprehensive, tailored, ethically defensible, and culturally responsive theory-driven evaluations.

EVAL
315 1419 W 4   Evaluation & Applied Research Methods: A Survey of Quantitative and Qualitative Approaches
TextbookTextbook
Rebecca Eddy Tue 5:50PM -
7:40PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. This survey course provides an overview of quantitative and qualitative evaluation methods, research and evaluation design, and applied social science research topics such as sampling, measurement, validity, reliability, and related threats. The course also explores specific data collection strategies, meta-evaluation, communication, and reporting findings.

EVAL
365 1420 W 4   Education Evaluation
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Mon 5:50PM -
7:40PM
TBA Instructor: TBD. Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. The course is structured to help you better understand many of the common issues and demands that are directly related to educational evaluation at different levels. The course attempts to provide an overview of various education evaluation sectors including early childhood (K-6), adolescent education, higher education, and adult learning education. For each of these sectors we will cover the evaluation approaches that can be used to answer various evaluation questions. Evaluation has the potential to improve educational outcomes among students. However, evaluators need both the strategies and skills to facilitate this improvement. How can educational outcomes be strategically and intentionally improved across diverse educational settings? What can the evaluator do to ensure students receive the maximum benefit from their learning environments? And, given the current accountability and policy environment, how can contemporary educational evaluators be successful in this diverse milieu? This course is designed to answer these questions and more.

EVAL
375 1417 W 4   Designing and Evaluating Positive Psychology Interventions
TextbookTextbook
Stewart Donaldson Thu 5:50PM -
7:40PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. This course is designed to provide students with an in-depth understanding of the science of positive psychology, and how to apply that science to designing and evaluating interventions. Special emphasis will be placed on teaching participants the foundations of positive psychological science, and how to use positive psychology theories, principles, and research to design interventions that help people reach their potential and flourish in life. The process of engaging diverse stakeholders to develop theories of change, and designing comprehensive, tailored, ethically defensible, and culturally responsive theory-driven evaluations will be the evaluation approach used to enhance health, well-being, and optimal human functioning.

EVAL
380 1418 W 4   Directed Specialization
TextbookTextbook
Tarek Azzam Tue 5:50PM -
7:40PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. This course will be custom designed to the student's specific interests. Students will work with a faculty advisor to select and participate in a series of workshops (e.g. CGU summer professional workshop series). The faculty advisor will meet with each student to help guide them in selecting a series of professional development courses that would enhance their knowledge and understanding in their area of specialization. These Professional development courses can be attended online or in-person depending on their availability and timing, students will also report back on their learning as part of the class.

FINANENG
335 1200 W 4   Corporate Finance
TextbookTextbook
Zeynep Ayca Altintig Mon 8:10PM -
10:00PM
TBA Online class. Department consent required. Class begins before start of regular term. Class meets Fri 8/28 (9am-5pm), and Mon (8:10-10pm) during the term. Additional hour of online content required each week. This course is designed to help students develop an understanding of financial decision making, including investment decisions, financing decisions, and their interaction. The course provides the students with the underlying framework of corporate finance including valuation, market efficiency, portfolio theory, agency costs, and information costs. The course will relate financial management to the structure of financial institutions in the U.S. In addition, the course includes a survey of special topics in finance including option pricing, mergers and acquisitions, hedging, and international finance.

FINANENG
340 1201 W 4   Financial Engineering Practicum
TextbookTextbook
Michael B. Imerman Mon 1:10PM -
3:00PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. This class will examine important issues and cutting-edge methodologies that are most relevant in the fields of financial engineering and quantitative risk management. The topics will be a customized blend of theoretical ideas and practical applications. These may include: the usage of machine learning and artificial intelligence to financial services and risk management, the impact of liquidity in traditional financial models, advanced credit risk models and dynamic default prediction, bond pricing (PV01 and convexity), quadratic-form VaR, implementation of the Gaussian copula, mean reversion /Ornstein-Uhlenbeck processes, and factor models.

FINANENG
400M 1202 1 0   Continuous Registration (MA Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Continuous Registration is the continuation course for a master's level student to complete requirements for the degree.

FINANENG
499 1203 1 0   Doctoral Study (PhD Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Doctoral Study is the continuation course for a doctoral student to complete their dissertation and other requirements for the degree.

HISTORY
208CM 1476 W 4   Age of Cicero
TextbookTextbook
Michael Bjornlie 2:45PM -
5:30PM
TBA Online class The life, works, and death of Cicero is in some ways iconic for the last stages of the Roman Republic. Cicero's life spanned a period of intense political, social, and intellectual change that would inevitably lead to the rise of autocratic emperors. Sometimes a participant, and always an acute observer of affairs in Rome, Cicero provides us with a remarkably detailed picture of an ancient society in evolution. This course will follow, and question the nature of, the end of the Roman Republic through a close inspection of Cicero's political speeches and court cases, letters to friends (and enemies), and moral and philosophical treatises.

HISTORY
300 1328 W 4   Introduction to Doing History & to Being an Historian
TextbookTextbook
Joshua Goode Thu 1:10PM -
3:00PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. Department consent required. L.P. Hartley's line, that the past is a foreign country, is not just a discomfort to historians; it is their founding challenge. This course examines the study of history, its formation and development as a discipline and some of the newest techniques for examining the past. As one of the few required courses in the History department, this class explores not only theories of studying the past (what we can know about the past), but also provides some hands-on experience in working with primary sources. The course is designed to introduce you to the study of history in Claremont, in the United States and in the world. It is a reading- and writing-intensive course in a discussion seminar format, with a short writing assignment and a longer analytical paper as part of the semester’s work.

HISTORY
305 1167 W 4   Modern U.S. History: A Study of Major Works
TextbookTextbook
Joanna Poblete Wed 1:10PM -
3:00PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. This readings seminar will engage with major works written about Reconstruction through the late twentieth century to provide an introduction to significant time periods, issues, and approaches for major aspects of modern United States history. This course is ideal for students from any discipline looking to develop or build their general knowledge of U.S. history from 1865 to the present, for teaching, research, and/or qualifying exam purposes.

HISTORY
307 1384 W 4   Approaches to Public History: Centering Marginalized Communities
TextbookTextbook
Romeo Guzman Wed 3:30PM -
5:20PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. This course explores major debates within public history and provides theoretical frameworks and practical skills to conceptualize and execute public history projects. As such, the class moves between theory and praxis. We will begin by exploring the relationship between the history and power, the archive and underrepresented communities, and the archive and historical narratives. From an understanding of how history works—how it is created, shared, and even experienced—we will explore how public historians have re-imagined their relationship with the public and the historical process. Lastly, students are provided the opportunity to begin to imagine and plan their own public history projects.

HISTORY
315 1336 W 4   Museums, History and Story-Telling
TextbookTextbook
Carolyn E Brucken Mon 3:30PM -
5:20PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. Seminar in Conjunction with Autry Museum. To be Held jointly on CGU campus and The Autry Museum of the American West. This course, a partnership between the Autry Museum of the American West and Claremont Graduate University, is designed as an introduction to curatorial work and an exploration of the issues, methods, and politics of museum exhibitions. The course will meet both on the Claremont campus and at the Autry Museum. Using the Autry Museum’s upcoming exhibition Investigating Griffith Park as a jumping off point, we will explore issues in the interpretation of Los Angeles history and environment, the analysis and display of artifacts, tools for engaging with visitors, museum collection practices and ethics, and, ultimately, the many ways museum staff tell stories about our past and present within the museum. Students enrolled in this class will have multiple opportunities for behind-the-scenes access, to meet with a range of Autry staff involved in creating exhibitions, and to contribute to research and interpretation of an exhibition on Griffith Park. Together we will explore what museums create and how, as well as the opportunities and constraints inherent in the process. THIS COURSE FULFILLS THE U.S. HISTORY TRACK FOR HISTORY STUDENTS, AS WELL AS THE HEMISPHERIC AND TRANSNATIONAL STUDIES CONCENTRATION, AND THE MUSEUM STUDIES CONCENTRATION.

HISTORY
322 1168 W 4   Topics in 19th century U.S. History: U.S. Expansionism
TextbookTextbook
Joanna Poblete Tue 3:30PM -
5:20PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. This readings seminar will examine both seminal and new works on U.S. expansionism in the nineteenth century. Topics explored will include manifest destiny, racialized hierarchies, imperialism, foreign relations, identity formation, borderlands, indigenous issues, and citizenship. Regions of focus will include the continental United States, Alaska, Asia, the Pacific and the Caribbean. THIS COURSE FULFILLS THE HISTORY THE AMERICAN STUDIES CONCENTRATION REQUIREMENT AND THE HEMISPHERIC AND TRANSNATIONAL STUDIES CONCENTRATION.

HISTORY
344 1300 W 4   The Paranormal in America Since 1865
TextbookTextbook
Matthew B. Bowman Thu 10:50AM -
12:40PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. This course is designed to introduce students to a few important themes and concepts in modern American history: issues of knowledge, technology, authority, religion, and race. How do Americans know what they know? What's the difference between science and psuedoscience? Between religion and science? How do the ways we imagine intellectual authority shape how we understand issues of power, politics, and race? This class will investigate these questions through an exploration of several modern paranormal phenomena: UFOs, Bigfoot, demonic possession, and perhaps a few more.

HISTORY
400M 1162 1 0   Continuous Registration (MA Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Continuous Registration is the continuation course for a master's level student to complete requirements for the degree.

HISTORY
499 1156 1 0   Doctoral Study (PhD Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Doctoral Study is the continuation course for a doctoral student to complete their dissertation and other requirements for the degree.

HRM
300 1152 W 4   Principles of HR Management
TextbookTextbook
Cynthia M Gilliland Mon 5:50PM -
7:40PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. Principles of HR Management is an introductory 4 unit course which explores internal and external issues that influence an organization's decisions and policies affecting its human resources. Critical HR functions will be explored to provide a solid understanding of the many issues confronting the HR professional. (This is a pre requisite course for students with little or no HR work experience.)

HRM
301 1430 W 2 M2 Overview of Organizational Behavior
TextbookTextbook
Stephen Gilliland Tue 5:50PM -
7:40PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. This course helps students understand the ways in which people in organizations are similar to each other and where their thoughts, feelings, and actions are impacted by individual, group or organizational dynamics. Some of the key areas covered include equity, ethics and fairness in the workplace, productive work environments, leadership and communication, decision-making and problem-solving, and power and influence in HR. Through reading and thinking about what the classical and current management theorists have to say, students will grapple with how organizations came to relate to their members the way they do today.

HRM
324 1431 W 2 M1 Global HR & Diversity
TextbookTextbook
Maria Gloria Gonzalez Morales Mon 5:50PM -
7:40PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. Global HR & Diversity covers major cultural differences in values and attitudes which may affect international HRM effectiveness, global staffing, international compensation, employee relations, labor law, and encourages students to identify the future agenda of international HRM for themselves and/or their organizations.

HRM
325 1151 W 2 M2 Compensation, Benefits & Total Rewards
TextbookTextbook
Ronald Smedley Tue 5:50PM -
7:40PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. The emphasis for this course will be on the human resource concepts strategies, philosophy, and practices of compensation and benefits administration emphasizing current models, with an examination of “trends”, cost to value, and systems. Insights from 21st century leaders in the field will be explored and discussed to enrich the learning experience. The legal aspects of compensation and benefits will also be shared and discussed from a California, federal and international perspective. Throughout the course, special attention will be given to: 1) the evolving nature of compensation and benefits in today’s recessed economy, 2) the changing expectations of employees, keying in on the Compensation and Benefits – Fall 2015 2 various work-age generations, 3) the competitive needs and challenges for employers today, and 4) the evolving trends in performance and pay realignment to the strategic objectives of the organization. The course provides each student with a hands-on, experiential opportunity to develop the human resource skills necessary to strategize, design and understand a performance-based compensation hands-on, experiential opportunity to develop the human resource skills necessary to strategize, design and understand a performance-based compensation and benefit program workable in a 21st century organization

HRM
342 1150 W 2 M1 Job Analysis, Job Design
TextbookTextbook
Dana E Mayhew Wed 5:50PM -
7:40PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. Job analysis and design present theories, empirical research, laws, and policies relating to the design of jobs, roles and responsibilities, employment practices such as recruitment, selection, and placement, developing and managing performance criteria, skill inventory planning, ergonomics and workplace safety. This course covers popular methods, practical administrative issues, and organizational relationships with relevant stakeholders.

HRM
344 1149 W 2 M2 Performance Management
TextbookTextbook
Jennifer A Jaffe Fri 7:00PM -
9:50PM
TBA Class meets Fri (7pm-9:50pm) 11/20 and 12/11, and Sat (9am-5pm) 11/21 and 12/12 Performance Management presents key principles, methods, and techniques for enhancing employee productivity and organizational effectiveness through performance problem analysis, coaching and feedback skills, performance appraisal system design and implementation, and other formal and informal performance management systems are explored.

HRM
346 1148 W 2 M1 Training & Development
TextbookTextbook
Rebecca Reichard Thu 3:30PM -
5:20PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. Training and Development focuses on methods for using training and development within the organization to create more productive organizations. This course covers needs assessments and the design and implementation of training programs to address those needs. Analysis and application of adult learning theories is explored.

HRM
347 1147 W 2 M1 Employee and Labor Relations Management
TextbookTextbook
Scott A Mazo Thu 5:50PM -
7:40PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. The focus of this course it to develop a broad knowledge of Labor Relations issues in today's workplace including history, concepts and laws. The students will gain a practical understanding of Labor Relations including union related and labor relations laws, union membership, union decertification and de-authorization, union - management relations, collective bargaining issues and processes, arbitration and contract negotiations. This course will also provide a basic education in union avoidance practices.

HRM
352 1146 W 2 M2 Analytics, Metrics and Measurement
TextbookTextbook
Annissa P Deshpande Wed 5:50PM -
7:40PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. In the knowledge economy, a company’s talent is its competitive advantage. This means that companies have to be more sophisticated than ever when it comes to attracting and retaining the skills and capabilities they require for success. A critical success factor in these dynamic environments is to apply data and analytics in a creative way to achieve goals. In this course, you will learn how you can use data, metrics, and analytics across the employee lifecycle to make proactive people decisions to drive business outcomes, create a place where people love to work, and become a trusted advisor to leadership.

INST
359C 1130 W 4   Geo-Economics, Power Struggle & Diplomacy
TextbookTextbook
Sallama Shaker Thu 1:10PM -
3:00PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. The course which is designed as a seminar will be addressing the debate raised by many scholars on the validity of the theory that "Ignoring the role of geo-economics as an effective factor in impacting foreign policy decisions can cause major crisis. The entanglement of international economic, geopolitics and strategy to protect national economic leverage and interests need to be defined in view of political decision making to measure the required tools to achieve the required political gains for countries of the world." The course will address the following questions: 1.What is Geo-economics? 2.What are the tools of Geo-economics and how effective are economic sanctions in world affairs? 3. Is Development aid more effective than sanctions? 4. What is economic assistance and how states can be influential by using their economic leverage and trade policies to impact the balance of power? 5. Using case studies of American foreign policy and Chinese initiatives and economic trade policies will elaborate address the above mentioned questions. 6. How can bilateral and multilateral diplomacy be used to change alliances in an operative calculated manner to reach the optimal national interests of countries of the world.

INST
401 1084 W 4   World Politics
TextbookTextbook
Kyungkook Kang Tue 1:10PM -
3:00PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. This core seminar is designed to provide a broad survey of competing perspectives on international relations. It will evaluate and contrast major approaches to international politics in decision making, confrontation, deterrence, and political economy. The advantages and disadvantages of various perspectives are addressed. Problems associated with studying behavior from multiple levels of analysis (e.g., individual, group, and nation-state, systemic) are stressed.

INST
410 1085 W 4   Political Economy of International Development
TextbookTextbook
Yi Feng Thu 3:30PM -
5:20PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. Is the world flat, or on fire? "Globalization" has come under fire in recent years with pundits blaming it for income and social inequality, asset bubbles, unsustainable consumption, and all manner of negative environmental externalities. This course digs deep into the theoretical and empirical research on international political economy and investigates the role of institutions on trade, the effects of trade and foreign direct investment on economic growth, as well as the institutional incentive structures of foreign exchange rate policies. We also survey the literature on the effectiveness of international sanctions and trade and the environment. An area of special emphasis is on developing an analytical framework to study the political economy of tradeable services, an area of little scholarly attention. (PP481 and 482 required prerequisite)

INST
481 1083 W 4   Statistical Methods for Social Sciences
TextbookTextbook
Zining Yang Mon 8:10PM -
10:00PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. Statistical methods and thinking are among the key languages, mental structures, and methods of the social sciences in general and Policy Analysis in particular. The purpose of this class is to help you understand that language and use those methods. In addition, the purpose of this class is to prepare you for further study in more advanced statistical research methods such as multivariate regression analysis. This class is a basic introduction to statistics. For this class the only math background you require is algebra. An introduction to probability is useful. You are expected to write at the graduate level. This course is a prerequisite for PP482, PP488 and PP487.

INST
487 1058 W 4   Advanced Topics in Applied Econometrics
TextbookTextbook
Mark Abdollahian Mon 8:10PM -
10:00PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. This class is required for interfield students who choose the PP methods sequence and for SPE students who want to further develop their empirical skills to the necessary level required for high quality academic research as well as private/public sector employment using empirics. The course applies the methods techniques learned in previous courses, a review of ordinary least squares (OLS) assumptions and violations, to introduce you to best practices data management and analysis techniques. Maximum likelihood estimation and logit/probit analysis are covered as well as simultaneous equation modeling. Methods techniques are expanded to embrace time series, panel data, and spatial analysis including geographical information systems (GIS). SPE students who have taken the Econometrics sequence will find additional methodological techniques as well as an opportunity to use the course format to work on a single research project during the semester. In addition, the class is designed to assist in research proposal writing for all students. Many students have used their final project for this course as a significant basis of the dissertation research.

ISP
201 1210 W 0 M1 Foundations in Graduate Academic Discourse Reading & Writing
TextbookTextbook
Sheriann Simpson MonWed 7:00PM -
9:50PM
TBA Online class. Students are placed into ISP, however, any international student may register. Additional online content required each week. This course is exclusively for students in the International Scholars Program. This course will help students develop and use their English skills to communicate effectively in academic settings. Students will learn strategies for using the specialized vocabularies of their fields. They will also learn to collect, organize, and evaluate information for writing purposes, while writing a range of texts appropriate to purpose, audience, register, and tone. They will also learn to critically read academic texts, and to listen to lectures and take notes effectively.

ISP
202 1208 W 0 M1 Foundations in Graduate Research I
TextbookTextbook
Sheriann Simpson TueThu 7:00PM -
9:50PM
TBA Online class. Students are placed into ISP, however, any international student may register. Additional hour of online content required each week. This course is exclusively for students in the International Scholars Program. This course will allow students to demonstrate an understanding of a range of research skills that will assist them in conducting both scientific and social scientific research. Students will learn to describe the basic tenets of effective research; to distinguish between the major types of research and their specific aims in their fields; to explain the major paradigms that form the basis of academic inquiry; and to understand the role of theory in the research process.

ISP
203 1207 W 0 M1 Foundations in Graduate Learning Strategies
TextbookTextbook
Sheriann Simpson MonWed 7:00PM -
9:50PM
TBA Online class. Students are placed into ISP, however, any international student may register. Additional online content required each week. This course is exclusively for students in the International Scholars Program. This course will help students to develop and apply group work skills, independent learning skills, and critical thinking skills in their graduate study. This course will explore study skills and strategies that promote effective and independent learning, while attending to topics like the American graduate education culture and work environment, information literacy, the rationale and practice of group work, and the use of critical and analytical thinking skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing.

ISP
204 1171 W 0 M2 Foundations in Graduate Presentation
TextbookTextbook
Sheriann Simpson Fri 7:00PM -
9:50PM
TBA Online class. Students are placed into ISP, however, any international student may register. Additional online content required each week. This course in exclusively for students in the International Scholars Program. This course will teach students to use technology effectively to support verbal and written presentations. Students will learn to use computer software to enhance written documents and to create professional presentations. They will also learn how to effectively plan and deliver oral presentations based on written documents.

ISP
205 1209 W 0 M1 Foundations in Graduate Academic Discourse Listening & Speaking
TextbookTextbook
Sheriann Simpson TueThu 7:00PM -
9:50PM
TBA Online class. Students are placed into ISP, however, any international student may register. Additional online content required each week. This course is exclusively for students in the International Scholars Program. This course will help students develop and use English to communicate effectively in academic settings. Students will learn strategies for using the specialized vocabularies of their fields. They will also learn to collect, organize, and evaluate information for writing purposes, while producing a range of texts appropriate to purpose, audience, register, and tone. They will also learn to critically read academic texts, and to listen to lectures and take notes effectively. Although it is an integrated skills course, 201.B particularly emphasizes academic listening/speaking and the development of aural/oral literacy.

ISP
251 1206 W 0 M2 Foundations in Graduate Discourse II - Reading and Writing
TextbookTextbook
Sheriann Simpson MonWed 7:00PM -
9:50PM
TBA Online class. Students are placed into ISP, however, any international student may register. Additional online content required each week. This course in exclusively for students in the International Scholars Program. This course will help students to acquire a level of English language proficiency sufficient to participate effectively in graduate classes and to utilize those skills for higher-level conceptual learning. Students will learn to recognize and assess authority and evidence in academic texts; to apply critical and analytical reasoning skills to assess the logic, validity, and truth of arguments; and to present and defend academic arguments in a seminar format. Students will write a range of texts, appropriate to purpose, audience, register, and tone, and will read and analyze a case study.

ISP
252 1172 W 0 M2 Foundations in Graduate Research Methods II
TextbookTextbook
Sheriann Simpson MonWed 7:00PM -
9:50PM
TBA Online class. Students are placed into ISP, however, any international student may register. Additional online content required each week. This course is exclusively for students in the International Scholars Program. This course will prepare students to design a research project from a quantitative, qualitative, or critical theory perspective, and to critically interpret data collected, with a view to drawing a conclusion about a hypothesis. Students will learn to identify major issues in research design, including measurement, sampling, validity, and reliability; to understand fundamental concepts behind statistical analysis; to interpret data consistently according to a particlar paradigm; and to apply rigorous statistical methods in the analysis of data. They will do this through the development of an individual research project about a question or problem relevant to their field of study.

ISP
255 1173 W 0 M2 Foundations in Graduate Discourse II - Listening and Speaking
TextbookTextbook
Sheriann Simpson TueThu 7:00PM -
9:50PM
TBA Online class. Students are placed into ISP, however, any international student may register. Additional online content required each week. This course in exclusively for students in the International Scholars Program. This course will help students to acquire a level of English language proficiency sufficient to participate effectively in graduate classes and to utilize those skills for higher-level conceptual learning. Students will learn to recognize and assess authority and evidence in academic texts; to apply critical and analytical reasoning skills to assess the logic, validity, and truth of arguments; and to present and defend academic arguments in a seminar format. Students will write a range of texts, appropriate to purpose, audience, register, and tone, and will read and analyze a case study. Although it is an integrated skills course, 251.B particularly emphasizes academic listening/speaking and the development of aural/oral literacy.

IST
302 1319 W 4   Databases
TextbookTextbook
Nagla S Alnosayan Mon 3:30PM -
5:20PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. This course is intended for students to gain a deep understanding of the important concepts and techniques of physical relational database design and a fundamental understanding of the architecture of modern database management systems.

IST
302 1487 W2 4   Databases
TextbookTextbook
Nagla S Alnosayan Tue 5:50PM -
7:40PM
TBA IST Student only and SQL prerequisites. Department consent required. Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. This course is intended for students to gain a deep understanding of the important concepts and techniques of physical relational database design and a fundamental understanding of the architecture of modern database management systems.

IST
303 1320 W 4   Software Development
TextbookTextbook
Wallace Chipidza Tue 5:50PM -
7:40PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. This class is an introduction to software development using agile methods. Students use a combination of Python 3 and related tools to develop software. The class is practically oriented, with hands-on exercises occupying substantial chunks of class time.

IST
304 1321 W 4   Communications & Networking
TextbookTextbook
Chinazunwa C. Uwaoma Tue 3:30PM -
5:20PM
TBA Online class. IST students only. Additional hour of online content required each week. This is a graduate level course covering TCP/IP Internet communication protocol design, emerging wireless data networking and networked applications. The Internet has become your business e-infrastructure. The success of the Internet and web-based services is bringing new ways of doing business in a global world and is constantly pushing the frontier with several exciting next generation networking technologies and applications. These calls for increased demand on business managers to better understand the networks they manage and Information System professionals to design, implement and operate these advanced networks to provide efficient and reliable services to their users.

IST
320 1342 W 4   Design Methods and Tools
TextbookTextbook
Nagla S Alnosayan Thu 5:50PM -
7:40PM
TBA Online class. CISAT Online Students Only. See department for registration permission number. Additional hour of online content required each week. This class is an introduction to the methods and tools used in optimizing design choices for the benefit of the user’s experience on digital and non-digital platforms. Students learn a variety of techniques that are integral in completing design projects including but not limited to: requirements gathering, design approaches, research methods, prototyping, and evaluation.

IST
321 1344 W 4   Leading Digital Business Transformation
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Wed 5:50PM -
7:40PM
TBA Instructor: Felipe Negritto. Online class. CISAT Online Students Only. See department for registration permission number. Additional hour of online content required each week. Successfully incorporating today’s digital technologies enable companies to operate in new ways. The purpose of the course is to amplify students to lead IT-enabled business model transformation in modern organizations. The course position students at the high-point of the IT leadership activity, where goals and priorities to redefine business models are being set. During the course students will experiment a complete digital transformation process, develop digital capabilities and generate value-creation business opportunities.

IST
330 1296 1 1 - 4   Supervised Professional Practice in IS&T
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed CISAT Online Students Only. See department for registration permission number The goal of the supervised professional practice course is to enrich students' educational training in information systems and technology fields by providing an opportunity to apply theory and skills acquired from their classes to a professional setting. Students contribute to an organization or company’s resources and to specific projects while developing personal confidence and leadership as an IS&T professional.

IST
343 1322 W 4   Data Science Practicum
TextbookTextbook
Yan Li Fri 12:20PM -
3:10PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. In this course, we provide a team-based learning experience for students to apply important concepts, models, processes, and techniques of analytics for modern organizations. The students will work on real-world data science problems with industry sponsors.

IST
344 1343 W 4   Data Analytics and Information Visualization
TextbookTextbook
Lorne Olfman Tue 5:50PM -
7:40PM
TBA Online class. CISAT Online Students Only. See department for registration permission number. Additional hour of online content required each week. The purpose of this course is to provide students with the opportunity for gaining a deep understanding of the important principles and techniques for translating organizational data into visual stories that can be used by managers to make data-driven decisions. It also provides students with the opportunity to gain practical experience in building a business intelligence application that starts from business requirements elicitation, to data preparation, to visual presentation. Main topics of this course include basic concepts of information visualization, best practices for data extraction, transformation, and loading process, fundamentals of data preparation and understanding, principles of dashboard design, and an overview of predictive analytics.

IST
344 1488 W2 4   Data Analytics and Information Visualization
TextbookTextbook
Lorne Olfman Mon 5:50PM -
7:40PM
TBA Online IST Students Only. Department consent required. Additional hour of online content required each week. The purpose of this course is to provide students with the opportunity for gaining a deep understanding of the important principles and techniques for translating organizational data into visual stories that can be used by managers to make data-driven decisions. It also provides students with the opportunity to gain practical experience in building a business intelligence application that starts from business requirements elicitation, to data preparation, to visual presentation. Main topics of this course include basic concepts of information visualization, best practices for data extraction, transformation, and loading process, fundamentals of data preparation and understanding, principles of dashboard design, and an overview of predictive analytics.

IST
346 1323 W 4   Data warehouse design and implementation for business intelligence
TextbookTextbook
Yan Li Wed 5:50PM -
7:40PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. In this course, we explore important concepts and techniques in the design and implementation of data warehouses (DW) for business intelligence. We will examine: the DW architecture and development process including logical and physical design issues, technical factors (e.g. hardware, Data Warehouse and Database Management Systems technologies), and implementation considerations (e.g. data extraction, transformation and loading tools). We will also introduce On-Line Analytical Processing (OLAP) to create dashboards and visualization.

IST
351 1454 W 4   Cyber Security Risk Management
TextbookTextbook
Steven Andres Sat 10:00AM -
12:50PM
TBA Online class The course raises the strategic relevance of the evolving threat landscape and offers students a fresh perspective of how to take the threat seriously, foster preparedness and apply a broader approach to get ahead of threats.

IST
360 1324 W 4   Internet of Things: Introduction
TextbookTextbook
Chinazunwa C. Uwaoma Thu 5:50PM -
7:40PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. This is the first of a three-course sequence on the "Internet of Things" (IoT). IoT can be described as a widely distributed, intelligent network of smart devices that enables the enhancement, as well as the extension to fundamental services in different sectors such as education, health, and energy. The course will cover the following topics: • The Evolution and Emergence of IoT (From Communication/Computational Perspectives) • Importance of IoT in the Society - The Benefits and Concerns (ethical issues: privacy, security, and usability). • IoT Key Components and Devices • Network Technology for IoT • Pervasive Computing and Context Awareness for IoT • IoT System Design/Modeling (Group work) Along with two additional courses that are planned to be offered in future semesters, this sequence will essentially cover the design and development of products and services that include devices for sensing, actuation, processing, and communication. Background Preparation Basic knowledge of computing, and familiarity with at least any of these programming languages: C, C++, java, and python.

IST
370 1325 W 4   Introduction to GIS Analytics and Solution Development
TextbookTextbook
Brian Hilton Wed 5:50PM -
7:40PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. This course provides an overview of the theoretical foundations and the applied use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS).

IST
373 1326 W 4   GIS Practicum
TextbookTextbook
Brian Hilton Fri 12:20PM -
3:10PM
TBA Online class. See department for meeting details. Department consent required. This course provides students with an opportunity to design, develop, and implement a GIS-based solution in response to an industry/organization defined problem.

IST
380 1299 W 4   Introduction to Health Informatics
TextbookTextbook
Samir Chatterjee Tue 3:30PM -
5:20PM
TBA Online class. IST and CGH students only. Additional hour of online content required each week. This course will approach the related fields of Medical Informatics, Bioinformatics, and Information Science through an examination of foundations, applications, and case studies that reach across arbitrary disciplinary boundaries to explore the intersections and synergies among them.

IST
400M 1287 1 0   Continuous Registration (MA Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Continuous Registration is the continuation course for a master's level student to complete requirements for the degree.

IST
499 1285 1 0   Doctoral Study (PhD Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Doctoral Study is the continuation course for a doctoral student to complete their dissertation and other requirements for the degree. During the semester students will generally work on: * Research methodology study and deployment * Experiment Design * Questionnaires Design * Experiment system development * Data collection and analysis

IST
501A 1298 W 4   Introduction to IS&T Research
TextbookTextbook
Terry Ryan Mon 3:30PM -
5:20PM
TBA Online class. IST PhD students only. Additional hour of online content required each week. Introduces new doctoral students to the nature of doctoral studies. Introduces the student to conceptual foundations for information science research past and current research areas and researchers in the discipline. The student learns about writing the doctoral dissertation and develops a preliminary research topic analysis.

IST
504 1379 W 4   Quantitative Research Methods
TextbookTextbook
Terry Ryan Mon 5:50PM -
7:40PM
TBA Online class. IST PhD students only. Additional hour of online content required each week. This course introduces doctoral students to many of the quantitative techniques employed by IS&T researchers. It does not cover all of the advanced methods that can be found in the IS&T research literature, but it does introduce many of the most commonly used ones. Additionally, the course introduces students to R, a highly popular, free programming language that supports statistical analysis and data mining.

IST
505 1297 W 4   Design Research: Seminar
TextbookTextbook
Samir Chatterjee Thu 5:50PM -
7:40PM
TBA Online class. IST PhD students only. Additional hour of online content required each week. The course develops skills for implementing and evaluating the techniques and methods that are used in the various phases of design research. After an exposure to the characteristics that differentiate design research from other types of research, research methods and techniques used in the various phases of such research will be discussed in the context of exemplars of such research. The exemplars will be from a number of information systems areas such as software engineering, networking, Internet technologies, information security, telemedicine, middleware, multimedia and others.

MATH
231CM 1043 1 4   Math Analysis I
TextbookTextbook
Asuman Aksoy MonWed 9:35AM -
10:50AM
No Room Needed CMC class. Instructor consent and CGU Registration Form-Claremont Colleges Courses required, located at https://mycampus.cgu.edu/web/registrar/forms Countable sets, least upper bounds, and metric space topology including compactness, completeness, connectivity, and uniform convergence. Related topics as time permits.

MATH
231HM 1086 1 4   Mathematical Analysis I
TextbookTextbook
Heather Brooks MonWed 1:15PM -
2:30PM
No Room Needed HMC class. Instructor consent and CGU Registration Form-Claremont Colleges Courses required, located at https://mycampus.cgu.edu/web/registrar/forms Countable sets, least upper bounds, and metric space topology including compactness, completeness, connectivity, and uniform convergence. Related topics as time permits.

MATH
231SC 1092 1 4   Principles of Real Analysis I
TextbookTextbook
Winston Ou TueThu 2:45PM -
4:00PM
No Room Needed Scripps class. Instructor consent and CGU Registration Form-Claremont Colleges Courses required, located at https://mycampus.cgu.edu/web/registrar/forms This course is the first half of a rigorous discussion of the main concepts (convergence, continuity, differentiation, and integration) of analysis. It begins with basic topology (openness, compactness, completeness, etc.) in metric spaces and a precise treatment of numerical sequences and series and closes with uniform convergence and the great theorems of Ascoli-Arzela and Stone-Weierstrass.

MATH
235CM 1045 1 4   Complex Analysis
TextbookTextbook
Michael O'Neill MonWed 9:35AM -
10:50AM
No Room Needed CMC class. Instructor consent and CGU Registration Form-Claremont Colleges Courses required, located at https://mycampus.cgu.edu/web/registrar/forms An introduction to the theory and application of analytic functions of a complex variable. Prerequisite: Mathematics 60, or permission of the instructor. Offered jointly by CMC and Pomona.

MATH
251CM 1044 1 4   Probability
TextbookTextbook
Mark Huber MonWedFri 9:00AM -
9:50AM
No Room Needed CMC class. Instructor consent and CGU Registration Form-Claremont Colleges Courses required, located at https://mycampus.cgu.edu/web/registrar/forms The main elements of probability theory at an intermediate level. Topics include combinatorial analysis, conditional probabilities, discrete and continuous random variables, probability distributions, central limit theorem, and numerous applications. Students may not receive credit for both Math 251 and Math 257.

MATH
252 1008 W 4   Statistical Theory
TextbookTextbook
Yujia Ding Fri 7:00PM -
9:50PM
TBA Online class This course will cover in depth the mathematics behind most of the frequently used statistical tools such as point and interval estimation, hypothesis testing, goodness of fit, ANOVA, linear regression. This is a theoretical course, but we will also be using R statistical package to gain some hands on experience with data.

MATH
252PO 1053 1 4   Statistical Theory
TextbookTextbook
Johanna Hardin TueThu 1:15PM -
2:30PM
No Room Needed Pomona class. Instructor consent and CGU Registration Form-Claremont Colleges Courses required, located at https://mycampus.cgu.edu/web/registrar/forms This course will cover in depth the mathematics behind most of the frequently used statistical tools such as point and interval estimation, hypothesis testing, goodness of fit, ANOVA, linear regression. This is a theoretical course, but we will also be using R statistical package to gain some hands on experience with data

MATH
254PO 1052 1 4   Computational Statistics
TextbookTextbook
Gabriel Chandler TueThu 1:15PM -
2:30PM
No Room Needed Pomona class. Instructor consent and CGU Registration Form-Claremont Colleges Courses required, located at https://mycampus.cgu.edu/web/registrar/forms An introduction to computationally intensive statistical techniques. Topics may include: random variable generation, Markov Chain Monte Carlo, tree based methods (CART, random forests), kernel based techniques (support vector machines), optimization, other classification, clustering & network analysis, the bootstrap, dimension reduction techniques, LASSO, and the analysis of large data sets. Theory and applications are both highlighted. Algorithms will be implemented using statistical software.

MATH
257HM 1087 1 2 M1 Intermediate Probability
TextbookTextbook
Arthur Benjamin MonWed 9:35AM -
10:50AM
No Room Needed HMC class. Instructor consent and CGU Registration Form-Claremont Colleges Courses required, located at https://mycampus.cgu.edu/web/registrar/forms Continuous random variables, distribution functions, joint density functions, marginal and conditional distributions, functions of random variables, conditional expectation, covariance and correlation, moment generating functions, law of large numbers, Chebyshev's theorem and central limit theorem. Students may not receive credit for both Math 251 and Math 257.

MATH
265HM 1088 1 4   Numerical Analysis
TextbookTextbook
Nicholas Pippenger TueThu 9:35AM -
10:50AM
No Room Needed HMC class. Instructor consent and CGU Registration Form-Claremont Colleges Courses required, located at https://mycampus.cgu.edu/web/registrar/forms An introduction to the theory and methods for numerical solution of mathematical problems. Core topics include: analysis of error and efficiency of methods; solutions of linear systems by Gaussian elimination and iterative methods; calculation of eigenvalue and eigenvectors; interpolation and approximation; numerical integration; solution of ordinary differential equations.

MATH
271CM 1046 1 4   Abstract Algebra I
TextbookTextbook
Robert Valenza MonWedFri 9:00AM -
9:50AM
No Room Needed CMC class. Instructor consent and CGU Registration Form-Claremont Colleges Courses required, located at https://mycampus.cgu.edu/web/registrar/forms Groups, rings, fields and additional topics. Topics in group theory include groups, subgroups, quotient groups, Lagrange's theorem, symmetry groups, and the isomorphism theorems. Topics in Ring theory include Euclidean domains, PIDs, UFDs, fields, polynomial rings, ideal theory, and the isomorphism theorems. In recent years, additional topics have included the Sylow theorems, group actions, modules, representations, and introductory category theory

MATH
271HM 1089 1 4   Abstract Algebra I
TextbookTextbook
Michael Orrison TueThu 1:15PM -
2:30PM
No Room Needed HMC class. Instructor consent and CGU Registration Form-Claremont Colleges Courses required, located at https://mycampus.cgu.edu/web/registrar/forms Groups, rings, fields and additional topics. Topics in group theory include groups, subgroups, quotient groups, Lagrange's theorem, symmetry groups, and the isomorphism theorems. Topics in Ring theory include Euclidean domains, PIDs, UFDs, fields, polynomial rings, ideal theory, and the isomorphism theorems. In recent years, additional topics have included the Sylow theorems, group actions, modules, representations, and introductory category theory.

MATH
271HM 1090 2 4   Abstract Algebra I
TextbookTextbook
Michael Orrison TueThu 2:45PM -
4:00PM
No Room Needed HMC class. Instructor consent and CGU Registration Form-Claremont Colleges Courses required, located at https://mycampus.cgu.edu/web/registrar/forms Groups, rings, fields and additional topics. Topics in group theory include groups, subgroups, quotient groups, Lagrange's theorem, symmetry groups, and the isomorphism theorems. Topics in Ring theory include Euclidean domains, PIDs, UFDs, fields, polynomial rings, ideal theory, and the isomorphism theorems. In recent years, additional topics have included the Sylow theorems, group actions, modules, representations, and introductory category theory.

MATH
274PO 1054 1 4   Abstract Algebra II: Representation Theory
TextbookTextbook
Gizem Karaali TueThu 2:45PM -
4:00PM
No Room Needed Pomona class. Instructor consent and CGU Registration Form-Claremont Colleges Courses required, located at https://mycampus.cgu.edu/web/registrar/forms Topics covered will include group rings, characters, orthogonality relations, induced representations, application of representation theory, and other select topics from module theory. Prerequisite: Math 271. This course is independent of Math 272 (Abstract Algebra II: Galois Theory), and students may receive credit for both courses.

MATH
280HM 1091 1 4   Introduction to Partial Differential Equations
TextbookTextbook
Andrew Bernoff MonWed 1:15PM -
2:30PM
No Room Needed HMC class. Instructor consent and CGU Registration Form-Claremont Colleges Courses required, located at https://mycampus.cgu.edu/web/registrar/forms Classifying PDEs, the method of characteristics, the heat equation, wave equation, and Laplace's equation, separation of variables, Fourier series and other orthogonal expansions, convergence of orthogonal expansions, well-posed problems, existence and uniqueness of solutions, maximum principles and energy methods, Sturm-Liouville theory, Fourier transform methods and Green's functions, Bessel functions. Prerequisites: Differential equations course and Math 231, or permission of instructor.

MATH
287HM 1094 1 4   Operations Research
TextbookTextbook
Mohamed Omar TueThu 2:45PM -
4:00PM
No Room Needed HMC class. Instructor consent and CGU Registration Form-Claremont Colleges Courses required, located at https://mycampus.cgu.edu/web/registrar/forms Linear, integer, non-linear and dynamic programming, classical optimization problems, and network theory.

MATH
289ACM 1047 1 4   Special Topics in Mathematics: Image Processing
TextbookTextbook
Chiu-Yen Kao MonWed 11:00AM -
12:15PM
No Room Needed CMC class. Instructor consent and CGU Registration Form-Claremont Colleges Courses required, located at https://mycampus.cgu.edu/web/registrar/forms This course covers the mathematical fundamentals of digital image process. Topics include image representation and formation, filtering and enhancement, the Fourier transform, image restoration, morphological image processing, and image segmentation. Course Prerequisite: Math 60 on linear algebra, Math 111 on ordinary differential equations, and a programming course.

MATH
293 1004 1 2 - 4   Mathematics Clinic
TextbookTextbook
Allon Percus Wed 1:10PM -
3:00PM
Math North (1263 N. Dartmouth) Department consent required. Class meetings in Math North (1263 N. Dartmouth Ave.). Additional hour of online content required each week. The Mathematics Clinic provides applied, real-world research experience. A team of 3-5 students will work on an open-ended research problem from an industrial partner, under the guidance of a faculty advisor. Problems involve a wide array of techniques from mathematical modeling as well as from engineering and computer science. Clinic projects generally address problems of sufficient magnitude and complexity that their analysis, solution and exposition require a significant team effort. Students are normally expected to enroll in Math 393 (Advanced Mathematics Clinic) in the subsequent semester. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

MATH
294 1002 W 4   Methods of Applied Mathematics
TextbookTextbook
Ali Nadim Thu 8:10PM -
10:00PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. Applications of linear algebra and differential equations in modeling. Concepts such as vector spaces, solvability of linear systems, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, singular value decomposition, matrix norms, matrix exponentials, solution of ODEs, nonlinear dynamical systems, bifurcations, phase-plane analysis, stability of fixed points, and Floquet theory are reviewed. They are illustrated through examples such as Leslie population models, Google’s PageRank algorithm, Markov chains, image compression, population dynamics, linear and nonlinear oscillators, predator-prey models, spread of epidemics, enzyme kinetics, gene/protein regulatory networks and the like. Familiarity with undergraduate level differential equations and linear algebra will be helpful.

MATH
306 1007 W 4   Optimization
TextbookTextbook
Marina Chugunova Tue 5:50PM -
7:40PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. This course concentrates on recognizing and solving convex optimization problems that arise in applications. The course material covers: convex sets, functions, and optimization problems; basics of convex analysis: least-squares, linear and quadratic programs, semidefinite programming, minimax, extremal volume; optimality conditions, duality theory, theorems of alternative, interior-point methods; applications to statistics, machine learning, and finance. This course should benefit anyone who uses or will use scientific computing or numerical optimization in computational mathematics or engineering (e.g., machine learning, financial engineering).

MATH
337PO 1050 1 4   Real & Functional Analysis I
TextbookTextbook
Stephan Garcia TueThu 1:15PM -
2:30PM
No Room Needed Pomona class. Instructor consent and CGU Registration Form-Claremont Colleges Courses required, located at https://mycampus.cgu.edu/web/registrar/forms Abstract measures, Lebesgue measure on Rn, and Lebesgue-Stieljes measures on R. The Lebesgue integral and limit theorems. Product measures and the Fubini theorem. Additional related topics as time permits. Prerequisite: Math 131 and Math 132. (Formerly Math 331)

MATH
355 1006 W 4   Linear Statistical Models
TextbookTextbook
John Angus Mon 1:10PM -
3:00PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. A discussion of linear statistical models in both the full and less-than-full rank cases, the Gauss-Markov theorem, and applications to regression analysis, analysis of variance, and analysis of covariance. Topics in design of experiments and multivariate analysis. Prerequisite: linear algebra and a year course in probability and statistics.

MATH
358 1005 W 4   Mathematical Finance
TextbookTextbook
Henry Schellhorn Wed 1:10PM -
3:00PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. This class will cover the theory of option pricing, emphasizing the Black-Scholes model and interest rate models. Implementation of the theory and model calibration are covered in the companion class, Numerical Methods for Finance, Math 361. We will see the binomial no-arbitrage pricing model, state prices, Brownian motion, stochastic integration, and Ito’s lemma, the Black-Scholes equation, risk-neutral pricing and Girsanov theorem, change of numeraire and two term structure models: Vasicek and LIBOR. Prerequisites: Mature understanding of advanced calculus and probability (at the level of Math 251) and permission of instructor. Math 256 would be helpful.

MATH
368 1003 W 4   Numerical Methods for Matrix Computations
TextbookTextbook
Ali Nadim Thu 3:30PM -
5:20PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. This course is an in-depth study of numerical linear algebra and the matrix computations that arise in solving linear systems, least-squares problems, and eigenvalue problems for both dense and sparse matrices. It will cover many of the fundamental algorithms such as LU decomposition, Jacobi, Gauss-Seidel and SOR iterations, Krylov subspace methods (e.g., Conjugate Gradient and GMRES), QR and SVD factorization of matrices, eigenvalue problems via power, inverse, and Arnoldi iterations. It will also introduce condition numbers and error analysis, forward and backward stability, constrained and unconstrained optimization problems. The course is designed for those who wish to use matrix computations in their own research. A background in linear algebra and some computational skills (e.g., MATLAB, Python or C) are assumed.

MATH
387 1042 W 4   Discrete Mathematical Modeling
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Fri 9:00AM -
11:50AM
TBA Instructor: Lajpat Rai Raheja. Online class. Discrete mathematics deals with countable quantities. The techniques used for discrete models often differ significantly from those used for continuous models. This course explores some of the main techniques and problems that arise in discrete mathematical modeling. Topics include combinatorial analysis, Markov chains, graph theory, optimization, algorithmic behavior and phase transitions in random combinatorics. The goal is for students to acquire sufficient skills to solve real-world problems requiring discrete mathematical models. Prerequisite: Probability and linear algebra. A previous course in discrete mathematics would be helpful.

MATH
389K 1012 W 4   Qualitative Analysis of Nonlinear Differential Equations
TextbookTextbook
Marina Chugunova Thu 8:10PM -
10:00PM
TBA Online class. Class meets Tuesdays (8-8:50pm) and Thursdays (8:10-10pm). Advanced topics in the study of nonlinear ordinary and partial differential equations. Topics may include: inverse spectral problems for Sturm-. Liouville differential operators, inverse problems for partial differential equations, local and global existence of weak solutions, applications of Sobolev spaces, energy and entropy methods, degenerate parabolic equations, higher order ordinary differential and partial differential equations, the calculus of variations and numerical analysis with emphasize on finite element methods.

MATH
389M 1011 W 4   Advanced Probability and Statistics
TextbookTextbook
John Angus Mon 5:50PM -
7:40PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. This is a graduate level course in Probability and Mathematical Statistics, which assumes students have successfully completed Math 151/251 (Probability) and Math 152/252 (Statistics), Linear Algebra, and have a mature understanding of Advanced Calculus (e.g. Math 231). Concurrent enrollment in a measure-theoretic course in analysis (e.g. math Math 337) would be ideal, but not required. Topics focus on the Mathematical foundations of the subjects, including modes of convergence of sequences of random variables and vectors, laws of large numbers, central limit theorems, distribution theory, statistical point estimation (including Cramer-Rao, Rao-Blackwell and Lehmann-Scheffe theorems), and advanced topics in statistical hypothesis testing and interval estimation.

MATH
458A 1010 W 2 M2 Quantitative Risk Management
TextbookTextbook
Michael B. Imerman Tue 1:10PM -
3:00PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. This course will focus on the calculation of Value-at-Risk, risk theory, and extreme value theory. We will also study coherent measures of risk, the Basle accords, and, if time allows, the role of BIS. There will be a practical assignment with data coming from Riskmetrics. We will discuss practical issues following the 2008-2009 financial crisis. Prerequisite: Math 256 & knowledge of derivatives.

MATH
499 1383 1 0   Doctoral Study (PhD Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Doctoral Study is the continuation course for a doctoral student to complete their dissertation and other requirements for the degree.

MGT
306 1134 W1 4   Business Analytics
TextbookTextbook
Roberto L Pedace Wed 8:30AM -
10:20AM
TBA Online class. Department consent required. Additional hour of online content required each week. This course is designed to provide an introduction to statistical methods useful for analyzing data, with specific application to problems of business and economics. At the end of the class, students will have an understanding of uncertainty and risk management, estimation and forecasting, optimization, and the logic of statistical inference. Students will also be expected to learn how to use statistics to think critically about real world issues. Statistical methodology and theory will be presented in an applications context. Ultimately, the goal is to provide students with quantitative tools that can be used in the areas of economics, marketing, financial and managerial accounting, corporate finance, and applied operational methods.

MGT
306 1135 W2 4   Business Analytics
TextbookTextbook
Roberto L Pedace Mon 8:10PM -
10:00PM
TBA Online class. Department consent required. Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. This course is designed to provide an introduction to statistical methods useful for analyzing data, with specific application to problems of business and economics. At the end of the class, students will have an understanding of uncertainty and risk management, estimation and forecasting, optimization, and the logic of statistical inference. Students will also be expected to learn how to use statistics to think critically about real world issues. Statistical methodology and theory will be presented in an applications context. Ultimately, the goal is to provide students with quantitative tools that can be used in the areas of economics, marketing, financial and managerial accounting, corporate finance, and applied operational methods.

MGT
321 1174 W2 2 M1 Marketing Management
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Wed 10:50AM -
12:40PM
TBA Instructor: Haakon Brown. Online class. Department consent required. Additional hour of online content required each week. Marketing Management (MGT 321) introduces marketing and its role within organizations. It introduces the marketing concept, examines its relationship to other functions in the firm and looks at techniques and frameworks used to examine marketing environments, understand consumer and organizational buying behavior, segment markets and position products. Marketing tactics around product, price, place and promotion are briefly introduced. This course balances important marketing principles with application to a range of different sectors.

MGT
321 1175 W3 2 M1 Marketing Management
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Wed 5:50PM -
7:40PM
TBA Instructor: Haakon Brown. Online class. Department consent required. Additional hour of online content required each week. Marketing Management (MGT 321) introduces marketing and its role within organizations. It introduces the marketing concept, examines its relationship to other functions in the firm and looks at techniques and frameworks used to examine marketing environments, understand consumer and organizational buying behavior, segment markets and position products. Marketing tactics around product, price, place and promotion are briefly introduced. This course balances important marketing principles with application to a range of different sectors.

MGT
324 1190 W 4   Marketing Research
TextbookTextbook
Stephen A Samaha Tue 5:50PM -
7:40PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. The aim of this course is to introduce students to the design and implementation of marketing research. Emphasis is placed on the appropriate choice and design of marketing research, methodologies and interpretation, use and dissemination of marketing information. Both qualitative and quantitative approaches are addressed. By the end of the course, students should be able to: (1) understand each stage of the marketing research process; (2) appreciate different qualitative and quantitative approaches to conducting marketing research; (3) be able to construct a survey and analyze survey data; and (4) be able to ascertain the quality of any research proposal or completed study they might be presented with. Emphasis will be placed upon establishing the usefulness of the research to aid managerial decision-making.

MGT
325 1141 W1 2 M1 Finding Clarity: For Critical Career Issues
TextbookTextbook
Jeremy Hunter, Vijay Sathe Tue 1:10PM -
3:00PM
TBA Online class. Department consent required. Additional hour of online content required each week. This 2 unit course will teach you the intellectual and emotional skills needed to be productive and happy in your job -- and in your career, as it progresses from one job to the next. These skills include: how to identify jobs and organizations in which you are likely to flourish, how to avoid recruiting traps and traps that await you in any new job, how to gain credibility in the organization, and how to boost your job performance, job satisfaction, happiness at work, and professional growth.

MGT
325 1142 W2 2 M1 Finding Clarity: For Critical Career Issues
TextbookTextbook
Jeremy Hunter, Vijay Sathe Tue 5:50PM -
7:40PM
TBA Online class. Department consent required. Additional hour of online content required each week. This 2 unit course will teach you the intellectual and emotional skills needed to be productive and happy in your job -- and in your career, as it progresses from one job to the next. These skills include: how to identify jobs and organizations in which you are likely to flourish, how to avoid recruiting traps and traps that await you in any new job, how to gain credibility in the organization, and how to boost your job performance, job satisfaction, happiness at work, and professional growth.

MGT
326 1182 W 2 M2 Financial Accounting
TextbookTextbook
James Wallace Tue 8:30AM -
10:20AM
TBA Online class. Department consent required. Additional hour of online content required each week. The goal of this course is to enable the student to appreciate and understand financial accounting-the language of business-from the perspective of the user/manager. By the end of the course, the student will understand the basic rules governing the preparation of financial statements, the flexibility that exists within these rules, possible incentives for management to make choices from within these rules, and the output from this environment.

MGT
332 1197 W 2 M2 Fin Tech
TextbookTextbook
Michael B. Imerman Mon 5:50PM -
7:40PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. This course will provide an introduction to and overview of the increasingly important intersection of financial services and technological innovation, known as "FinTech". Each week will provide a glimpse into the different functional areas within the FinTech ecosystem including: payments technologies, mobile/online banking, robo-advisors and automated wealth management services, technology-enabled lending platforms including peer-to-peer (P2P) lending, etc. The class will also examine some of the new risks that are emerging from the collision of the regulated world of finance finance and the largely unregulated world of technology. Each lesson will include mini case studies and examples to illustrate the technological innovations that have arisen in the functional areas within the FinTech ecosystem, with an emphasis on making the distinction between disruptive versus sustaining innovations in financial services.

MGT
340 1136 W 4   Strategy
TextbookTextbook
Hideki Yamawaki Mon 8:10PM -
10:00PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. The focus of this course is on how general managers enhance and sustain business performance. The course covers analytical and conceptual tools that are aids to the development of decision. Its fundamental focus, however, is not on tools but on sharpening skills at developing robust judgments in the face of uncertainty and complexity. The central concept of this course is that of strategy. Strategy is enabled and constrained by the underlying economic and political conditions that prevail in an industry or a country, as well as by the resources available to management.

MGT
345B 1176 W1 2 M1 Organizational Behavior
TextbookTextbook
Kristine M Kawamura Wed 1:10PM -
3:00PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. The purpose of this course is to provide students with a foundation of the fundamental skills they will need to understand, diagnose, and manage organizational behavior in order to attain the organization’s mission more effectively. We will conduct structured classroom exercises geared toward discovering your own strengths and their potential for optimizing your contribution to an organization.

MGT
345B 1177 W2 2 M1 Organizational Behavior
TextbookTextbook
Kristine M Kawamura Thu 8:10PM -
10:00PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. The purpose of this course is to provide students with a foundation of the fundamental skills they will need to understand, diagnose, and manage organizational behavior in order to attain the organization’s mission more effectively. We will conduct structured classroom exercises geared toward discovering your own strengths and their potential for optimizing your contribution to an organization.

MGT
350 1415 W 2 M2 The Analytic Mind
TextbookTextbook
James Wallace Thu 3:30PM -
5:20PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. This course will cover the four components of the analytic mindset process: ask the right questions; find the data needed to answer the questions; analyze the data; present the findings. Much of the foundation for this course will come from the Ernst & Young coursework that is available for use in the classroom. As such, where will be a bias toward accounting/finance, however the process used can be generalized to any field.

MGT
353 1191 W 4   7 Steps to Start Up: From Idea to Prototype
TextbookTextbook
Hovig Tchalian Mon 3:30PM -
5:20PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. This entrepreneurship course guides participants through a fast-start approach to taking a startup from concept to launch. Those wanting to take the course will submit an initial idea for launching an entrepreneurial venture and follow a method to moving it substantially closer to launch.

MGT
357 1187 W 2 M2 Managing Client Relations and Customer Experience Management
TextbookTextbook
Bernard J Jaworski Fri 7:00PM -
9:50PM
TBA Online class. Class meets on Fri (7-9:50pm) 11/6 & 12/4, and Saturday (9am-5:20pm) 11/7 & 12/5 The purpose of this course is to familiarize students with the art and science of developing, nurturing and sustaining client relationships. While this course is biased toward those in professional services firms, the development of clients extends to any firms that have direct sales forces or face-to-face, client development activities. At first glance, this may seem like a straightforward activity, namely, the selling of products/services into a targeted client organization. However, there is a major difference between client advisors who are “average” and those who are “expert” practitioners. This course is designed to surface the “tradecraft” of individuals who have deep substantive knowledge, high integrity, and a gift in developing trusted client relationships. In effect, these are the “rainmaker” practitioners.

MGT
368 1188 W 2 M1 Women in Business
TextbookTextbook
Katharina Pick Fri 7:00PM -
9:50PM
TBA Online class. Class meets on Friday 9/11, 10/2 from 7-9:50pm and Saturday 9/12, 10/3 9am-5:20pm The aim of this course is to provide information and insights to students interested in the intersection of gender, management, and (business) organizations. The emphasis is not on teaching women how to be effective since there are no clear-cut ways to do this. Rather the course takes the approach that both women and men are more effective professionals and leaders when they understand the historical and current dynamics of gender in organizations. While women have made great strides towards equality, many aspects of professional life continue to reflect gendered outcomes and experiences. This course examines the underlying dynamics that shape these outcomes and experiences. Topics include power and influence, negotiation, work-life challenges and social expectations, and leadership. Through case discussions and exposure to current research findings, students will learn how to analyze and make sense of gendered dynamics in the business world and beyond. A secondary objective of the course is to allow students to reflect on their own experiences; to provoke them to think about their own assumptions and to help them develop their own perspective and leadership style. The purpose is not to provide students with a set of clear-cut tactics, but rather to expose them to the issues related to women in business and provide a basis for them to be aware, thoughtful, and confident members of organizations. Finally, this course is a collaborative endeavor. We have the opportunity to learn a tremendous amount from each other and to develop a collaboration that will carry on over years beyond the end of the course. The course is open to women and men and will benefit from all types of diversity.

MGT
373 1193 W 4   Financial Strategy and Valuation
TextbookTextbook
Zeynep Ayca Altintig Wed 8:10PM -
10:00PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. This course will investigate the key financial choices of a corporation and their impact on the overall strategy of the firm. Payout policy (dividends and share repurchases) will be one of the topics covered in this course. We will then study the securities issuance decision of the firm, including intitial and secondary public offerings (IPOs and SEOs). Value creation and mergers & acquisitions will be another topic we will investigate. Finally, we will examine corporate governance policies as they pertain to the overall strategy of the firm.

MGT
379A 1137 1 1   Leadership Practicum
TextbookTextbook
Katharina Pick Tue 5:50PM -
7:40PM
To Be Determined Class meets on Tuesday 9/1, 10/6, 11/3, 12/1 from 5:50-7:40pm. Department consent required. Additional online content required. This practicum is an underlying leadership development substrate to our technical education and leadership curriculum. Through intensive, lab-based work, students will learn the emotional and behavioral skills to begin a life-long practice of leadership. This practicum reflects the philosophy articulated by Warren Bennis that leadership cannot be taught, but rather must be learned. The practicum will not “create leaders” but rather will help students develop the tools, practices and insights that are required if one is to become a leader over time.

MGT
380 1178 W 2 M1 Drucker Philosophy
TextbookTextbook
Bernard J Jaworski MonThu 9:00AM -
4:50PM
TBA Online class. Class meets (9am-5pm) on Mon 8/24, Thurs 8/27, and Sat 9/12. Class begins prior to start of Fall 2020 term. Department consent required. This course focuses on self-management, professionalization, written communication, and critical thinking

MGT
380A 1138 W1 1   Create Your Future
TextbookTextbook
Kristine M Kawamura Tue 3:30PM -
5:20PM
TBA Online class. Class meets on Tuesday 9/8, 10/13, 11/10, 12/8. Department consent required. Additional online content required. Drucker famously said: "Management is neither an art nor a science. It is a practice." The goal of this 2-unit practicum is to help students enhance their own management experiences. Students can select from a menu of options and are encouraged to engage in as much variety as possible. The options include: an introduction to the practice of management, working in an internship or corporate residency, starting a business, undertaking a consulting project, shadowing a C- Suite executive, or serving on a Board.

MGT
380A 1139 W2 1   Create Your Future
TextbookTextbook
Kristine M Kawamura Tue 5:50PM -
7:40PM
TBA Online class. Class meets on Tuesday 9/8, 10/13, 11/10, 12/8. Department consent required. Additional online content required. Drucker famously said: "Management is neither an art nor a science. It is a practice." The goal of this 2-unit practicum is to help students enhance their own management experiences. Students can select from a menu of options and are encouraged to engage in as much variety as possible. The options include: an introduction to the practice of management, working in an internship or corporate residency, starting a business, undertaking a consulting project, shadowing a C- Suite executive, or serving on a Board.

MGT
380A 1140 W3 1   Create Your Future
TextbookTextbook
Kristine M Kawamura Wed 8:10PM -
10:00PM
TBA Online class. Class meets on Wednesday 9/9, 10/14, 11/11, 12/9 from 7-9:50pm. Department consent required. Additional online content required. Drucker famously said: "Management is neither an art nor a science. It is a practice." The goal of this 2-unit practicum is to help students enhance their own management experiences. Students can select from a menu of options and are encouraged to engage in as much variety as possible. The options include: an introduction to the practice of management, working in an internship or corporate residency, starting a business, undertaking a consulting project, shadowing a C- Suite executive, or serving on a Board.

MGT
383 1184 W 2 M2 Economics of Strategy
TextbookTextbook
Jay Prag Iv Wed 10:50AM -
12:40PM
TBA Online class. Department consent required. Additional hour of online content required each week. This class uses the business-related tenets of economics (old and new) to generate a modern, consistent, formal framework for strategic decision-making. Using economic intuition we will be able to address issues ranging from outsourcing to new product lines. We will be able to explain why some firms actively compete through price changes while others, in apparently similar competitive industries, do not. Economic theories seem very abstract to many students because these theories usually assume many unrealistic things about people and society. Students must be mindful of the fact that these assumptions are what allow economists to answer many otherwise intractable questions. The results that we attain usually hold even without these simplifying assumptions. This class will show how some of these economic models can provide a powerful, formal framework for answering managerial questions ranging from dealing with competition to setting proper incentives for managers.

MGT
391 1195 W 2 M1 Introduction to Risk Management
TextbookTextbook
Michael B. Imerman Tue 8:10PM -
10:00PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. The course will provide a comprehensive introduction to risk management from the perspective of both financial and non-financial institutions. It covers the design and operation of a risk-management system, the technical modeling within that system, and the interplay between the internal oversight and the external regulatory components of the system.

MGT
400M 1205 1 0   Continuous Registration (MA Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Continuous Registration is the continuation course for a master's level student to complete requirements for the degree.

MGT
408 1196 W 2 M1 The Art & Science of Project Management
TextbookTextbook
Karen Higgins Tue 5:50PM -
7:40PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. This course takes a holistic or system view of projects. It provides a basic understanding of project management tools such as cost, schedule, and performance metrics, PERT charts and Earned Value, but it goes beyond these traditional processes. The course presents a project manager’s or leader’s actions as interactive pieces of a whole, knit together as a “system”. It then emphasizes how managers can proactively shape the organizational environment in which they work to increase the probability of success in today’s more complex and interdependent world..

MGT
409 1198 W 2 M2 Systems Thinking
TextbookTextbook
Karen Higgins Tue 5:50PM -
7:40PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. This course exposes students to systems thinking and develops their capacities to analyze complex problems within a broad and long-term context. It develops students’ proficiency with system thinking tools, including causal loop diagrams, behavior over time graphs, and systems archetypes. It then introduces increasingly complex and encompassing problems as illustrated in the diagram below. Initial sessions focus on systems interpretations of individual behaviors (e.g., motivation, values, expectations, and ethics) and of organizational features (e.g., incentive systems, short-term orientation, and cultures). Later sessions integrate these views into systems interpretations of the national and global economies. The final session applies all these insights to economic, environmental, and social sustainability for the future.

MGT
475 1194 W 4   Selected Topics in Finance: Fixed Income & Other Investments
TextbookTextbook
Jay Prag Iv Tue 5:50PM -
7:40PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. This class will discuss the pricing theories, investing concepts and institutions of bonds and related interest-rate instruments. We will discuss a broad range of financial instruments including corporate debt, municipal debt, CDO’s, and interest rate derivatives (options, futures, swaps, etc.) We will also discuss bond portfolio management and related issues such as immunization. An entire semester discussing and valuing bonds might seem like overkill, especially when one considers how little attention the financial press pays to the bond market. Investing, portfolios and brokers usually make people think of stocks not bonds. But the fundamentals of investing and valuation are most clearly seen and best understood with bonds. A mastery of fixed income investment techniques will prepare you for tackling most investment problems.

MGT
499 1204 1 0   Doctoral Study (PhD Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Doctoral Study is the continuation course for a doctoral student to complete their dissertation and other requirements for the degree.

MGT
511 1266 W 2 E2 Financial Accounting
TextbookTextbook
James Wallace Thu 5:50PM -
7:40PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. The goal of this course is to enable the student to appreciate and understand financial accounting-the language of business-from the perspective of the user/manager. By the end of the course, the student will understand the basic rules governing the preparation of financial statements, the flexibility that exists within these rules, possible incentives for management to make choices from within these rules, and the output from this environment. This course will benefit anybody wishing to further her or his study of management.

MGT
512 1274 W 4 ER Corporate Finance
TextbookTextbook
Zeynep Ayca Altintig Sat 9:00AM -
11:50AM
TBA Online class. Class meets Sat (9:00-11:50): 9/5, 9/26, 10/17, 11/7, 11/21, 12/12 and also Thurs (8:10pm-10pm): 9/10, 9/17, 10/1, 10/8, 10/22, 10/29, 11/12, 12/3, 12/10. Additional online content required. This course explores the fundamental nature of the corporate finance function and the conceptual and theoretical underpinnings of tools for successful financial management. The course is divided into two parts. In Part I, the theory of finance is examined using a conceptual approach that provides the basic tools and concepts necessary for the handling of financial decision-making situations. Topics include capital budgeting, capital markets and securities, risk, return and diversification, valuation, cost of capital, and capital structure. In Part II, an array of cases is used in order to foster students’ ability to apply the tools and analytical skills to real-world situations.

MGT
519 1304 W 2 E1 Drucker Philosophy
TextbookTextbook
Bernard J Jaworski Sat 9:00AM -
4:50PM
TBA Online class. Class meets on Sat 10/3, 10/10, and 10/24 This course focuses on the life work and key principles of Peter F. Drucker. It is a survey of his work – so, by definition, we will not be able to cover the full spectrum of his thinking. However, you will be exposed to his philosophy – from leading self, organizations and businesses, and to the broader functioning of society itself.

MGT
525A 1305 W 1 ER Leadership Practicum A
TextbookTextbook
Katharina Pick Sat 12:30PM -
4:00PM
TBA Online class. Class meets on Sat 9/19 and 10/17 (12:30pm-4pm), and Sat 11/14 (9am-12:30pm) "Management can be taught, but leadership must be learned." This quotation from Warren Bennis reflects the current state of the play in leadership development. Although teaching leadership concepts and theories in the classroom is important, researchers and practitioners agree that this is not how people actually develop leadership skills or become leaders. Rather, developing as a leader is a lifelong process of integrating experiences, experimenting with behaviors, encountering unfamiliar contexts and challenging situations, emulating role models, building self-awareness, and finding oneself and one’s purpose. There are no clear prescriptions in this process, and each person’s journey is his/her own. However, there are skills, habits, insights, and attitudes you can bring to this lifelong process that can enhance (or also hinder) your ability to develop leadership. The aim of this course is to teach you those that can help you.

MGT
552 1306 W 2 E2 The Effective Executive
TextbookTextbook
Vijay Sathe Sat 2:50PM -
4:40PM
TBA Online class. Additional online content required each week. The focus of Peter Drucker’s book The Effective Executive is on "managing oneself for effectiveness." As he put it, “Executives who do not manage themselves for effectiveness cannot possibly expect to manage their associates and subordinates... Effectiveness is what executives are paid for, whether they work as managers who are responsible for the performance of others as well as their own, or as individual contributors for their own performance only." (2006, p. ix). This course builds on Drucker’s seminal work by focusing on how you can become more effective in the workplace by understanding and applying the keys that drive job performance, job satisfaction, happiness at work and personal and professional growth.

MGT
726 1307 W 2 E1 Creating Effective Organizations
TextbookTextbook
Kristine M Kawamura Sat 9:00AM -
4:50PM
TBA Online class. Class meets on Sat 9/5, 9/12, and 9/26 This course examines how managers can create more effective organizations. We focus on the following areas for improving organizational effectiveness: • Conflict, power and politics within an organization • Personal and professional networks within an organization • Alternative organizational structures, such as functional, divisional, geographic, matrix, and horizontal structures • Techniques for managing an organization's dependencies on its external (resource) environment • The role of innovation and organizational learning Our perspective is based on past research on the study of organizations (Professor Richard Daft's textbook on Organizational Theory and Design) and Harvard Business School cases geared toward these practical organizational issues. By highlighting the organizational-level, this course complements both Organizational Behavior (MGT 515), focused on individuals and groups, and Strategy (MGT 550), focused on strategic positioning and resources/competences.

MUSIC
233 1129 1 2 - 4   Flute
TextbookTextbook
Keren Schweitzer  -
No Room Needed Scheduled independently with instructor. This class is taught as an individual lesson. Special arrangements must be made by the student’s academic advisor, the student, and the instructor prior to registering for this class.

MUSIC
236 1144 1 2 - 4   Harpsichord
TextbookTextbook
Robert Zappulla  -
No Room Needed Scheduled independently with instructor. This class is taught as an individual lesson. Special arrangements must be made by the student’s academic advisor, the student and the instructor prior to registering for this class. Students must select 4 units, until the minimum total units of lessons required for your degree has been completed. After the minimum has been met, students may select 2 or 4 units. 2 units = 7 hours of individual instruction, 4 units = 14 hours of individual instruction.

MUSIC
241 1238 1 2 - 4   Piano
TextbookTextbook
Jenny Soonjin Kim  -
No Room Needed Scheduled independently with instructor. This class is taught as an individual lesson. Special arrangements must be made by the student’s academic advisor, the student and the instructor prior to registering for this class. Students must select 4 units, until the minimum total units of lessons required for your degree has been completed. After the minimum has been met, students may select 2 or 4 units. 2 units = 7 hours of individual instruction, 4 units = 14 hours of individual instruction.

MUSIC
248 1237 1 2 - 4   Violin
TextbookTextbook
Lindsey D Strand-Polyak  -
No Room Needed Scheduled independently with instructor. This class is taught as an individual lesson. Special arrangements must be made by the student’s academic advisor, the student and the instructor prior to registering for this class. Students must select 4 units, until the minimum total units of lessons required for your degree has been completed. After the minimum has been met, students may select 2 or 4 units. 2 units = 7 hours of individual instruction, 4 units = 14 hours of individual instruction.

MUSIC
249 1236 1 2 - 4   Violoncello
TextbookTextbook
Marek Szpakiewicz  -
No Room Needed Scheduled independently with instructor. This class is taught as an individual lesson. Special arrangements must be made by the student's academic advisor, the student, and the instructor prior to registering for this class.

MUSIC
250 1462 1 2 - 4   Voice
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Instructor: Helene Quintana. Scheduled independently with instructor. This class is taught as an individual lesson. Special arrangements must be made by the student’s academic advisor, the student and the instructor prior to registering for this class. Students must select 4 units, until the minimum total units of lessons required for your degree has been completed. After the minimum has been met, students may select 2 or 4 units. 2 units = 7 hours of individual instruction, 4 units = 14 hours of individual instruction.

MUSIC
250 1463 2 2 - 4   Voice
TextbookTextbook
Camelia Voin  -
No Room Needed Scheduled independently with instructor. This class is taught as an individual lesson. Special arrangements must be made by the student’s academic advisor, the student and the instructor prior to registering for this class. Students must select 4 units, until the minimum total units of lessons required for your degree has been completed. After the minimum has been met, students may select 2 or 4 units. 2 units = 7 hours of individual instruction, 4 units = 14 hours of individual instruction.

MUSIC
250 1477 3 2 - 4   Voice
TextbookTextbook
Charles Roe  -
No Room Needed Scheduled independently with instructor. This class is taught as an individual lesson. Special arrangements must be made by the student’s academic advisor, the student and the instructor prior to registering for this class. Students must select 4 units, until the minimum total units of lessons required for your degree has been completed. After the minimum has been met, students may select 2 or 4 units. 2 units = 7 hours of individual instruction, 4 units = 14 hours of individual instruction.

MUSIC
251 1235 1 2 - 4   Conducting
TextbookTextbook
David J Rentz  -
No Room Needed Scheduled independently with instructor. This class is taught as an individual lesson. Special arrangements must be made by the student’s academic advisor, the student and the instructor prior to registering for this class. Students must select 4 units, until the minimum total units of lessons required for your degree has been completed. After the minimum has been met, students may select 2 or 4 units. 2 units = 7 hours of individual instruction, 4 units = 14 hours of individual instruction.

MUSIC
259 1234 1 2 - 4   Fortepiano
TextbookTextbook
Jenny Soonjin Kim  -
No Room Needed Scheduled independently with instructor. This class is taught as an individual lesson. Special arrangements must be made by the student’s academic advisor, the student and the instructor prior to registering for this class. Students must select 4 units, until the minimum total units of lessons required for your degree has been completed. After the minimum has been met, students may select 2 or 4 units. 2 units = 7 hours of individual instruction, 4 units = 14 hours of individual instruction.

MUSIC
270 1233 1 1   Keyboard Performance Forum
TextbookTextbook
Jenny Soonjin Kim Thu 10:50AM -
12:40PM
To Be Determined Additional hour of online content required each week. This course is essentially a playing/master class open to all students enrolled in keyboard performance programs, as well as other Music students with a high level of keyboard proficiency by permission of the instructor. Students will perform regularly and be critiqued by the instructor and other course members. A strong emphasis will be placed on historical performance practices as outlined in primary sources, thus periodic reading assignments from keyboard performance treatises throughout history will comprise an important part of the course.

MUSIC
271 1231 1 2 - 4   Chamber Music
TextbookTextbook
Lindsey D Strand-Polyak  -
No Room Needed Scheduled independently with instructor. This class is taught as an individual lesson. Special arrangements must be made by the student’s academic advisor, the student and the instructor prior to registering for this class. Students must select 4 units, until the minimum total units of lessons required for your degree has been completed. After the minimum has been met, students may select 2 or 4 units. 2 units = 7 hours of individual instruction, 4 units = 14 hours of individual instruction.

MUSIC
293 1229 W1 2 - 4   Composition
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
TBA Instructor: William Alves. Class meetings will individually take place online. This class is taught as an individual lesson. Special arrangements must be made by the student’s academic advisor, the student and the instructor prior to registering for this class. Students must select 4 units, until the minimum total units of lessons required for your degree has been completed. After the minimum has been met, students may select 2 or 4 units. 2 units = 7 hours of individual instruction, 4 units = 14 hours of individual instruction.

MUSIC
293 1427 W2 2 - 4   Composition
TextbookTextbook
Peter Boyer  -
TBA Online class. This class is taught as an individual lesson. Special arrangements must be made by the student’s academic advisor, the student and the instructor prior to registering for this class. Students must select 4 units, until the minimum total units of lessons required for your degree has been completed. After the minimum has been met, students may select 2 or 4 units. 2 units = 7 hours of individual instruction, 4 units = 14 hours of individual instruction.

MUSIC
299RP 1218 1 0   Recital Preparation
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Instructor: William Alves. Scheduled independently with instructor. Recital Preparation is available to music students who have completed the required number of individual lesson units for their degree program, but still require further preparation before giving their final degree recital(s). The course consists of 14 individual 1-hour instrument lessons. Instructor permission is required, and day/time of individual lessons should be arranged directly with instructor. Students that have completed all coursework requirements, must also register for Doctoral Studies (DMA/DCM/PhD) or Continuous Registration (MA). Course fee applies, see department for amount.

MUSIC
299RP 1494 10 0   Recital Preparation
TextbookTextbook
David J Rentz  -
No Room Needed See department for meeting details. Department consent required. Recital Preparation is available to music students who have completed the required number of individual lesson units for their degree program, but still require further preparation before giving their final degree recital(s). The course consists of 14 individual 1-hour instrument lessons. Instructor permission is required, and day/time of individual lessons should be arranged directly with instructor. Students that have completed all coursework requirements, must also register for Doctoral Studies (DMA/DCM/PhD) or Continuous Registration (MA). Course fee applies, see department for amount.

MUSIC
299RP 1219 2 0   Recital Preparation
TextbookTextbook
Chan Ho Yun  -
No Room Needed Scheduled independently with instructor. Recital Preparation is available to music students who have completed the required number of individual lesson units for their degree program, but still require further preparation before giving their final degree recital(s). The course consists of 14 individual 1-hour instrument lessons. Instructor permission is required, and day/time of individual lessons should be arranged directly with instructor. Students that have completed all coursework requirements, must also register for Doctoral Studies (DMA/DCM/PhD) or Continuous Registration (MA). Course fee applies, see department for amount.

MUSIC
299RP 1220 3 0   Recital Preparation
TextbookTextbook
Charles Roe  -
No Room Needed Scheduled independently with instructor. Recital Preparation is available to music students who have completed the required number of individual lesson units for their degree program, but still require further preparation before giving their final degree recital(s). The course consists of 14 individual 1-hour instrument lessons. Instructor permission is required, and day/time of individual lessons should be arranged directly with instructor. Students that have completed all coursework requirements, must also register for Doctoral Studies (DMA/DCM/PhD) or Continuous Registration (MA). Course fee applies, see department for amount.

MUSIC
299RP 1221 4 0   Recital Preparation
TextbookTextbook
Jenny Soonjin Kim  -
No Room Needed Scheduled independently with instructor. Recital Preparation is available to music students who have completed the required number of individual lesson units for their degree program, but still require further preparation before giving their final degree recital(s). The course consists of 14 individual 1-hour instrument lessons. Instructor permission is required, and day/time of individual lessons should be arranged directly with instructor. Students that have completed all coursework requirements, must also register for Doctoral Studies (DMA/DCM/PhD) or Continuous Registration (MA). Course fee applies, see department for amount.

MUSIC
299RP 1222 5 0   Recital Preparation
TextbookTextbook
Carey Robertson  -
No Room Needed Scheduled independently with instructor. Recital Preparation is available to music students who have completed the required number of individual lesson units for their degree program, but still require further preparation before giving their final degree recital(s). The course consists of 14 individual 1-hour instrument lessons. Instructor permission is required, and day/time of individual lessons should be arranged directly with instructor. Students that have completed all coursework requirements, must also register for Doctoral Studies (DMA/DCM/PhD) or Continuous Registration (MA). Course fee applies, see department for amount.

MUSIC
299RP 1223 6 0   Recital Preparation
TextbookTextbook
Camelia Voin  -
No Room Needed Scheduled independently with instructor. Recital Preparation is available to music students who have completed the required number of individual lesson units for their degree program, but still require further preparation before giving their final degree recital(s). The course consists of 14 individual 1-hour instrument lessons. Instructor permission is required, and day/time of individual lessons should be arranged directly with instructor. Students that have completed all coursework requirements, must also register for Doctoral Studies (DMA/DCM/PhD) or Continuous Registration (MA). Course fee applies, see department for amount.

MUSIC
299RP 1421 7 0   Recital Preparation
TextbookTextbook
Gayle Blankenburg  -
No Room Needed Scheduled independently with instructor. Recital Preparation is available to music students who have completed the required number of individual lesson units for their degree program, but still require further preparation before giving their final degree recital(s). The course consists of 14 individual 1-hour instrument lessons. Instructor permission is required, and day/time of individual lessons should be arranged directly with instructor. Students that have completed all coursework requirements, must also register for Doctoral Studies (DMA/DCM/PhD) or Continuous Registration (MA). Course fee applies, see department for amount.

MUSIC
299RP 1464 8 0   Recital Preparation
TextbookTextbook
Nadia Shpachenko-Gottesman  -
No Room Needed Scheduled independently with instructor. Recital Preparation is available to music students who have completed the required number of individual lesson units for their degree program, but still require further preparation before giving their final degree recital(s). The course consists of 14 individual 1-hour instrument lessons. Instructor permission is required, and day/time of individual lessons should be arranged directly with instructor. Students that have completed all coursework requirements, must also register for Doctoral Studies (DMA/DCM/PhD) or Continuous Registration (MA). Course fee applies, see department for amount.

MUSIC
299RP 1489 9 0   Recital Preparation
TextbookTextbook
Robert Zappulla  -
No Room Needed See department for meeting details. Department consent required. Recital Preparation is available to music students who have completed the required number of individual lesson units for their degree program, but still require further preparation before giving their final degree recital(s). The course consists of 14 individual 1-hour instrument lessons. Instructor permission is required, and day/time of individual lessons should be arranged directly with instructor. Students that have completed all coursework requirements, must also register for Doctoral Studies (DMA/DCM/PhD) or Continuous Registration (MA). Course fee applies, see department for amount.

MUSIC
301A 1217 W 4   Music Literature & Historical Styles Analysis
TextbookTextbook
Nancy Van Deusen Mon 1:10PM -
3:00PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. Designed to provide an overview of music literature from the Middle Ages to the mid-twentieth century with concentrated analysis of representative works, using analytical techniques appropriate for the period under discussion. Although this core sequence concentrates on Western music, comparison, as well as comparative methodologies, with other world music cultures may be introduced.

MUSIC
302 1214 W 4   Music Research Methodology & Bibliography
TextbookTextbook
Robert Zappulla Thu 5:50PM -
7:40PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. This course introduces the many types of electronic and print bibliographic tools needed to pursue research in music. The course also covers research methods, citation practices, and ways to evaluate research.

MUSIC
326 1215 W 4   The Music of Beethoven
TextbookTextbook
Robert Zappulla Mon 5:50PM -
7:40PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week.

MUSIC
335 1213 W 4   American Titans: The Music of Copland & Bernstein
TextbookTextbook
Peter Boyer Tue 10:50AM -
12:40PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. A study of the compositions and titanic contributions to American music of two of its seminal composers: Aaron Copland (1900-1990) and Leonard Bernstein (1918-1990). Biographical information on these composers will be addressed, as will their other highly significant musical activities as conductors, pianists, authors, teachers, and ambassadors of American musical culture; but the primary focus will be on their compositions. The course will examine their training; the influences of diverse musical styles, historical and cultural events upon their works; the genres to which they contributed; and the evolution of their individual compositional styles and techniques. Of particular interest will be questions regarding the establishment of an "American sound" on the world stage of music composition in the twentieth century, and the key roles played by Copland and Bernstein in this arena.

MUSIC
400M 1212 1 0   Continuous Registration (MA Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Continuous Registration is the continuation course for a master's level student to complete requirements for the degree.

MUSIC
401 1216 W 4   Music in the Middle Ages
TextbookTextbook
Nancy Van Deusen Wed 1:10PM -
3:00PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. The purpose of this course is to review concepts and music practices already studied (on the undergrad/master’s degree) level), and to develop basic analytical tools, as well as practical experience in research and reference works for this period. The question of how one proceeds with a research project, using manuscripts, indices, and available concordances, will be considered. N. van Deusen, The Cultural Context of Medieval Music (2011, available in Huntley Book Store) is recommended as a summary of concepts and terms useful for understanding medieval music in several of its dimensions. Music analysis is an ongoing process, and we will also apply many of these concepts, carefully articulated in the period(s) now known as the "Middle Ages" as relevant in terminology and concept, to ordinary concepts used today as well as to world music cultures.

MUSIC
499 1211 1 0   Doctoral Study (PhD Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Doctoral Study is the continuation course for a doctoral student to complete their dissertation and other requirements for the degree.

PFF
530 1330 W 0   Transdisciplinary Pedagogy for Ethical Education
TextbookTextbook
Shamini Dias, Shelby Lamar Fri 3:40PM -
6:30PM
TBA Online class. This course invites you on a transformative journey to develop the mindsets to become an ethical, agile leader of learning. We present teaching as a transdisciplinary and inclusive future-focused endeavor for positive learning and development in diverse settings, within and beyond the classroom. In doing so, we engage with the question of how we can effectively and ethically respond to increasingly complex global and institutional contexts in preparing learners holistically for their futures. Working collaboratively in multidisciplinary teams, we will use systems, complexity, and design thinking frameworks to explore student identities and diversity in our classrooms, the changing global paradigms that shift our teaching missions and methods, and what learning sciences and the ethics of education tell us about engagement and motivation. We will also draw from other key frameworks such as Universal Design for Learning (UDL), Active Learning, and Good Work in this exploration. We will work reflexively by integrating a Portfolio-based approach individually and in teams to explore and document our own assumptions, values, and beliefs about education and how these transform in the light of our discoveries about ethical, agile teaching. Our goal will be to co-create pedagogical principles that transcend disciplinary teaching and learning cultures toward agile, ethical leadership of learning in our diverse educational and work contexts. To earn the College Teaching Certificate, you also must complete the PFF 531 course, Pedagogy Practicum and Portfolio.

PFF
531 1331 W1 0   Teaching Practicum & Portfolio
TextbookTextbook
Shamini Dias, Shelby Lamar  -
TBA Online class. You must have completed the course, Transdisciplinary Pedagogy for Ethical Education (listed as PFF 530, PFF 520, or TNDY 430), to enroll in this course as it is a prerequisite for PFF 531 Teaching Practicum and Portfolio. This class structures your progress through the teaching practicum and completion of all the teaching portfolio items for the College Teaching Certificate. In this course, you will apply the principles and frameworks from “Transdisciplinary Pedagogy for Ethical Education” into practice. The class is presented through an online, asynchronous format with coaching modules and a structured assignment submission and feedback process. Using the work that you began in “Transdisciplinary Pedagogy for Ethical Education”, you will complete your teaching philosophy statement, diversity statement, and sample course design and syllabus. In addition, you will develop a sample learning management system course and a teacher-scholar website. The course culminates in a final integrated reflection of your entire PFF journey toward becoming an inclusive, future-focused educator.

PHIL
400M 1161 1 0   Continuous Registration (MA Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Continuous Registration is the continuation course for a master's level student to complete requirements for the degree.

PHIL
499 1155 1 0   Doctoral Study (PhD Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Doctoral Study is the continuation course for a doctoral student to complete their dissertation and other requirements for the degree.

PP
300 1413 W 4   American Politics & Institutions
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Mon 3:30PM -
5:20PM
TBA Instructor: TBD. Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. This core course introduces the process and institutions of American governance as understood by contemporary political scientists. The approach is thematic and covers a wide range of topics from conventional political institutions to political economy.

PP
323 1310 W 4   Racial & Ethnic Political Behavior
TextbookTextbook
Adrian D Pantoja Tue 3:30PM -
5:20PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. Examines the history and strategic position of minority groups in the American political system. Focusing on African-Americans, Latinos, Gays, Lesbians and Jews, we will try to gain an understanding of the political history of each group; similarities and differences between each group's struggle, strategies and outcomes; the record and future possibility of inter-group conflict and cooperation; and contemporary issues and obstacles facing each group in today's political climate.

PP
330 1131 W 4   Public Policy Process
TextbookTextbook
Heather Campbell Thu 3:30PM -
5:20PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. This core course examines how policy is formed, framed, and filtered in the American Political system. Various theories and models of policy making are examined and compared. Emphasis is placed on the process interactions between decision makers, interest groups, administrative agencies, the courts, the media, and the general citizenry in formulating, adopting, implementing and evaluating policy.

PP
469 1429 W 4   American Political Thought and Development
TextbookTextbook
Kenneth Leonardo Thu 8:10PM -
10:00PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. This course will provide an overview of American political thought from the American Founding to the present through an analysis of fundamental texts and sources. Topics and themes will include but are not limited to the political philosophy of the Founding Fathers, the criticisms of the Anti-Federalists, Tocqueville’s understanding of democracy in America, the statesmanship of Abraham Lincoln and the Civil War, African American political thought, progressivism, and capitalism.

PP
480 1414 W 4   Nature of Inquiry
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Wed 3:30PM -
5:20PM
TBA Instructor: TBD. Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. What is science? How does the scientific method work? Why does scientific research matter? The main goal of this course is to introduce students to the scientific process. We will explore the philosophical, technological, and methodological tools of science and their applications to research analysis. We will survey transdisciplinary approaches to the craft of research questions and hypotheses, data collection and measurement, data analysis and visualization, and different ways to effectively interpret and communicate research results. This course also introduces students to modern theories of causation and the role of data science (e.g., artificial intelligence, machine learning, and big data) for understanding the role of science in modern society and the solution to social problems. Students will also learn about the deep connections between science and philosophy, history, ethics, and the arts. Students will interact with the professor and other students through discussion, debate and transdisciplinary critical reviews of scientific studies to identify strengths and limitations of research designs and methodologies. By the end of the course, students should (1) be able to transform observations and creative research questions into testable hypotheses, (2) understand the philosophical, social, and methodological foundations of scientific practice, and (3) gained a general familiarity with the necessary tools to adequately assess the scientific value of information.

PP
482 1132 W 4   Advanced Quantitative Research Methods
TextbookTextbook
Heather Campbell Wed 5:50PM -
7:40PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. This is a course in regression analysis. Our attention will be focused partly on theoretical issues and partly on practical problems in applied regression. The dual aims of the course are to develop students' good taste as consumers of published quantitative research and to prepare them for more advanced study of econometric techniques.

PP
499 1425 1 0   Doctoral Study (PhD Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Doctoral Study is the continuation course for a doctoral student to complete their dissertation and other requirements for the degree.

PSYCH
302 1346 W 4   Research Methods
TextbookTextbook
William Crano Mon 8:30AM -
10:20AM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. This course surveys contemporary research methods in psychology. After a brief introduction to the philosophy of science, the major emphasis in the early portion of the course is on research conceptualization, design, and measurement, with a particular focus on the logic of minimizing the number of viable alternative explanations for a set of findings. The second part of the course covers issues of interpretation - from detecting data patterns to inferring whether a set of findings can be generalized to other people, places, and time periods. A number of specialized topics and the ethics of psychological studies are also covered.

PSYCH
302A 1347 W1 4   Research Methods
TextbookTextbook
Jason Siegel Fri 9:00AM -
11:50AM
TBA Online class. This course surveys contemporary research methods in psychology. After a brief introduction to the philosophy of science, the major emphasis in the early portion of the course is on research conceptualization, design, and measurement, with a particular focus on the logic of minimizing the number of viable alternative explanations for a set of findings. The second part of the course covers issues of interpretation – from detecting data patterns to inferring whether a set of findings can be generalized to other people, places, and time periods. A number of specialized topics and the ethics of psychological studies are also covered.

PSYCH
302A 1349 W2 4   Research Methods
TextbookTextbook
Jason Siegel Fri 12:20PM -
3:10PM
TBA Online class. This course surveys contemporary research methods in psychology. After a brief introduction to the philosophy of science, the major emphasis in the early portion of the course is on research conceptualization, design, and measurement, with a particular focus on the logic of minimizing the number of viable alternative explanations for a set of findings. The second part of the course covers issues of interpretation – from detecting data patterns to inferring whether a set of findings can be generalized to other people, places, and time periods. A number of specialized topics and the ethics of psychological studies are also covered.

PSYCH
302AL 1351 1 0   Research Methods Lab (MA students only)
TextbookTextbook
Jason Siegel Fri 3:40PM -
6:30PM
To Be Determined This is the research lab component of Psych 302A which has to be taken concurrently

PSYCH
302L 1350 W 0   Research Methods Lab (PhD students only)
TextbookTextbook
William Crano Mon 3:30PM -
5:20PM
No Room Needed Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. This is the research lab component of Psych 302 which has to be taken concurrently

PSYCH
306A 1443 2 2   Directed Research: Organizational, Evaluation and Positive Developmental
TextbookTextbook
Kendall Bronk Wed 10:50AM -
12:40PM
To Be Determined Additional hour of online content required each week. Class meets on 9/2, 9/16, 9/30, 10/14, 10/28, 11/11, 12/2, 12/16. All psychology students, during their first two semesters at CGU, will enroll for Directed Research (two units per semester). These units represent a ten hour per week commitment to developing and executing a research project with a faculty supervisor who is conducting an ongoing program of research. All students should enroll in one of the 306 seminars although they may arrange with the 306 instructor to work on a research project with another faculty member.

PSYCH
306B 1354 W 2   Directed Research: Social and Cognitive Research
TextbookTextbook
Michael Hogg Wed 10:50AM -
12:40PM
No Room Needed Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. All psychology students, during their first two semesters at CGU, will enroll for Directed Research (two units per semester). These units represent a ten hour per week commitment to developing and executing a research project with a faculty supervisor who is conducting an ongoing program of research. All students should enroll in one of the 306 seminars although they may arrange with the 306 instructor to work on a research project with another faculty member.

PSYCH
306F 1365 W 2   Directed Research: Organizational Behavior
TextbookTextbook
Rebecca Reichard Thu 1:10PM -
3:00PM
No Room Needed Online class. Additional online content required each week. Class meets on 9/3, 9/17, 10/1, 10/15, 10/29, 11/12, 12/3, 12/17 All psychology students, during their first two semesters at CGU, will enroll for Directed Research (two units per semester). These units represent a ten hour per week commitment to developing and executing a research project with a faculty supervisor who is conducting an ongoing program of research. All students should enroll in one of the 306 seminars although they may arrange with the 306 instructor to work on a research project with another faculty member.

PSYCH
308A 1352 W 2 M1 Intermediate Statistics
TextbookTextbook
Kathy Pezdek TueThu 8:30AM -
10:20AM
TBA Online class. Additional online content required each week. Topics include descriptive techniques, probability theory, basic statistical distributions (binomial, t, z, X2, F), measures of central tendency and variability, sampling distributions, selected nonparametric methods, and hypothesis testing.

PSYCH
308B 1353 W 2 M2 ANOVA
TextbookTextbook
Jessica Diaz TueThu 8:30AM -
10:20AM
TBA Online class. Additional online content required each week. Topics include basic analysis of variance (ANOVA) designs, nonparametric analysis, log-linear models and corresponding computer programs.

PSYCH
311B 1448 W 0 - 2   Writing Seminar
TextbookTextbook
Kathy Pezdek Tue 1:10PM -
3:00PM
TBA Online class. Class meets online on 9/8, 9/22, 10/6, 10/20, 10/27, 11/17, 12/8. Additional online content required. In this course, students will have experience presenting their research in many different formats to many different audiences. These include, a conference presentation, "elevator talk", a job talk, an executive summary, and papers of varying lengths. This course is appropriate for students at all levels in the program, as long as they have a research project well underway.

PSYCH
315EE 1381 W1 4   Evaluation Procedures
TextbookTextbook
Tiffany Berry Wed 1:10PM -
3:00PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. Evaluation practice comprises the integration of three facets: (1) program context (e.g., stakeholders, politics, maturity of the program, complexity of the program, etc.); (2) evaluators (e.g., level of expertise, theoretical perspectives, competency, etc.); and (3) evaluation methods (e.g., type of design, interviews, surveys, case studies, RCTs, etc.). These facets are interrelated and constantly evolving, yet need to be in balance for effective evaluation practice to emerge. Thus, this class is designed to cover these three facets as well as the stages of and methods for conducting program evaluations that are theoretically grounded, practical, and useful.

PSYCH
315EE 1446 W2 4   Evaluation Procedures
TextbookTextbook
Tiffany Berry Wed 10:50AM -
12:40PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. Evaluation practice comprises the integration of three facets: (1) program context (e.g., stakeholders, politics, maturity of the program, complexity of the program, etc.); (2) evaluators (e.g., level of expertise, theoretical perspectives, competency, etc.); and (3) evaluation methods (e.g., type of design, interviews, surveys, case studies, RCTs, etc.). These facets are interrelated and constantly evolving, yet need to be in balance for effective evaluation practice to emerge. Thus, this class is designed to cover these three facets as well as the stages of and methods for conducting program evaluations that are theoretically grounded, practical, and useful.

PSYCH
315Q 1444 W 4   Advanced Qualitative Research Methods
TextbookTextbook
Kendall Bronk Mon 10:50AM -
12:40PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. This course is designed to introduce you to different types of qualitative research methods, with a particular emphasis on how they can be utilized in the study of organizations. Although you will be introduced to many of the theoretical paradigms that underlie the specific methods that we will cover, the primary emphasis in the course will be on how you can utilize different methods in applied research settings. We will explore the appropriate application of various techniques and review the strengths and limitations associated with each. In addition, you will be given the opportunity to gain experience in the use of several different methods, including participant observation, interviews, focus groups, and document analysis.

PSYCH
315Q 1461 W2 4   Advanced Qualitative Research Methods
TextbookTextbook
Kendall Bronk Mon 8:30AM -
10:20AM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. This course is designed to introduce you to different types of qualitative research methods, with a particular emphasis on how they can be utilized in the study of organizations. Although you will be introduced to many of the theoretical paradigms that underlie the specific methods that we will cover, the primary emphasis in the course will be on how you can utilize different methods in applied research settings. We will explore the appropriate application of various techniques and review the strengths and limitations associated with each. In addition, you will be given the opportunity to gain experience in the use of several different methods, including participant observation, interviews, focus groups, and document analysis.

PSYCH
319 1356 W 4   Organizational Behavior
TextbookTextbook
Stephen Gilliland Tue 1:10PM -
3:00PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. This course is a detailed survey of core areas of organizational behavior. The course will cover theory, research, and selected applications on topics such as organizational structure, roles, technology, communication, effectiveness, job design and motivation, leadership, group dynamics, change and development.

PSYCH
319F 1386 W 2 M1 Organizational Justice
TextbookTextbook
Stephen Gilliland Wed 1:10PM -
3:00PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. Organizational justice is the study of perceptions of fairness in organizations. Research over the past 40 years has demonstrated that organizational justice predicts a wide variety of employee attitudes and behaviors. With a focus on advancing research and improving leader behavior, we examine theories and current directions in organizational justice around three questions: What does it mean to be fair? Why does it matter? And, why do so many leaders get it wrong?

PSYCH
320 1377 W 4   Attitudes & Social Influence
TextbookTextbook
William Crano Mon 1:10PM -
3:00PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. This course is designed to provide a broad introduction to the theories, and the experimental, correlational, and quasi-experimental research that constitutes the literature of social influence. The scientific literature of the field is extensive, so it is difficult to consider more than a small fraction of that which has been done, but we will make a valiant attempt at both broad and deep coverage. Topics will include the measurement of attitudes, attitude formation (origins of attitudes), minority influence (how minorities prevail), compliance, conformity, and obedience, principles of communication and persuasion, attitude strength and vested interest, attitude-behavior consistency, and models of attitude-behavior relations. In the final section of the course, the class will focus on applications of the research introduced of the initial sections of the course.

PSYCH
321 1363 W 4   Organizational Theory
TextbookTextbook
Maria Gloria Gonzalez Morales Wed 3:30PM -
5:20PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. Students will read and discuss weekly perspectives represented in classic works on organizations from a variety of fields. The aim is both to gain an appreciation of the eclecticism and continuing concerns in the field of organizational theory and to aid students in applying theoretical orientations to practical events. Organizations are complex phenomena that can be analyzed on the individual, group, interorganizational, and societal levels. Approaches from engineering, psychology, sociology, political science, anthropology, economics, and business administration will be included to aid our understanding of the dynamics of organizational behavior on these different levels. Topics covered in this course will include theories of organizational structure, organizations as systems and cultures, decision making, intergroup conflict and negotiation, and impacts of information technology on modern organizations.

PSYCH
322A 1391 W 4   Applying Principles of Group Influence
TextbookTextbook
Eusebio Alvaro TueThu 3:30PM -
5:20PM
TBA Online class. Class meets on specified Tues and Thurs dates: 9/1, 9/3, 9/15, 9/17, 9/29, 10/1, 10/13, 10/15, 10/27, 10/29, 11/10, 11/12, 12/1, 12/3. Additional online content required. This course will review social psychology theory and research in intra- and intergroup processes with the goal of improving health and other socially important outcomes. Students will learn how group behavior – both within and between groups – can impinge upon common outcomes and, more centrally, how such behavior may be harnessed to improve these outcomes. Moreover, students will learn how to apply this content to actual health and socially relevant contexts. Throughout the course, examples of group and interpersonal influences will be drawn from past and ongoing real-world health and social change interventions.

PSYCH
326 1452 W 2 M2 Foundations of Evaluation
TextbookTextbook
Michelle Sloper Thu 1:10PM -
3:00PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. Every time we try something new, we often ask ourselves "is it better than similar items? What makes it good? What is its value?" This process of valuing may be applied to anything from purchasing a computer, to judging the quality of a school curriculum, or an organization’s training program. The art and science of valuing is called Evaluation. All human beings evaluate, albeit informally, but the ability to evaluate systematically is important to our society and has the power to help improve individual lives and society as a whole. This course aims to introduce you to some of the prevalent ideas that underpin the evaluation field and its practice.

PSYCH
329 1360 W 4   Foundations of Positive Psychology
TextbookTextbook
Jeanne Nakamura Wed 1:10PM -
3:00PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. A general introduction to the history and intellectual sources of this new field. It will acquaint students with the main topics of research and application. These will include the phenomenology of positive experience, virtues and strengths, and institutional supports for positive development through the life course – e.g., families, schools, work environments, community involvement.

PSYCH
330A 1358 W 4   Child Development
TextbookTextbook
Saeideh Heshmati Tue 3:30PM -
5:20PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. This course surveys the theoretical and empirical literature on social and cognitive development in the first decade of life. This seminar-style course is primarily based on discussions of seminal research and theory focused on infancy through childhood. Both classic and positive developmental perspectives will be considered. Students will gain competencies in synthesizing research, critically appraising prior work, and generating new ideas for research in child development.

PSYCH
330B 1355 W 4   Advanced Topics in Organizational Psychology
TextbookTextbook
Rebecca Reichard Tue 1:10PM -
3:00PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. This required doctoral core course covers recent, advanced topics in Organizational Behavior and Positive Organizational Psychology. The course will follow a seminar-style and is discussion based, led weekly by different class member(s). Topics will be driven by class member interests, will be based on recent published reviews, and may include diversity at work, regulatory fit, implicit leadership and followership theories, mentoring, perceived org support, people and networks, Asian leadership, discrimination, teamwork and safety, job seeking, ethics, posttraumatic growth, positive emotions, teams, among others. The main class deliverable will be a polished, written review paper ready for submission to either one’s research advisor or a practitioner research institute.

PSYCH
333 1348 W 4   Theories and Concepts in Lifespan Developmental Psychology
TextbookTextbook
Jeanne Nakamura Mon 1:10PM -
3:00PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. Key objectives of this course are to understand major theories of development over the lifespan; to examine key issues in lifespan developmental psychology such as the relationship between continuity and change and to understand how these are approached by major theorists; to understand what theory is, and how it relates to research and practice; to consider psychologists’ different possible relationships to theory; and to consider how optimal development is theorized.

PSYCH
345 1426 W 4   Consulting Procedures
TextbookTextbook
Cynthia M Gilliland, Maria Gloria Gonzalez Morales Tue 3:30PM -
5:20PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. This four-unit course focuses on learning theories and developing competences for supporting processes of management consulting for organizations. Students learn best practices in scoping, developing, delivering, and evaluating successful process consulting projects. Student will work in teams to deliver a complete consulting proposal for an internal or external real-world client organization. Special focus is given to using evidence-based, client-centered, and positively-based tools and techniques to identify organizational development opportunities with high buy-in and positive impact. Success in the course will require developing the ability to understand, diagnose, and manage positive, inclusive, and fruitful team relationships.

PSYCH
350D 1364 W 4   Law & Psychology
TextbookTextbook
Kathy Pezdek, . Faculty Thu 3:30PM -
5:20PM
TBA Instructors: Kathy Pezdek, Dan Krauss, Mark Costanzo. Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. In this seminar we will explore the scientific knowledge that psychologists bring to the courtroom when they testify about topics relevant to clinical, social, cognitive and developmental psychology. The legal standards that govern the admissibility of psychology expert testimony and define the adjudication of these issues will also be critically examined. Additionally, the policy implications of modifying the governing legal standards and the scope of psychological research will be discussed. Student research projects will be a central component of the course.

PSYCH
350PW 1447 W 2 M1 Purpose at work and in Life
TextbookTextbook
Kendall Bronk Tue 10:50AM -
12:40PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. All too often, the study of positive psychology gets boiled down to the study of happiness. Well-being connotes much more than this. A growing body of research suggests that to be fully well, individuals need to have a deep sense of purpose in their lives. This class will explore (1) leading conceptions of purpose, (2) the development of purpose across the lifespan, (3) professional purposes, (4) strategies for cultivating purpose in and outside the workplace, and (5) physical and psychological health correlates of the construct, and (6) the mechanisms through which leading a life of purpose confers health benefits. In addition to exploring and discussing the latest scientific research on purpose, students will also engage in a series of empirically-supported interventions designed to help them discover what makes their own lives worth living. This 2-unit elective should appeal to a wide range of CGU students. In particular, students in Positive Developmental Psychology, Organizational Psychology, Human Resource Management, and Positive Organizational Psychology should consider this class. Students outside these areas are also welcome.

PSYCH
352T 1382 W 4   Extremism
TextbookTextbook
Michael Hogg Thu 1:10PM -
3:00PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week.

PSYCH
394 1493 1 4   Graduate Research Foundations in Psychology
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
To Be Determined Instructor: TBD. Hybrid class. Department consent required. See department for meeting details (day/time TBD). This course is designed to provide knowledge and tools to critique and evaluate theoretical, conceptual, and methodological issues in the field of Psychology. Learning outcomes include practical and applicable knowledge of what resources are available to students in the field of Psychology at Claremont Graduate University, and an introduction to current research being undertaken by CGU faculty and students in the Psychology field

PSYCH
400C 1370 1 0   Continuous Registration (Certificate Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Continuous Registration is the continuation course for a certificate level student to complete requirements for the certificate.

PSYCH
400M 1369 1 0   Continuous Registration (MA Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Continuous Registration is the continuation course for a master's level student to complete requirements for the degree.

PSYCH
422 1445 W 2   Social Identity: Theory & Application
TextbookTextbook
Michael Hogg Fri 9:00AM -
11:50AM
TBA Online class. Social identity theory has a very significant presence in social psychology, and also across the behavioral and social sciences more broadly. Because of its extension and application to explain a very wide range of phenomena, it is often considered a general perspective on human behavior. This course is an elective that is especially relevant to social psychology students but also relevant to all behavioral and organizational science students, as well as further afield to some social and political science students. The course explores basic principles of social identity theory and the social identity approach (e.g., social categorization, representation of self, social beliefs, self-enhancement, uncertainty reduction). The main focus is on how the theory has been developed and applied in different domains and to explain a wide variety of phenomena, for example: co-operation and conflict; distrust and resource exploitation (e.g., climate crisis); ethnocentrism, moral credentials and collective victimhood; “black sheep” and social exclusion; autonomy, minority influence and social change; protest movements and crowds; leadership within and between groups; organizations and the world of work; language and communication; echo chambers, social media and the internet; political polarization; health behavior. The course will be presentation and class-discussion based, and involve collaborative breakout groups tasked with designing research and/or exploring intervention and policy implications. We will also discuss limitations and explore new direction and prospects for future research.

PSYCH
499 1368 1 0   Doctoral Study (PhD Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Doctoral Study is the continuation course for a doctoral student to complete their dissertation and other requirements for the degree.

RELIGION
301 1164 W 4   Contemporary Theories and Methods in the Study of Religion
TextbookTextbook
Ruqayya Khan Thu 8:30AM -
10:20AM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. This course poses the basic questions: What is Religion? How to study Religion? It aims to introduce you to current theoretical approaches in the study of Religion/religion as represented in selected thinkers from anthropology, sociology, psychology, philosophy of religion, women's studies, lived religion and/or scriptural studies. Also, you will attain a working knowledge of some methods used in the contemporary study of religion including, for instance, the historical method, ethnography and textual hermeneutics/criticism. In addition, this seminar shall highlight contemporary theories and methods essential in and to the department’s major areas of study. Hence, this course strives to feature regular guest appearances by the Department of Religion’s faculty with corresponding assigned readings.

RELIGION
308 1169 W 4   American Catholicisms
TextbookTextbook
Daniel Ramirez Wed 3:30PM -
5:20PM
TBA Online. Additional hour of online content required each week. This course surveys the trajectory of Roman Catholicism through its arrival and dissemination in the Americas, especially in the United States, and seeks to understand current moments and future trajectories of this largest Christian tradition against the backdrop of internal and external developments such as the Catholic Reformation (Counter-Reformation), the Councils of Trent and Vaticans I and II, and Church-State relations. We will explore: 1) initial patterns of missionizing, conversion, and settlement in the Caribbean, New Spain and New France that bracketed 2) Anglo Catholic settlement, and preceded 3) later European migration (Irish, Italian, Polish, German, etc.). Viewed as perennial outsiders in the American colonies and republic, especially in light of their growth as the nation’s largest denomination, Catholics were challenged to build pathways toward the center of American culture and society. This drive toward Americanization —sometimes vigorous and sometimes ambivalent—was challenged by the need to absorb large Hispanic populations, beginning with the acquisition and conquest of Florida, Louisiana, northern Mexico, Puerto Rico, Cuba, and the Philippines. By the mid-twentieth century, American Catholics could be located at the center as part of Will Herberg’s celebrated triad: Protestant-Catholic-Jew. The intensified (and often circular) labor migration from Mexico and Central America in the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries, however, presented yet another challenge for the Church to transform into opportunity and the body politic to absorb unevenly (the “Hispanic Challenge” lamented by Samuel Huntington). Our mostly historical approach will also consider insights and perspectives from the fields of religious thought (ultramontanism, integralism, Social Doctrine, aggiornamento, liberation theology, etc.), the social sciences (e.g., surveys, “lived” and “popular” religion), creative literature (novels, plays, memoirs), and cinema, and will examine recent controversies over sexuality, gender, abuse, and authority during the papacies of John Paul II, Benedict, and Francisco. Several modules will bring the several themes and periods to bear on the study of Roman Catholicism in southern California.

RELIGION
354 1284 W 4   What Is Scripture?
TextbookTextbook
Tammi Schneider Tue 1:10PM -
3:00PM
TBA Online. Additional hour of online content required each week. This course will examine the category of "scripture." It will unpack such questions as: authority, community, role of scripture, material. There will also be an applied component as students will be responsible for choosing a "scripture" to unpack and presenting it through all the critical modes examined in the first part of the class.

RELIGION
383 1392 W 4   Pessimism and the Affirmation of Existence
TextbookTextbook
Kevin Wolfe Thu 3:30PM -
5:20PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. Charles Taylor has famously described the cultural, intellectual, and religious transformations of the modern world as having led to the malaise of modernity. Consequently, the rise and popularity of philosophical pessimism in the 19th century makes perfect sense in light of this. In fact, from the 19thcentury to the present, forms of pessimism have found various philosophical defenders. However, significant contributions to modern and contemporary philosophy and religion and critical thought have been attempts to respond affirmatively to the claims of pessimism. Beginning with, perhaps, its most articulate 19th century defender, Arthur Schopenhauer, we will focus on how various (European and American) philosophers have responded to forms of philosophical pessimism. From Friedrich Nietzsche's “affirmation of existence” to William James’s wrestling with the question, "Is Life Worth Living?" we will track the arguments, taking stock of the various claims, as we attend also to an oft-ignored set of interlocutors on these concerns, namely, the arguments of Afropessimists like Christina Sharpe and Calvin Warren.

RELIGION
400M 1160 1 0   Continuous Registration (MA Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Continuous Registration is the continuation course for a master's level student to complete requirements for the degree.

RELIGION
451 1230 W 4   Globalization, Religion, Mormonism
TextbookTextbook
Matthew B. Bowman Wed 1:10PM -
3:00PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. This class uses Mormonism as a gateway into exploring the phenomenon of globalization - by which is meant emergent connections between and movement of peoples, ideas and objects across political, linguistic, and cultural borders - as it affects religion. The religious scholar Douglas Davies has drawn a distinction between 'global' religions and 'world' religions, specifying that while a 'global' religion may be present all over the globe, a true 'world' religion has adapted to find a home among a wide variety of cultures and peoples. The course will investigate specific challenges globalization poses to different religious traditions and compare Mormonism to a number of other examples, from early modern Roman Catholicism to contemporary Islam.

RELIGION
478 1295 W 4   The Museum and the Bible
TextbookTextbook
Tammi Schneider Wed 8:30AM -
10:20AM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. This course will focus on how the Bible (in this case New and Old) has appeared in Museums. We will begin by examining the different "types" of museums that exist, what constitutes the "bible" for a museum, and different approaches that Museums have taken in "presenting" the Bible from art through Dead Sea Scrolls. Format to include mix of critical discussion, presentations and responses.

RELIGION
499 1154 1 0   Doctoral Study (PhD Students)
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty  -
No Room Needed Doctoral Study is the continuation course for a doctoral student to complete their dissertation and other requirements for the degree.

SP&E
313 1081 W 4   Microeconomics & Public Policy
TextbookTextbook
Nancy Neiman Tue 10:50AM -
12:40PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. This course is an introduction to microeconomic theory and its application to public policy analysis. You will learn basic, yet powerful analytical tools to understand and evaluate public policy problems. Topics covered include demand and supply analysis, consumer choice theory, the theory of the firm, input market analysis and the analysis of market structure.

SP&E
316 1057 W 4   Computational & Agent-Based Modeling
TextbookTextbook
Mark Abdollahian Tue 5:50PM -
7:40PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. Agent based models offer researchers a new methodological bridge across various theoretical disciplines to test recent Noble laureate Thomas Schelling’s notions of the micro motivation for macro behavior. Traditional stochastic or econometric models of political & economic phenomena are being supplanted by dynamic simulation methods drawn from multidisciplinary perspectives. For researchers and practitioners alike, no longer is it sufficient to rely on one particular methodology. Teams of social scientists are banding together to produce new computational models of phenomena where previously a single researcher could spend an entire career just to create and implement the same model. Subsequently, new skill sets are necessary not only to create models de novo, but also just to assess the utility of modeling from an informed perspective.

SP&E
317 1390 W 4   Advanced Formal Models
TextbookTextbook
Zining Yang Fri 7:00PM -
9:50PM
TBA Online class. This course is required for graduate students who want to develop modeling skills to the necessary level required for advanced research. Students will be exposed to the mechanics of a variety of formal models, including the underlying logic, implementation and application. Topics covered include game theory, spatial bargaining, social network analysis, agent-based modeling, and system dynamics, all of which are widely employed in political science and economics. The objective of the course is to prepare students for advanced courses such as SPE316, SPE438, SPE448, SPE486, ECON303, ECON316 and ECON317. There are no formal mathematical or programming prerequisites for the course.

SP&E
349F 1393 W 4   US Health Policy
TextbookTextbook
Deborah Freund Sat 9:00AM -
5:30PM
TBA Online class. Class meets 9am-5:30pm 9/12, 9/26, 10/10, 11/07, 12/05 Do you ever wonder why despite being the wealthiest country in the world, Americans are sicker and in poorer health on average than elsewhere? Or why our health care and pharmaceutical costs are higher? Or why there are disparities in health by income, race and ethnicity? Do you wonder why legislators in California and Vermont have proposed the adoption of universal insurance through a single payor system? How about what we can do to improve the situation and what the trade-offs are? Do you wonder what the future portends for students as they enter the workforce and must face their own health choices? This class will tackle these questions by studying our country’s health policy choices, those of other countries, and what we can do to improve health in communities and for individuals. And, we will stay up-to date with proposed changes in health policy in Washington. To understand health policy we will ensure an understanding of topics which underpin all of current policies including the socio economics determinants of health, the costs of care, paying for care, health disparities, how patients should be treated including collaboration and integration of care, access to care, our health workforce. The class will feature several very well-known and prominent guest speakers including physicians, hospital executives and others who will share their views of health policy issues and meet the members of class.

SP&E
350 1055 W 4   Theories and Issues in Comparative Politics
TextbookTextbook
Melissa Rogers Wed 1:10PM -
3:00PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. This course introduces major topics in comparative politics and provides basic training for comparative politics graduate students. The main purpose of this course is to introduce key questions as well as classic and modern approaches in comparative politics. The course focuses not on facts but on the task of causal (positive) explanation. It explores the major theoretical and conceptual building blocks in the sub-fields: theory, method, development, violence, culture, institutions, parties, regimes, governance, etc. Each week we discuss a subset of the pertinent scholarly literature, mainly focusing on a major theoretical controversy. We compare and contrast answers to important questions and ask what makes an explanation “good.” We discuss when a theory is most useful and if a complementary theory could be posited that would subsume previously conflicting or incompletely successful theories. Upon completion of this course, students should have an understanding of the intellectual trends in the study of comparative politics, knowledge of key concepts and spheres of debate, and an ability to articulate the strengths and weaknesses of different approaches and issues in comparative politics.

SP&E
351 1056 W 4   Comparative Political Institutions
TextbookTextbook
Melissa Rogers Wed 3:30PM -
5:20PM
TBA Online class.Additional hour of online content required each week. The study of political institutions dominates the field of comparative politics. In this course, we will examine both the validity and foundations of the study of political institutions as well as look in-depth at the institutions of modern government. This course is a core requirement for the comparative politics concentration. It provides foundational concepts and methods of analysis necessary for the regional and elective comparative politics courses. Moreover, this class is a useful elective course for concentrations in American politics and International Relations. American political institutions are used as a basis for understanding the functioning of institutions in other countries. Accordingly, students learn about American institutions and the effect of those institutions that is not visible outside of a comparative perspective. In international relations, the domestic politics of the world’s governments are crucial to understanding how they behave in the international arena. This course provides a strong foundation for analyzing the behavior and motivations of governments. Specifically, this course examines the diversity and causal effects of the institutions of democracy across the world. These include executives, legislatures, bureaucracies, courts, electoral rules, and party systems. The methods of analysis are diverse; we examine cross-national statistical research, case studies, formal models, and more. Students also learn the broad concepts of institutions and institutional analysis that can be applied across the wide variety of democracies and autocracies alike.

TNDY
304 1372 W 2 M2 Traversing the Transdisciplinary Imagination: Communication & Collaboration
TextbookTextbook
Marcus S Weakley Wed 10:50AM -
12:40PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. What does it look like to communicate and collaborate across boundaries? How does transdisciplinary research—or transdisciplinary problem-solving—differ from other forms? Why are these differences important and how can they be applied in various settings, such as academic research, business, and community programs? This class will look at these questions using the work of leading transdisciplinary scholars, amongst others. Students will develop an understanding of the range of scholarly approaches offered at CGU as well as how to collaborate across them through invited speakers from different programs, written assignments, and hands-on projects with classmates.

TNDY
305 1451 W 2 M2 Global Leadership
TextbookTextbook
. Faculty Sat 10:00AM -
12:00PM
TBA Instructor: Ryan Patel. Course meets online asynchronously every week, with two additional online synchronous meetings on Sat 11/14 & 12/12, 10:00am-12:00pm This course explores what global leadership means and how in today’s business world…. most people stick within their native environment, even though it behooves them explore outside that environment. The business world changes over time, and even more so in the past few years. These changes render business success stories fewer and farther between. Businesses struggle to adapt in their disrupted landscapes. If businesses can't stay relevant within their industries and on a global stage, imagine the difficulties each employee has to remain relevant within that business.

TNDY
336 1375 W 4   Analysis of Social Networks
TextbookTextbook
Wallace Chipidza Fri 12:20PM -
3:10PM
TBA Online class. This course explores the defining characteristics of social networks, how they form and evolve over time, and ultimately how they influence various outcomes of interest. Students utilize a variety of quantitative techniques to visualize and model the structure, formation, and evolution of social networks. Students also learn statistical and machine learning techniques to understand how individuals influence each other’s behaviors and attitudes in these networks.

TNDY
404L 1371 W 4   Judeo-Christian Thought Across the Disciplines
TextbookTextbook
Mary Poplin Sat 9:00AM -
2:50PM
TBA Online class. Class meets 9/12, 9/26, 10/10, 10/24, 11/07, 11/21, 12/05 In the last several decades, prominent intellectuals have begun to challenge the secularization of the West and the Western academy. Scholars across the disciplines (both religious and secular) suggest that there is unique knowledge inherent in the Judeo-Christian worldview that is foundational to various spheres of public and academic life and across the various academic disciplines. This Transdisciplinary seminar will examine 1) the assumptions and principles of prominent secular and religious scholars, 2) the contemporary challenges both to Judeo-Christian thought and to the dominance of secularism across the disciplines, 3) the intellectual principles of Judeo-Christian thought and their implications in the sciences, social sciences, and arts/humanities, and 4) examples from various related scholars’ work across the disciplines. Throughout the course each participant will work with a team of other classmates from diverse disciplines to address a related issue(s) of their choice and design – defining and investigating the particular topic/issue using their multiple disciplines, and ultimately developing and presenting their final project with outcomes and recommendations to the class.

TNDY
407O 1373 W 4   Corruption
TextbookTextbook
Robert Klitgaard TueThu 3:30PM -
5:20PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. Around the world, corruption is high on the list of challenges. This course examines corruption from a variety of academic perspectives, and then what might be done to reduce, though alas never eradicate, corruption. By working through case studies, we assess the uses and limitations of theory, data, and international collaboration. We study countries such as Afghanistan, Brazil, China, Colombia, Georgia, Haiti, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Mexico, the Philippines, Singapore, South Sudan, Uganda, and the United States. Although the course focuses on corruption, it engages with fundamental issues about the possibilities and limitations of theory, data, and working across cultures.

TNDY
407P 1374 W 4   Global Diplomacy: Peace, Governance & Gender
TextbookTextbook
Sallama Shaker Tue 3:30PM -
5:20PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. In a Report Published by The Institute for Economics & Peace in 2019 on UN Sustainable Development Goals #16 (Peace & Good Governance & Justice) the Report emphasizes "the importance of negotiating constructively on global and local levels to achieve 'positive peace' with a focus on conflict, justice and good governance which can be attained by building collective political will and exploring innovative ways of promoting inclusive approaches to conflict prevention and conflict resolution to pave a pathway to sustaining peace." Designed as an interactive seminar, this course will ask students to engage in an empirical analysis of 'positive peace' through collaborative group projects and case studies. We will explore the correlation between peace, development, justice, and gender equity, and how negotiations with 'velvet gloves' need to be globally oriented with respect to various cultures rather than following the traditional conservative style of diplomacy to create the pragmatic and innovative processes required to address the complex nature of failure in the current international world order.

TNDY
407Y 1376 W 4   Screening Religion: Film and Religious History
TextbookTextbook
Daniel Ramirez Mon 8:10PM -
10:00PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. The religious studies domain is a contested one in which historians strive to carve out and protect disciplinary turf, while comparing notes with (and sometimes fending off) others: sociologists, anthropologists, political scientists, theologians, etc. The guild is also perennially challenged by the alternative narratives offered by practitioners (testimonials, diaries, etc.), journalists (biographies, expose´s, hagiographies, etc.), creative writers (historical novels, plays, epics, etc.), documentarians and filmmakers. The cultural, linguistic and other turns in history have likewise opened new analytical vistas beyond the guild’s traditional approaches and methods, and have pressed historians to reflect critically on our own narrative practices. For example, do the “historical” studies based on Christopher Columbus’ diaries engage the magical narrative elements in these sources? Do novelistic treatments of these render a fuller understanding of human history and experience? One particularly promising transdisciplinary interlocutor can be found in the cinematic arts. This course will examine how notable cinematic treatments of religious events, movements, figures (both human and suprahuman) and phenomena diverge from or converge with authoritative “historical” treatments of these. Rather than scream at the screen, we will assay a transdisciplinary conversation between history and cinema, querying the shared and disparate narrative conventions and choices. Although this is not a course in Film Studies per se, we will begin with primers from that field, to see how specialists view cinema’s approach to religion and especially religious history. We will screen feature films and analyze these in light of related critical historical and primary readings, which are based, in turn, upon primary historical data. (Among the topics: Martin Luther, Henry VIII, Jesuit missions, Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz, the Scopes Trial, and the Cristero War.) The comparative study of the filmmaker and historian’s craft and method will yield a fuller appreciation of the latter guild’s creative narrative practices. A final collaborative project will apply the course findings to newly proposed community, biographical, familial or other religious histories.

TNDY
408B 1441 W 4   Law and Economics: Theory and Practice
TextbookTextbook
Gregory J. Deangelo Tue 10:50AM -
12:40PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. This course is an opportunity for students to obtain a deep understanding of the theory and empirical support in law and economics. While the course will cover many areas within law and economics, a focus will revolve around criminal justice issues. The course will be balanced out by the presence of a recently retired district attorney, who will provide practical insights into the criminal justice system. Indeed, there is often a disconnect between the way that laws and written versus the way that laws are imposed. In this course we will focus on such differences and highlight areas that are void of research, thereby promoting areas of potential dissertation research.

TNDY
408C 1440 W 4   COVID-19 and Health Systems in the USA and Around the World
TextbookTextbook
Deborah Freund Thu 5:50PM -
7:40PM
TBA Online class. Class meets Thursday evenings within the two time blocks listed (5:50-7:40 and 8:10-10:00 pm). We will do our best to accommodate student schedules for those in different time zones or who have additional needs. Please email the course instr The COVID-19 pandemic has caught all countries by surprise. In the USA and around the world, it has challenged our health systems, our insurance systems, health providers, such as hospitals and physicians, and patients themselves. And it has highlighted great disparities in care and in death rates among people by class and race. In this class we will learn about the US health system and those abroad, to understand why many countries were less prepared and some were more prepared, and what legislative, governmental, health system, insurance, pharmaceutical and provider responses have been to attempt to bring COVID-19 under control. In addition, we will understand the impact on economies around the world. We will also study the number of cases and the underlying science of COVID-19. Depending on their availability we will likely hear from highly regarded featured speakers who are working on the front lines to taking care of patients and tackling the disease and the health policy issues that impact our daily life. Class topics will be flexible in order to incorporate the most recent and pressing issues and solutions regarding COVID-19.

TNDY
430 1449 W 4   Transdisciplinary Pedagogy for Ethical Education
TextbookTextbook
Shamini Dias, Shelby Lamar Fri 9:00AM -
11:50AM
TBA Online class. This course invites you on a transformative journey to develop the mindsets to become an ethical, agile leader of learning. We present teaching as a transdisciplinary and inclusive future-focused endeavor for positive learning and development in diverse settings, within and beyond the classroom. In doing so, we engage with the question of how we can effectively and ethically respond to increasingly complex global and institutional contexts in preparing learners holistically for their futures. Working collaboratively in multidisciplinary teams, we will use systems, complexity, and design thinking frameworks to explore student identities and diversity in our classrooms, the changing global paradigms that shift our teaching missions and methods, and what learning sciences and the ethics of education tell us about engagement and motivation. We will also draw from other key frameworks such as Universal Design for Learning (UDL), Active Learning, and Good Work in this exploration. We will work reflexively by integrating a Portfolio-based approach individually and in teams to explore and document our own assumptions, values, and beliefs about education and how these transform in the light of our discoveries about ethical, agile teaching. Our goal will be to co-create pedagogical principles that transcend disciplinary teaching and learning cultures toward agile, ethical leadership of learning in our diverse educational and work contexts. To earn the College Teaching Certificate, you also must complete the PFF 531 course, Pedagogy Practicum and Portfolio.

WGS
304 1228 W 4   Feminist Research Methods and Inquiry
TextbookTextbook
Dionne Bensonsmith Wed 3:30PM -
5:20PM
TBA Online class. Additional hour of online content required each week. An examination feminist methods and theoretical approaches to research and analysis.? Participants will focus on debates within and about feminist methodology, for example, feminist theorizing of experience, feminist and women of color epistemologies, and situated knowledge.? Participants will explore theorizing across disciplines and cultural contexts, focusing on both methodology (theories of the research process) and epistemology (theories of knowledge).? We will survey a range of feminist research methods and their applications across disciplines and areas, and address contemporary methodologies employed by scholars doing research in?and?with communities of color and/or marginalized communities. Topics may include trauma-informed research methods, storywork and narrative methods, decolonial, intersectional, queer, and critical race methodologies.